Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Shutter Speed Lag an issue?

Last response: in Digital Camera
Share
Anonymous
April 8, 2005 9:21:33 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Have heard it was an issue for digital cameras, and it certainly is for the
chealie unit built into my palm Pilot. How big an issue is it with a decent
quality point & shoot digital camera? Any models/techniques/capabilities
that stand out in conquering the issue?

TIA - R.
Anonymous
April 8, 2005 9:21:34 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

R. wrote:
> Have heard it was an issue for digital cameras, and it certainly is for the
> chealie unit built into my palm Pilot. How big an issue is it with a decent
> quality point & shoot digital camera? Any models/techniques/capabilities
> that stand out in conquering the issue?
>
> TIA - R.
>
>
It certainly was an issue with my older digital camera, but it is not
with the current one. However, I am not terribly happy with the method
for eliminating it. On my current camera, when you press the shutter
half-way down, the camera focuses (takes a second), and reads the light,
etc, then you press the button all the way down to take the picture.
There is no perceptible lag (I am sure there is SOME lag, but I don't
notice) between the complete press and the taking of the picture, BUT,
if you forget to allow the camera to focus, you may get a blurred
picture. This change in 55 years of operating method causes me some
trouble now and then, but it does solve the problem of 'shutter lag'.
And camera that uses autofocus must be given time to focus, which also
applies to film cameras. Beyond that, the problem seems to be corrected
in the newer P&S cameras.


--
Ron Hunter rphunter@charter.net
April 8, 2005 1:28:25 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Rob it's a massive issue on some of the point & shoots. My wife has a small
Casio & having tried to use it myself you may as well confine yourself to
landscapes & portraiture as anything moving is sheer guesswork (you need to
anticipate where they'll have moved to about a sec after you actually press
the button & hope they are in shot when the camera finally decides to
register it!).

However, I also have both a 10D and now a 20D and these are a massive
improvement. The 'lag' on the 10D is 90ms whilst on the 20D 65ms. In real
use with the I found on laterally moving subjects whilst I never completely
missed a shot due to the lag the composition was lost as the subject had
moved across the image (enough to be annoying).

The 20D seems a big improvement though it still doesn't feel as quick as my
old EOS 1's. However, the massive price hike to get a Canon EOS-1D Mark II
(with it's mere 20ms lag) is hard to swallow as a non-pro shooter (never
mind justify to the wife!!)

Regards

DM

"R." <rob.fisher@ourden.ca> wrote in message
news:xxo5e.924265$8l.334326@pd7tw1no...
> Have heard it was an issue for digital cameras, and it certainly is for
> the chealie unit built into my palm Pilot. How big an issue is it with a
> decent quality point & shoot digital camera? Any
> models/techniques/capabilities that stand out in conquering the issue?
>
> TIA - R.
>
Related resources
Anonymous
April 8, 2005 2:59:32 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

R. wrote:

> Have heard it was an issue for digital cameras, and it certainly is for
> the chealie unit built into my palm Pilot. How big an issue is it with a
> decent quality point & shoot digital camera? Any
> models/techniques/capabilities that stand out in conquering the issue?

Varies enormously from camera to camera. My Nikon CoolPix 5000 has slight
shutter lag, but not too bad. The most annoying thing is the time it takes
to get ready after switching on. My D-70 switches on instantly and has no
shutter lag - just like using a film SLR.

--
@+
Anonymous
April 8, 2005 3:44:09 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

R. wrote:
> Have heard it was an issue for digital cameras, and it certainly is
> for the chealie unit built into my palm Pilot. How big an issue is it
> with a decent quality point & shoot digital camera? Any
> models/techniques/capabilities that stand out in conquering the issue?
>
> TIA - R.

It has been a big problem with all digital cameras.

It has been well addressed on the last crop of dSLR's and some of the
most recent point and shoot models are much better.

My suggestion is be sure to pick up any camera you are considering
buying and actually go through all the steps of taking a photo with it.
Find out how comfortable you are with working all the controls and observe
that delay as well.

--
Joseph Meehan

Dia's Muire duit
Anonymous
April 8, 2005 9:01:03 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Joseph Meehan wrote:
> R. wrote:
>
>>Have heard it was an issue for digital cameras, and it certainly is
>>for the chealie unit built into my palm Pilot. How big an issue is it
>>with a decent quality point & shoot digital camera? Any
>>models/techniques/capabilities that stand out in conquering the issue?
>>
>>TIA - R.
>
>
> It has been a big problem with all digital cameras.
>
> It has been well addressed on the last crop of dSLR's and some of the
> most recent point and shoot models are much better.
>
> My suggestion is be sure to pick up any camera you are considering
> buying and actually go through all the steps of taking a photo with it.
> Find out how comfortable you are with working all the controls and observe
> that delay as well.
>
And remember the delay will probably be greater in low light situations
where some cameras have a harder time with autofocus. One can also
avoid some delay by using a mode that disables (or presets) the focus.
Most newer cameras have MUCH shorter delays after focusing issues are
resolved.


--
Ron Hunter rphunter@charter.net
!