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What are the Ivy Bridge and Sandy Bridge? What is the difference?

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January 2, 2012 3:50:30 PM

I wanted to buy i7-3930K, but many people told me it's better to wait for some Ivy Bridge becuase it won't support LGA 2011 socket but will support LGA 1155, and it should be faster and cheaper than 3930K. Is it 100% true?

And what is Sandy Bridge then?

Won't Intel release anything as good as Ivy Bridge for LGA 2011 socket in future?

Thank you!
a c 229 à CPUs
January 2, 2012 4:03:01 PM

Ivy Bridge will:

.... run a little cooler

.... have faster Integrated w/ faster GFX QuikSync

In other words.....stuff about 0.2% of the THG audience cares about :) 

http://www.anandtech.com/show/5276/intel-core-i7-3820-r...

Quote:
What About Ivy?

By the time the 3820 is available for purchase early next year, Ivy Bridge will be just about a quarter away. For desktop users Ivy Bridge is really only going to bring lower power consumption and a better integrated GPU. If you're seriously considering anything in the SNB-E family, the latter isn't going to matter and the former will be of arguable value.


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a c 341 à CPUs
January 2, 2012 4:09:19 PM

Sandy bridge is the current architecture for 32nm intel cpu's.

1) What will be the primary use for the cpu?

2) The i3-3930K is a fine 6 core cpu, particularly for heavy multithreaded computing. It is ok as a gaming cpu, but not very cost effective, compared to the 2500K 4 core for gaming.

3) Ivy bridge initially is a die shrink of the sandy bridge 2500K series from 32nm to 22nm. It will be perhaps 10% faster at the same price and will likely overclock a bit better.

4) No doubt, Intel will release 22nm ivy bridge for socket 2011. When and what is not now known.
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a c 83 à CPUs
January 2, 2012 4:10:38 PM

Ivy Bridge will come to socket 2011, it'll just come at a later time. Ivy Bridge is the 22nm shrink of the Sandy Bridge architecture, it'll primarily bring about cooler temps and better overclocking. A 4 core socket 1155 Ivy Bridge processor won't out perform a 6 core 2011 Sandy Bridge part in threaded applications, but it will likely overclock higher making it the better processor for most tasks due to higher clock speed.
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a c 190 à CPUs
January 2, 2012 4:20:40 PM

There are a couple of other rumors about changes to our next generation of processors like PCI-e 3.0 support. Most likely the thing that will make the biggest change is power comsumption and better IGP (Integrated Graphics on Processor) performance. Also the change from 32nm to 22nm Tri-gate is important.

Christian Wood
Intel Enthusiast Team
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January 2, 2012 4:24:58 PM

IntelEnthusiast said:
There are a couple of other rumors about changes to our next generation of processors like PCI-e 3.0 support. Most likely the thing that will make the biggest change is power comsumption and better IGP (Integrated Graphics on Processor) performance. Also the change from 32nm to 22nm Tri-gate is important.

Christian Wood
Intel Enthusiast Team

Do you know which current LGA 1155 mobos will support Ivy Bridge?
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January 2, 2012 4:30:46 PM

is it just a coincidence it has 2011 pins and was released in 2011 ?

has it even been released yet ?
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a c 341 à CPUs
January 2, 2012 4:31:54 PM

Veirtimid said:
Do you know which current LGA 1155 mobos will support Ivy Bridge?


Most P67, Z68, or H67 motherboards should support ivy bridge, possibly with a bios update. To be certain, check the specific motherboard for assurance of compatibility.
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January 2, 2012 4:33:23 PM

geofelt said:
Most P67, Z68, or H67 motherboards should support ivy bridge, possibly with a bios update. To be certain, check the specific motherboard for assurance of compatibility.

Will P8P67-M Pro support it?
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a c 341 à CPUs
January 2, 2012 4:38:12 PM

Veirtimid said:
Will P8P67-M Pro support it?


I am counting on it; that is my motherboard.
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May 22, 2012 11:37:35 PM

Best answer selected by Veirtimid.
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