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Advice on Linux Build That Will Last Me 10 Years - UPDATED!!!

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October 2, 2011 5:14:18 AM

Hello all,

First, let my spell out my goals for this build and give you an idea of what kind of user I am:

I am not a computer enthusiast. To me, a computer is a means to an end.....I do lots of research online. While I don't even know how to spell "computer gaming," I want my new machine to be capable of the odd video editing task every now and again. I haven't enjoyed the process of researching what I need to know for this build, so I'm not afraid to spend some bucks on a machine I hope will take me 10 years before I need to repeat this process.

I'm planning on my new computer being a pure Linux machine.....I'm currently planning on using Debian Squeeze (which utilizes the 2.6.32 kernel). This keeps me from purchasing bleeding edge components.....you'll see that the components I'm considering have been around a while, but are still very capable (I hope).



With all of that in mind, here we go:


Approximate Purchase Date: Some time on the first two weeks of October 2011.


Budget Range: Not a factor....as I plan to amortize the costs over a ten year period.


System Usage from Most to Least Important: Browsing (which can involve research sessions with 30 or more open tabs); standard word processing, email, and other light office-type tasks (e.g. making PowerPoint presentations); photo editing; machine must be capable of the odd video editing task, creating standard NTSC DVD-resolution movies (I guess I should plan on having HD capabilities here); no gaming; no movie watching; must be adept at viewing YouTube-type videos online


Parts Not Required: keyboard, mouse, monitor, speakers, OS (planning to use Debian Squeeze....which shows you how conservative I am!)


Preferred Website(s) for Parts: Newegg


Country of Origin: U.S.A. (Colorado)


Overclocking: Not currently, may be required in the future (remembering my 10 year timeline)


SLI or Crossfire: Not currently, may be required in the future (remembering my 10 year timeline)


Monitor Resolution: Currently 1600x900...which is very much suitable for my purposes....I can't imagine ever going to a multi-screen setup.


Additional Comments: In the interest of longevity, low temperatures are important to me, preferable attained with simple air cooling and robust component thermal margins. Quiet is nice, but my ears are shot, so I can live with some noise.


----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


My proposed build so far:


OS: Debian Squeeze

CPU: Intel Core i7-980 Gulftown

Motherboard: Asus P6X58D-E, but I'm leaning strongly toward the ASUS P6X58D Premium LGA 1366 Intel X58 SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard, since it has true SSD Express Gate (something I think I would get a lot of use out of) and more robust cooling.

Graphics Card: EVGA 01G-P3-1371-AR GeForce GTX 460 (Fermi) FPB EE 1GB 256-bit GDDR5 PCI Express 2.0 x16 HDCP Ready SLI Support

Memory: Two kits of Kingston 12GB (3 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1066 (PC3 8500) Desktop Memory Model KVR1066D3N7K3/12G for a grand total of 24GB.

Storage: Crucial RealSSD C300 CTFDDAC128MAG-1G1 2.5" 128GB SATA III MLC Internal Solid State Drive (SSD)

Optical drive: ASUS 24X DVD Burner - Bulk 24X DVD+R 8X DVD+RW 12X DVD+R DL 24X DVD-R 6X DVD-RW 16X DVD-ROM 48X CD-R 32X CD-RW 48X CD-ROM Black SATA Model DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS - OEM

Card Reader: AFT XM-35U BLACK USB 2.0 Kiosk Card Reader (3.5")

Case: LIAN LI PC-9F Black Aluminum ATX Mid Tower Computer Case

Printer (already purchased): HP Photosmart Premium Fax e-All-in-One Printer - C410a

I will report here when I decide on a PSU.


------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


A few questions:

1. How am I doing on my component choices?

2. Re compatibility: If Debian Squeeze does not provide support for SATA III (which the above SSD is capable of), I'll just run it at SATA II until Wheezy goes stable. Comments?

3. I probably caused a few eyebrows to rise with my choice of 1066 RAM. I think this is the fastest you can go when using 24GB for the Gulftown processor (see above). Can anyone verify this?

4. Of the two mobo's I listed, which would be better for me?


Thank you all, in advance. I've posted my proposed build on my Debian forum and have gotten lots of help, but I think there is a higher general level of hardware expertise over here at Tom's!
October 2, 2011 5:21:54 AM

I think more eyebrows will raise regarding your choice of gulftown instead of sandy bridge.
October 2, 2011 6:44:28 AM

I'd say you were killing a mouse with an atomic bomb . Even thinking of adding a gaming graphics card is diametrically opposite to your design rational

An entry level sandy bridge quad core
z68 motherboard
2 x4 gig of 1333 MHz RAM at 1.5 volt or lower
400 - 500 watt psu
use the cpu's onboard video
Related resources
October 3, 2011 2:39:19 AM

Sky03 said:
I think more eyebrows will raise regarding your choice of gulftown instead of sandy bridge.



Sky,

Thanks for your input......

I've heard that Linux users have been having their share of problems w/ Sandy Bridge. I've also heard that Sandy Bridge quad-cores run hot (whereas Gulftowns reportedly run quite cool - and that is very attractive to me). Also, I'm not certain that the Linux driver set is mature with regards to the 1155 mobo's.

For those reasons, I was sort of scared off of the Sandy Bridge bandwagon.

I think the Linux user faces many more challenges than do Windows users when it comes to building high-end systems.
October 3, 2011 2:45:05 AM

And it will play games.

Buying something massively overpowered for what you want now should guarantee you ten years of browsing. Maybe a year or two of gaming while you're at it.
October 3, 2011 2:55:24 AM

Outlander_04 said:
I'd say you were killing a mouse with an atomic bomb . Even thinking of adding a gaming graphics card is diametrically opposite to your design rational

An entry level sandy bridge quad core
z68 motherboard
2 x4 gig of 1333 MHz RAM at 1.5 volt or lower
400 - 500 watt psu
use the cpu's onboard video



Out,

I appreciate your input.

"Killing a mouse with an atomic bomb," indeed! Yes, my proposed build WOULD be drastic overkill for a non-demanding user like myself.....for this year.

Next year, the mouse has grown into a rat. A few years later, he has become an elephant. Nine years from now (remember, I am shooting for 10 years of usability out of this machine), the harmless little mouse has morphed into a mountain-sized asteroid, hurtling malevolently towards the Earth.......for that, we really could USE a nuke!

What I'm getting at here is that we all know that the computing environment gets tougher year by year. If I want my machine to be usable in 2021, I need to overbuild in 2011.....big time!

Your build idea sounds nice....for a Windows guy. Linux users have been having their share of problems with Sandy Bridge, which is why I crossed it off of my short list of CPUs.

With regards to your observation about my build including a gaming graphics card.....I presume you were talking about my aversion to heat in the system. Well, my choice of case (the Lian Li PC-9F) is a positive pressure design, which should work well with the external exhaust cooling architecture of the GTX 460 graphics card I've chosen. In addition, since my storage will be limited to a single 2.5" SSD, I'll be able to remove the HDD rack in the case, improving the airflow in the case even more.

Or, perhaps you were inferring that I'd be better off with a workstation graphics card. If so, please elaborate....I'm all ears!

Thanks!

Anyone else? I need ideas!
October 3, 2011 3:24:51 AM

I do see your point about the pc aging , and agree with your RAT next year analogy

but I doubt this is the best way to handle this situation .
You can build a computer for less than half as much that will work fine for many years , and do everything you want .

I doubt anyone except very high end graphics pro's using 64 programs will ever need that amount of RAM

and the gaming graphics card is for gaming . A GTS 220 is a more appropriate gfx card ...and always will be
October 3, 2011 5:23:08 AM

Outlander_04 said:
I do see your point about the pc aging , and agree with your RAT next year analogy

but I doubt this is the best way to handle this situation .
You can build a computer for less than half as much that will work fine for many years , and do everything you want .

I doubt anyone except very high end graphics pro's using 64 programs will ever need that amount of RAM

and the gaming graphics card is for gaming . A GTS 220 is a more appropriate gfx card ...and always will be



Out,

Yep, I've been looking for a way to get away from the Gulftown CPU (lots of $$$). My problem is that, for me, the Gulftowns are the only i7's that run cool enough to make me happy. And, please remember, I want to keep the door open to having a robust video editing capability (where more cores = gooder, I think).

For me, the Intel Core 2 Quad Q9650 Yorkfield 3.0GHz 12MB L2 Cache LGA 775 95W Quad-Core was running second in the CPU sweepstakes. It's got a good track record and reportedly runs cool. Do you think this CPU can gracefully make it all the way to 2021? If so, what is the, high quality, reliable, cool-running 755 mobo I should be considering?

I could not find a "GTS 220", but I DID find this: GIGABYTE GV-N220OC-1GI GeForce GT 220 1GB 128-bit DDR3 PCI Express 2.0 x16 HDCP Ready Video Card. Is this what you're referring to? I like the fact that the card runs cool. I don't need a gaming card.....I just need something that is up to the task of video editing.

I've taken some flak over wanting 24GB of RAM, and not just here. All I can say is, the difference between 12GB and 24GB of RAM is $75.00. That tells me that there is no reason NOT to go all out (to 24GB)!

One more question: I hear lots of folks complaining about Realtek LAN controllers. Would it be worth my while to consider popping in a $40.00 Intel NIC if the mobo I buy "features" Realtek LAN?

I appreciate everyone's time and expertise. My specialties lie elsewhere and it's easy to get overwhelmed with this computer stuff if you haven't kept up with it over the years!
October 4, 2011 3:24:18 AM

I've picked a PSU:

COOLER MASTER Silent Pro Gold Series RSA00-80GAD3-US 1000W ATX 12V v2.3 / EPS 12V v2.92 SLI Ready CrossFire Ready 80 PLUS GOLD Certified Modular Active PFC Power Supply

Also, a mobo I was looking at has come back into stock @ Newegg, so I'm ditching the Asus P6X58D-E for the ASUS P6X58D Premium LGA 1366 Intel X58 SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard. The Premium is $90.00 more than the "-E" and is a bit slower, but it features more robust cooling and true SSD internal Express Gate (both of which are attractive to me - the "-E" has Express Gate (HD based), but you need to install it under Windows (a show-stopper for me)). It also can't support RAID on the SATA 3 outputs, but I can't imagine that that will ever be important to me.




The build so far:

OS: Debian Squeeze

CPU: Intel Core i7-980 Gulftown

Motherboard: ASUS P6X58D Premium LGA 1366 Intel X58 SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard

Graphics Card: EVGA 01G-P3-1371-AR GeForce GTX 460 (Fermi) FPB EE 1GB 256-bit GDDR5 PCI Express 2.0 x16 HDCP Ready SLI Support

Memory: Two kits of Kingston 12GB (3 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1066 (PC3 8500) Desktop Memory Model KVR1066D3N7K3/12G for a grand total of 24GB.

Storage: Crucial RealSSD C300 CTFDDAC128MAG-1G1 2.5" 128GB SATA III MLC Internal Solid State Drive (SSD)

Optical drive: ASUS 24X DVD Burner - Bulk 24X DVD+R 8X DVD+RW 12X DVD+R DL 24X DVD-R 6X DVD-RW 16X DVD-ROM 48X CD-R 32X CD-RW 48X CD-ROM Black SATA Model DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS - OEM

Card Reader: AFT XM-35U BLACK USB 2.0 Kiosk Card Reader (3.5")

PSU: COOLER MASTER Silent Pro Gold Series RSA00-80GAD3-US 1000W ATX 12V v2.3 / EPS 12V v2.92 SLI Ready CrossFire Ready 80 PLUS GOLD Certified Modular Active PFC Power Supply

Case: LIAN LI PC-9F Black Aluminum ATX Mid Tower Computer Case

Printer (already purchased): HP Photosmart Premium Fax e-All-in-One Printer - C410a


Thoughts, anyone, on the mobo switch and my choice of PSU?


Next up: A mouse (my old one seems to be dying).
October 5, 2011 4:07:30 AM

I've gotten some suggestions that, since I'm not a gamer, but would like to be able to do some video editing every now and again, perhaps I ought not be thinking only of gaming graphics cards.

What you y'all think of these two cards?:

PNY VCQ600-PB Quadro 600 1GB 128-bit DDR3 PCI Express 2.0 x16 Low Profile Workstation Video Card

PNY VCQ2000D-PB Quadro 2000D 1GB 128-bit GDDR5 PCI Express 2.0 x16 Workstation Video Card

The 2000D, in particular, might just be able to give 10 years of viable service, since it shares basically the same hardware with the very capable GTS 450.

Gawd, it's spendy though! Even with the lower operating costs compared to the GTX 460 I was considering, it's still a hard shot to the wallet!
October 8, 2011 3:19:11 AM

Update.

Gettin' ready to pull the trigger. The only thing stopping me is verification of RAM stability. Apparently, the X58's can be very finicky!

Has anyone here ever successfully, for a year or longer, been able to pull off 24GB of RAM on a P6X58D Premium mobo without overclocking? If so, how did you do it?

TIA!
October 8, 2011 3:29:13 AM

I just saw this right now but you do know that you'd be getting most out of your money if you spend on a $500 build right now, then replacing it when it breaks down which can last up to more than 5 years if you are careful.

It's more unrealistic to think that a build will last about 10years.

What you also need can be supplied easily with low tech AMD or Intel CPU. I can run 30 tabs of Chrome on my wolfdale 2.93ghz dual core with 2gb of ram.

It's not a very good idea. I can easily make you a build that would cost about $400 dollars that would run what you want to run. $500 with a windows OS . Well, the best would be at the $600 mark. You'd get a better case with coolers so it can run really cool.
October 8, 2011 3:31:21 AM

Digger1 said:
I've picked a PSU:

COOLER MASTER Silent Pro Gold Series RSA00-80GAD3-US 1000W ATX 12V v2.3 / EPS 12V v2.92 SLI Ready CrossFire Ready 80 PLUS GOLD Certified Modular Active PFC Power Supply

Also, a mobo I was looking at has come back into stock @ Newegg, so I'm ditching the Asus P6X58D-E for the ASUS P6X58D Premium LGA 1366 Intel X58 SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard. The Premium is $90.00 more than the "-E" and is a bit slower, but it features more robust cooling and true SSD internal Express Gate (both of which are attractive to me - the "-E" has Express Gate (HD based), but you need to install it under Windows (a show-stopper for me)). It also can't support RAID on the SATA 3 outputs, but I can't imagine that that will ever be important to me.




The build so far:

OS: Debian Squeeze

CPU: Intel Core i7-980 Gulftown

Motherboard: ASUS P6X58D Premium LGA 1366 Intel X58 SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard

Graphics Card: EVGA 01G-P3-1371-AR GeForce GTX 460 (Fermi) FPB EE 1GB 256-bit GDDR5 PCI Express 2.0 x16 HDCP Ready SLI Support

Memory: Two kits of Kingston 12GB (3 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1066 (PC3 8500) Desktop Memory Model KVR1066D3N7K3/12G for a grand total of 24GB.

Storage: Crucial RealSSD C300 CTFDDAC128MAG-1G1 2.5" 128GB SATA III MLC Internal Solid State Drive (SSD)

Optical drive: ASUS 24X DVD Burner - Bulk 24X DVD+R 8X DVD+RW 12X DVD+R DL 24X DVD-R 6X DVD-RW 16X DVD-ROM 48X CD-R 32X CD-RW 48X CD-ROM Black SATA Model DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS - OEM

Card Reader: AFT XM-35U BLACK USB 2.0 Kiosk Card Reader (3.5")

PSU: COOLER MASTER Silent Pro Gold Series RSA00-80GAD3-US 1000W ATX 12V v2.3 / EPS 12V v2.92 SLI Ready CrossFire Ready 80 PLUS GOLD Certified Modular Active PFC Power Supply

Case: LIAN LI PC-9F Black Aluminum ATX Mid Tower Computer Case

Printer (already purchased): HP Photosmart Premium Fax e-All-in-One Printer - C410a


Thoughts, anyone, on the mobo switch and my choice of PSU?


Next up: A mouse (my old one seems to be dying).


honestly, there isn't much I recommend to you, since I know very little about linux systems.
However, 1000w is complete overkill for that system. Even 750w would be more than enough. Also, don't get a cooler master psu. They tend to have a lot more issues compared to antec, xfx, seasonic, and pc power and cooling.

having a low quality psu will kill your entire machine fairly quickly, making 10 years of use fairly challenging
October 8, 2011 3:36:48 AM

Anyway, just post this on new build forums and ask how much money you'd need to sink in just to get it. I assure you it would be about $400-$600.

System Usage from Most to Least Important: Browsing (which can involve research sessions with 30 or more open tabs); standard word processing, email, and other light office-type tasks (e.g. making PowerPoint presentations); photo editing; machine must be capable of the odd video editing task, creating standard NTSC DVD-resolution movies (I guess I should plan on having HD capabilities here); no gaming; no movie watching; must be adept at viewing YouTube-type videos online.

oh yeah, you won't need 24gb of ram lol. 4gb would be enough for what you do. I hope you consider your build. It's really a waste of money.
October 8, 2011 3:58:22 AM

youu will not really get 10 years of use out of that computer.

I'd be like trying to manage today on a 600 MHz Pentium III with 256 megs of Ram and a 1 GB Hard drive on a NVidia TNT2 16 MB video card, running windows 98.

It would have trouble just loading this web page.

10 years in computers is like a century in almost any other technology. Its POINTLESS to even try. computers in 10 years increase in capability over 100 fold.

your needs match that of a $350 Llano PC. Which will work for you for about 3 years. Then you build another $350 PC and use it for 3 years, then you build another $350 PC and use it for 3 years. you've just hit 2020, and you've spent over that time you've spent $1050, a quarter of what you were sinking into the gulftown, and the $350 PC you would be about to built will have 60-80 timres the horsepower of that $4000 monster you were looking at.

October 8, 2011 4:03:36 AM

ScrewySqrl said:
youu will not really get 10 years of use out of that computer.

I'd be like trying to manage today on a 600 MHz Pentium III with 256 megs of Ram and a 1 GB Hard drive on a NVidia TNT2 16 MB video card, running windows 98.

It would have trouble just loading this web page.

10 years in computers is like a century in almost any other technology. Its POINTLESS to even try. computers in 10 years increase in capability over 100 fold.

your needs match that of a $350 Llano PC. Which will work for you for about 3 years. Then you build another $350 PC and use it for 3 years, then you build another $350 PC and use it for 3 years. you've just hit 2020, and you've spent over that time you've spent $1050, a quarter of what you were sinking into the gulftown, and the $350 PC you would be about to built will have 60-80 timres the horsepower of that $4000 monster you were looking at.


+10 years lol. I think he can makes those $350 PCs last about 5 years though especially if he doesn't plan to do game or any heavy applications. In the long run, the max you would be spending is $1000 over the span of 10years.
October 9, 2011 2:30:45 AM

cutebeans said:
I just saw this right now but you do know that you'd be getting most out of your money if you spend on a $500 build right now, then replacing it when it breaks down which can last up to more than 5 years if you are careful.

It's more unrealistic to think that a build will last about 10years.

What you also need can be supplied easily with low tech AMD or Intel CPU. I can run 30 tabs of Chrome on my wolfdale 2.93ghz dual core with 2gb of ram.

It's not a very good idea. I can easily make you a build that would cost about $400 dollars that would run what you want to run. $500 with a windows OS . Well, the best would be at the $600 mark. You'd get a better case with coolers so it can run really cool.


Cute,

Thanks for your input.

What you are discounting in your very valid 5-year plan is my hatred for the research I am having to do right now. If I can make this machine last 10 years and have it still meet my modest (save video editing) needs before having to go through this sucky process again, I'll be one happy hombre.....I'm willing to spend some bux and take some chances in order for that to happen!

I do, however, plan on backing down to 12GB of RAM (from my initially proposed 24GB), as I'm just not seeing lots of evidence out there that folks are pulling off 24GB on the P6X58D Premium mobo with decent, long-term stability.
October 9, 2011 2:38:55 AM

morgoth780 said:
honestly, there isn't much I recommend to you, since I know very little about linux systems.
However, 1000w is complete overkill for that system. Even 750w would be more than enough. Also, don't get a cooler master psu. They tend to have a lot more issues compared to antec, xfx, seasonic, and pc power and cooling.

having a low quality psu will kill your entire machine fairly quickly, making 10 years of use fairly challenging



Morg,

Thanks for your post.

Yep, I'm aware of the overkill issue. However, I used a few online PSU calculators and they all came up with about 950-1000w (I input SLI, a few extra cards, and advanced capacitor aging, since I want to keep those upgrade options open and want the machine to last 10 years).

Oh, BTW, my latest build proposal (seen here) utilizes the Antec HCP-1200 since I could not find any 1000-1199w PSU's that had both 5-egg reviews (on Newegg) AND several good technical reviews. The Antec has both. I appreciate your input on the Cooler Master, however.
October 9, 2011 2:46:45 AM

Hi cute....my comment in bolt italics.

cutebeans said:
Anyway, just post this on new build forums and ask how much money you'd need to sink in just to get it. I assure you it would be about $400-$600.

I wonder how much it would be if I said that I wanted said machine to be usable for me for the next 10 years?

System Usage from Most to Least Important: Browsing (which can involve research sessions with 30 or more open tabs); standard word processing, email, and other light office-type tasks (e.g. making PowerPoint presentations); photo editing; machine must be capable of the odd video editing task, creating standard NTSC DVD-resolution movies (I guess I should plan on having HD capabilities here); no gaming; no movie watching; must be adept at viewing YouTube-type videos online.

oh yeah, you won't need 24gb of ram lol. 4gb would be enough for what you do. I hope you consider your build. It's really a waste of money.

Re the money comment....that's not your call, as I see it. The way I see it is that I'm spending extra $$$ now so that I can prolong the period of time before I need to go through this (for me) painful research thrash again.....that would be worth some serious coin to me. I am strongly considering, however, backing off from 24GB of RAM to 12GB, for practical, conservative reasons.




Thanks for your input, AND your genuine concern for my financial situation!
October 9, 2011 2:59:03 AM

Screw,

Thanks for the input and your insight. My comments in bold italics.


ScrewySqrl said:
youu will not really get 10 years of use out of that computer.

I'd be like trying to manage today on a 600 MHz Pentium III with 256 megs of Ram and a 1 GB Hard drive on a NVidia TNT2 16 MB video card, running windows 98.

It would have trouble just loading this web page.

10 years in computers is like a century in almost any other technology. Its POINTLESS to even try. computers in 10 years increase in capability over 100 fold.

I agree that 10 years is a LOT to be expecting, but I can try! It's funny, some folks are telling me that my machine is overkill and some say that it is not ENOUGH overkill to go the distance. As is usually the case, the correct answer will probably end up lying somewhere in between those two extreme views.

your needs match that of a $350 Llano PC. Which will work for you for about 3 years. Then you build another $350 PC and use it for 3 years, then you build another $350 PC and use it for 3 years. you've just hit 2020, and you've spent over that time you've spent $1050, a quarter of what you were sinking into the gulftown, and the $350 PC you would be about to built will have 60-80 timres the horsepower of that $4000 monster you were looking at.

I really can't argue with your figures there, except for a few points.....one factual, one intangible. Fact: My build will most likely come in somewhere under the $1900 mark (I'm probably gonna go with 12GB, vice 24GB of RAM). Intangible: Your economic analysis leaves out one overriding factor.....my hatred for the amount of time I've had to devote to the research needed to put this build together. The longer I can delay going through that process again, the happier I'll be.....and that, my friend, is worth a fair amount of scratch to me.


Thanks for posting!
October 9, 2011 4:39:31 AM

Well, I guess there's no other input we can give you since you sound pretty set on never doing this again for 10 years. My parting advice would be to go with PC Power and Cooling brand for the PSU since it's backed by a 7-year warranty. No other PSU in the business has this.
October 9, 2011 4:42:12 AM

I guess money is no factor for you and by all means go with it. Good luck.
October 9, 2011 10:41:11 AM

OK, you want an unlocked six core CPU. Here's my suggestion

AMD Phenom II X6 1090T Black Edition http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

GA-880GMA http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

G.SKILL Ripjaws Series 16GB http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Total less than $350. It has integrated graphics which should be enough for what you're doing. If not, add a 220/240 like someone suggested. You're unlikely to even use this CPU 100% so that's at least less money wasted. You're gonna be fine with a 400W PSU. Add case, HDD, SSD and other accessories from your original build.
October 10, 2011 5:43:03 AM

Hi steel,

My comments in bold.

steelbeast said:
Well, I guess there's no other input we can give you since you sound pretty set on never doing this again for 10 years.

That I am, my friend.....this research has put a deep dent into my motorcycle-riding time! Ten years would be too soon to repeat it!

My parting advice would be to go with PC Power and Cooling brand for the PSU since it's backed by a 7-year warranty. No other PSU in the business has this.

Y'all have beaten me down concerning PSU choice....I think I'll ditch the Antec HCP-1200 for the Corsair HX850. 350 watts less....AND a 7 year warranty! Thanks for making me rethink this one, everyone!

October 10, 2011 5:49:51 AM

cutebeans said:
I guess money is no factor for you and by all means go with it. Good luck.



Hi cute,

Well, as I see it, one of the reasons God invented money in the first place was so that we could sometimes use it to avoid the things we don't like to do. I, for one, (and, I'll bet I'm the only swingin' dick here @ Tom's that can honestly say this), am hating this research process and wish to delay the next round for as long as I can. It's really cutting into my motorcycle-riding time!

But, you have all been a great help to this stubborn old fighter pilot....thanks for your patience! Please keep the constructive comments coming! I really do appreciate and consider each and every one!
October 10, 2011 6:00:06 AM

FinneousPJ said:
OK, you want an unlocked six core CPU. Here's my suggestion

AMD Phenom II X6 1090T Black Edition http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

GA-880GMA http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

G.SKILL Ripjaws Series 16GB http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Total less than $350. It has integrated graphics which should be enough for what you're doing. If not, add a 220/240 like someone suggested. You're unlikely to even use this CPU 100% so that's at least less money wasted. You're gonna be fine with a 400W PSU. Add case, HDD, SSD and other accessories from your original build.



Finn,

Thanks for that suggestion (and, it's a GOOD one, too). Sadly, you are a bit late.....I pulled the trigger on the mobo (an X58) yesterday, as it went out of stock @ Newegg and I feared I was encountering the end of its availability.

So, all future discussion of this build has to assume an X58 mobo!

I did, however, back off on the PSU, see above. I'm gonna stick with the GTS 450, though, since it's only $120.00 and I can preserve the SLI option. And, since I'm shooting for a 10 year period of usable life from my build, it's all about preserving options!

Thank you!
October 10, 2011 6:14:53 AM
October 10, 2011 9:41:45 AM

Your build is pretty good already. It can do anything you want to do ^_^.
October 11, 2011 2:23:44 AM

I've got only one more little issue to settle before doing my part to stimulate the economy:

I'm tryin' to choose among the following three (and only the following three) RAM buys (and, unless convinced otherwise, am going to go with "just" 12GB):

3x4GB sticks (12GB total) of Kingston ValueRAM @ 1066

3x4GB sticks (12GB total) of Kingston HyperX RAM @ 1600

6x4GB sticks (24GB total) of Kingston HyperX RAM @ 1600

I do not wish to overclock anything in the machine (gasp!)! I do not wish to drive the RAM using anything more than 1.5v (gasp!)! I do not wish run the RAM at anything faster than 1066 (gasp!)!


QUESTIONS:

1. Will the HyperX RAM run cooler, everything else being equal, than the ValueRAM under the operating constraints I listed above (1066/1.5v.)? FYI, system will be air cooled in a three-fan Lian Li PC-9F case, utilizing nothing but stock component coolers.

2. Has anyone here been able to pull off 24GB of Kingston HyperX 1600 running at 1066 @ 1.5v, on a P6X58D Premium mobo and still be able to boast of supreme, long-term stability?

3. If I buy one of the HyperX kits and pop the DIMMs into my new mobo's memory slots, what will the system default to on initial boot?

....3a. Will it be 1066/1.5v?

....3b. What will the timings default to?

........3b(i). If said timings default to something different than 7-7-7-20, should I then change them to 7-7-7-20?

....3c. Should I expect the BIOS to see all 12GB (or 24GB) right off the bat?


Seriously, thanks, y'all, for helping me out!!!!!
October 13, 2011 4:57:13 AM

My build has gone final:

Here

Perhaps the strangest build ever seen here @ Tom's.......

I appreciate all of the help.....I learned a lot here!

And, if I live that long, I plan on necro-posting to this thread annually for the next 10 years, or until either I or the computer dies, to let y'all know how my "10 year plan" is going! (I'll bet most of you can hardly wait......vbg).
October 13, 2011 1:29:57 PM

good luck!
October 14, 2011 10:19:31 PM

Digger1 said:
Update.

Gettin' ready to pull the trigger. The only thing stopping me is verification of RAM stability. Apparently, the X58's can be very finicky!

Has anyone here ever successfully, for a year or longer, been able to pull off 24GB of RAM on a P6X58D Premium mobo without overclocking? If so, how did you do it?

TIA!

well in the computer world every month is a diffrence i my self would wait tell it breaks 4 ghz then ram will be ddr 4 and next year all the 3 will be half price but lets all think when will the soft ware catch up does it look for 2 and 3 of a 4 core intel chip or amd does it use duo channell ram or is it still thinkinking singly remember the best today might look good but dont it hurt when the price dropes or goes south i used to build a computer every week and i learned i was wasting my money now i run a q6600 and is still kicking ass i do have a quad core 3.0 amd unit built it still sitting looking pretty and lost its value remember toys only good for a month or 2 and another thought intell just got off the i3 chip and its junk but after 3 years or so they finally sold out or gave up
madd computer geek
October 18, 2011 2:40:51 AM

madd computer geek said:
well in the computer world every month is a diffrence i my self would wait tell it breaks 4 ghz then ram will be ddr 4 and next year all the 3 will be half price but lets all think when will the soft ware catch up does it look for 2 and 3 of a 4 core intel chip or amd does it use duo channell ram or is it still thinkinking singly remember the best today might look good but dont it hurt when the price dropes or goes south i used to build a computer every week and i learned i was wasting my money now i run a q6600 and is still kicking ass i do have a quad core 3.0 amd unit built it still sitting looking pretty and lost its value remember toys only good for a month or 2 and another thought intell just got off the i3 chip and its junk but after 3 years or so they finally sold out or gave up
madd computer geek



madd,

I'd love to go bleeding edge, but I'm a Squeeze guy....nocandoo!

Thanks for your input!
October 28, 2011 2:06:45 PM

I wanted to throw in there that YOU don't have to do this research.

This website posts a completely built PC in a certain $ range every single month that is agreed upon by experts.

They can offload a lot of that work for you.

- Edit - In case it isn't clear, I mean you can offload later research efforts on this website if you go for a good enough now and another good enough 5 years from now approach.

Also, I wanted to say that I almost guarantee you that no computer you can make will last 10 years without any problems.

PSUs tend to have max 5 year warranties because the makers don't think they will make it much longer than that. Even if everything else makes it 10 years, which is entirely possible, you are quite likely to have to get a new PSU between 5 and 10 at some point.

That isn't too bad, mind you, but you probably won't be able to just buy exactly the same thing again and you will have to do some research in the future unless you buy two of the exact same thing now and just keep one shelved as a spare that long. This isn't guaranteed to work because mechanical things tend to atrophy unused, but it could. If cost is no object it couldn't hurt.

Other than that, plan to have to research a PSU again even if you are getting the ultra-awesome one you are getting now.
November 2, 2011 1:51:30 AM

Raiddinn said:
I wanted to throw in there that YOU don't have to do this research.

This website posts a completely built PC in a certain $ range every single month that is agreed upon by experts.

They can offload a lot of that work for you.

- Edit - In case it isn't clear, I mean you can offload later research efforts on this website if you go for a good enough now and another good enough 5 years from now approach.

Also, I wanted to say that I almost guarantee you that no computer you can make will last 10 years without any problems.

PSUs tend to have max 5 year warranties because the makers don't think they will make it much longer than that. Even if everything else makes it 10 years, which is entirely possible, you are quite likely to have to get a new PSU between 5 and 10 at some point.

That isn't too bad, mind you, but you probably won't be able to just buy exactly the same thing again and you will have to do some research in the future unless you buy two of the exact same thing now and just keep one shelved as a spare that long. This isn't guaranteed to work because mechanical things tend to atrophy unused, but it could. If cost is no object it couldn't hurt.

Other than that, plan to have to research a PSU again even if you are getting the ultra-awesome one you are getting now.



Hi Raid,

Thanks for your inputs!

I actually looked into the recommended builds, but was thwarted because I could find none that were verified compatible with Linux. One pays a price when one has the moxie to turn one's back on Bill and his minions!
November 12, 2011 10:27:15 PM

It is a bit late for me to respond again, but this thread fell through the cracks on my end.

I just wanted to say that Linux is generally pretty generic in terms of what it will work on.

I have a computer that dual boots Ubuntu Linux and Windows XP. Ubuntu just works without any configuration mostly, XP requires driver updates and stuff much more often.

99% likely all those builds in the thread I showed you would work with Ubuntu or any other linux NP.
November 17, 2011 10:23:18 PM

Digger1 said:
Hello all,

First, let my spell out my goals for this build and give you an idea of what kind of user I am:

I am not a computer enthusiast. To me, a computer is a means to an end.....I do lots of research online. While I don't even know how to spell "computer gaming," I want my new machine ...


This is a great example of Just Because you Can do Something, Doesn't Necessarily Mean You Should.

Fact of the matter is that you are ignoring Moore's "Law"

It's not possible to build a system that won't be outmoded long before you hit the 10 year mark.

I'd follow your thread from year to year, but there isn't any real point.

I already know that I'm right, you're wrong, and that you lack the education to realize this.

I suspect that the reason this hasn't been thoroughly explained to you here is that your whole "I don't know Art, but I know what I like" attitude is mildly offensive at best.

How would you feel if I told you that while I have no research training (not entirely true) I want you to assist me in developing a research strategy that you can see at a glance is unsound?




November 18, 2011 1:44:35 AM

Well, I don't really go around being offensive because I don't really think this place would benefit from an adversarial tone, ymmv.

I look at it like we are all on the same team and my goal is just to try to compromise with people.

If I can tell one helpful thing to each person even if I can't get their buy in on 100% of what I say they are still better off than without.

The optimal case would probably be for him to do the additional research every so often, but he is willing to accept the drawback from not acting optimally, so the best thing to do is to help him the way he wants to be helped, which I tried to do.

Even if you are right and the person who started this whole discussion is wrong, I highly doubt you are going to get through to him by being angry and offensive.

I can't really condone fighting with the people posting questions in this manner regardless of who is right and who is wrong.
November 18, 2011 5:24:02 PM

Raiddinn said:
I highly doubt you are going to get through to him by being angry and offensive.

I can't really condone fighting with the people posting questions in this manner regardless of who is right and who is wrong.


I don't disagree with you.

It's not the first time I've seen this approach.

My goal was really just to add a note for posterity that might dissuade someone else from following in his footsteps.

It's that future neophyte system builder I'm trying to warn - the OP is already committed, and I probably should be.
January 14, 2012 12:43:46 AM

Last update for this cycle:

The machine is built. I've got Debian Squeeze running with Xfce4 as my desktop. My browser is Iceweasel.

What can I say? At this point, this machine is ridiculous overkill. It is blazingly fast for my needs.....the browser operates faster than I can process info. No waiting.

I've not seen RAM usage get over 800M, and I've got 24 GB to work with. I've never seen the aggregate CPU usage get over 5% (12 threads are available). I've never seen the CPU temps get higher than 40C.

As a previous poster said, I'm killin' a mouse with an atomic bomb!

Will check back a year or so from now with an update!

Thanks again for all of y'all's help. Right now, I'm a happy pappy!
May 17, 2012 9:58:36 AM

Digger1 said:
Last update for this cycle:

The machine is built. I've got Debian Squeeze running with Xfce4 as my desktop. My browser is Iceweasel.

What can I say? At this point, this machine is ridiculous overkill. It is blazingly fast for my needs.....the browser operates faster than I can process info. No waiting.

I've not seen RAM usage get over 800M, and I've got 24 GB to work with. I've never seen the aggregate CPU usage get over 5% (12 threads are available). I've never seen the CPU temps get higher than 40C.

As a previous poster said, I'm killin' a mouse with an atomic bomb!

Will check back a year or so from now with an update!

Thanks again for all of y'all's help. Right now, I'm a happy pappy!

You really messed up, man. Really shoulda listened to them, cause they're right, lol.
May 30, 2012 5:10:35 PM

Hi ALL, I could only read about HALF of these replies but my humble noobie input would be to go Highest RAM you can get with High end graphic process, widest buss, memory and power supply. Linux system building is a venture that is more like putting a puzzle together but anything is better than windows at this point.

A lot of replies cried Over-Kill but from what I have seen the trend is for more graphic intense streaming video content on the internet in multi layers, so you'd be lucky to get 10 years out of any system. The technology wants to favor the more resently built systems to promote ans support its own fiscal condition. That said, Good Luck and thanks for the Posts ALL.
May 30, 2012 7:13:59 PM

Something about this thread just screams "Troll!". The idea of building a rig that most of us could only dream of having, just so that you can browse the web seems a bit odd.

Why would you want to have the option of using SLI if you don't ever plan on gaming?
January 13, 2013 11:45:17 PM

UPDATE:

Here is my rig:

  1. Squeeze 6.0.6; 2.6.32 kernel; amd64
  2.  
  3. Intel i7-980 Gulftown CPU
  4. Asus P6X58D Premium Motherboard
  5. EVGA GeForce GTS-450 Graphics Card
  6. G.SKILL Ripjaw DDR3-1600, PC3-12800, 1.5v RAM (6x4GB sticks, 24GB total)
  7. Crucial RealSSD C300 128GB SSD
  8. Western Digital Caviar Black 1TB HDD
  9. Corsair HX850 PSU
  10. MSI TV@nywhere Plus Analog Video Capture Card
  11. Asus DRW-24B1ST Black STAT 24X DVD/CD Player/Burner, OEM
  12. AFT XM-35U Black Kiosk Card Reader (3.5")
  13. Lian Li PC-9F Case
  14. 2006-Vintage HP Internet Keyboard (PS/2)
  15. Acer H203H LCD Wide-Screen monitor
  16. Logitech QuickCam Pro 9000
  17. Logitech M-SBF96 PS/2 Mouse
  18. HP Photosmart Premium Fax e-All-In-One C410 Printer
  19. Actiontec Q1000 Modem/Router
  20. 1998-Vintage Altec Lansing Speakers





Well, I've been using this machine for about a year and I can only say that I should have gone Linux several years ago......I could have saved so much time by not fiddling with Windows buffoonery all of that time....

The machine is still awesome. Very quick, very overpowered, and runs very cool. I couldn't be more pleased at this point.

FYI, I've been able to verify that all of the hardware works with my OS. Although I've converted a few dozen VHS tapes to MPEG2 files, I've not yet done any non-linear editing with this machine. I DID, however, recently convert (using the imagemagick "convert" command) 340 pdf files (averaging 250 kB each) to jpg format (using a density factor of 150 and a sharpening factor of 0x3). She was chugging along at about 95% load, but the CPU never got any warmer than 52 deg C.

One year down.....nine to go! ;) 
January 16, 2014 12:58:24 PM

Update:

The build specs remain as listed in my post above from last year.

The machine continues to provide satisfying performance. No complaints, really.

The only problem I've noted is that, every four months or so, the computer will gag on a web page. Perhaps my video card is showing it's age....dunno.

Two years in, eight to go.....still runnin' strong!
!