Macro lens for Nikon D70

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

I'd like to choose a quality macro lens for the D70.
B&H offers two that interest me. There's a 55 mm manual
focus USA Nikkor - and there's a 60 mm Nikkor autofocus
lens with 1:1 magnification. Interestingly the manual
focus (1:2) lens costs more. I wonder why. Which
lens is preferable if *sharpness* (not price) is the
first consideration

Judging by the pricing, there must be a parameter
I'm missing

Thanks.
Luk


http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/controller/home?ci=1&sb=ps&pn=1&sq=desc&InitialSearch=yes&O=SearchBar&A=search&Q=*&shs=Nikkor+macro+lenses&image.x=7&image.y=8
14 answers Last reply
More about macro lens nikon
  1. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    luk <luknofurther@comcast.net> writes:
    > I'd like to choose a quality macro lens for the D70. B&H offers two
    > that interest me. There's a 55 mm manual focus USA Nikkor - and
    > there's a 60 mm Nikkor autofocus lens with 1:1 magnification.
    > Interestingly the manual focus (1:2) lens costs more. I wonder why.
    > Which lens is preferable if *sharpness* (not price) is the first
    > consideration

    For the D70 I'd definitely get the 60mm. MF lenses are a pain to use
    on the D70. For macro work on a copy stand, it might not be so bad.

    The 60mm is an excellent lens and is at least as sharp as the 55mm,
    which is excellent in its own right. It's quite a different design than
    the 55mm and I seem to remember something about its focal length changing
    more as you focus close, which makes computing manual flash exposure a
    little more complicated. These days, everyone uses dedicated flash
    with automatic TTL metering, and manual calculation is almost
    irrelevant except for advanced studio work where they would probably
    use a D2X rather than a D70.

    AF lenses in general have been less expensive than their MF counterparts,
    with (in general) no loss in sharpness.
  2. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    luk <luknofurther@comcast.net> wrote:

    >I'd like to choose a quality macro lens for the D70.
    >B&H offers two that interest me. There's a 55 mm manual
    >focus USA Nikkor - and there's a 60 mm Nikkor autofocus
    >lens with 1:1 magnification. Interestingly the manual
    >focus (1:2) lens costs more. I wonder why. Which
    >lens is preferable if *sharpness* (not price) is the
    >first consideration

    Have you tried shooting MF on the D70 yet? I wouldn't recommend it,
    since the focussing screen is not all that great.

    You could consider the 105mm/f2.8 too, though that's considerably
    more expensive. Judging by objective measurements, the 60mm is
    an extremely sharp lens. I wouldn't necessarily assume price is
    directly equated to quality/performance; it could be that the more
    expensive one is just harder to acquire. I'm considering the
    60mm myself.


    --
    Ken Tough
  3. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    "luk" <luknofurther@comcast.net> wrote in message
    news:86SdnTuaTsxdKcvfRVn-iQ@comcast.com...
    > I'd like to choose a quality macro lens for the D70.
    > B&H offers two that interest me. There's a 55 mm manual
    > focus USA Nikkor - and there's a 60 mm Nikkor autofocus
    > lens with 1:1 magnification. Interestingly the manual
    > focus (1:2) lens costs more. I wonder why. Which
    > lens is preferable if *sharpness* (not price) is the
    > first consideration
    >
    > Judging by the pricing, there must be a parameter
    > I'm missing
    >
    > Thanks.
    > Luk

    I have both the 60 and the 105 and they are both outstanding. It all comes
    down to working distance.

    Tom
  4. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    "Tom Scales" <tomtoo@softhome.net> writes:
    > I have both the 60 and the 105 and they are both outstanding. It all comes
    > down to working distance.

    The 105 is outstanding in sharpness but it has some field curvature.
    That makes the 60 better if you're photographing flat objects like postage
    stamps from close up.
  5. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    In article <EXFCJaA+UtVCFwLd@objectech.co.uk>, ken@objectech.co.uk says...
    >
    >luk <luknofurther@comcast.net> wrote:
    >
    >>I'd like to choose a quality macro lens for the D70.
    >>B&H offers two that interest me. There's a 55 mm manual
    >>focus USA Nikkor - and there's a 60 mm Nikkor autofocus
    >>lens with 1:1 magnification. Interestingly the manual
    >>focus (1:2) lens costs more. I wonder why. Which
    >>lens is preferable if *sharpness* (not price) is the
    >>first consideration
    >
    >Have you tried shooting MF on the D70 yet? I wouldn't recommend it,
    >since the focussing screen is not all that great.
    >
    >You could consider the 105mm/f2.8 too, though that's considerably
    >more expensive. Judging by objective measurements, the 60mm is
    >an extremely sharp lens. I wouldn't necessarily assume price is
    >directly equated to quality/performance; it could be that the more
    >expensive one is just harder to acquire. I'm considering the
    >60mm myself.
    >
    >
    >--
    >Ken Tough

    Love the 105mm! Have not tried the 60, but have used (actually used UP) 2 55
    's, which were good lenses. Those guys got stuck on about every tube known to
    mankind, plus bellows, reversed, whatever. I just liked the working distance
    of the 105 and do not mind it nowadays with D70. However, with the mag ratio
    of dSLRs the 60 will give you about what I got from the 105 on 35mm. I have
    not tried the 55 with, or without tubes, on the D70, but think that they would
    definitely be tough considering the afore mentioned focusing screen.

    Hunt
  6. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    noone@hunt.com (Hunt) writes:
    > Love the 105mm! Have not tried the 60, but have used (actually used
    > UP) 2 55 's, which were good lenses. Those guys got stuck on about
    > every tube known to mankind, plus bellows, reversed, whatever.

    Another point, the 55 uses 52mm filters while the 60 uses 62mm.
    Result: different reversing rings, bellows adapters, etc.
  7. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    On 2005/4/8 8:05 PM, "Paul Rubin" <http://phr.cx@NOSPAM.invalid> wrote:
    >
    > For the D70 I'd definitely get the 60mm. MF lenses are a pain to use
    > on the D70. For macro work on a copy stand, it might not be so bad.

    Please elaborate. I have been considering this lens. What are the pain
    points? Is this a result of the dSLR format or specific to the D70?
  8. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    On Sat, 09 Apr 2005 09:38:45 -0400, in rec.photo.digital Bob Haar
    <bobhaar@comcast.net> wrote:

    >On 2005/4/8 8:05 PM, "Paul Rubin" <http://phr.cx@NOSPAM.invalid> wrote:
    >>
    >> For the D70 I'd definitely get the 60mm. MF lenses are a pain to use
    >> on the D70. For macro work on a copy stand, it might not be so bad.
    >
    >Please elaborate. I have been considering this lens. What are the pain
    >points? Is this a result of the dSLR format or specific to the D70?

    The focusing screen on the D70 isn't great for manual focusing.
    ----------
    Ed Ruf Lifetime AMA# 344007 (Usenet@EdwardG.Ruf.com)
    See images taken with my CP-990/5700 & D70 at
    http://edwardgruf.com/Digital_Photography/General/index.html
  9. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    On 2005/4/9 9:44 AM, "Ed Ruf" <egruf_usenet@cox.net> wrote:

    > On Sat, 09 Apr 2005 09:38:45 -0400, in rec.photo.digital Bob Haar
    > <bobhaar@comcast.net> wrote:
    >
    >> On 2005/4/8 8:05 PM, "Paul Rubin" <http://phr.cx@NOSPAM.invalid> wrote:
    >>>
    >>> For the D70 I'd definitely get the 60mm. MF lenses are a pain to use
    >>> on the D70. For macro work on a copy stand, it might not be so bad.
    >>
    >> Please elaborate. I have been considering this lens. What are the pain
    >> points? Is this a result of the dSLR format or specific to the D70?
    >
    > The focusing screen on the D70 isn't great for manual focusing.

    \OK. I can understand that. I would expect to bracket a number of shots
    anyway, so I might have to take some extra ones to act as a "preview".
  10. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    Ken Tough wrote:
    > luk <luknofurther@comcast.net> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>I'd like to choose a quality macro lens for the D70.
    >>B&H offers two that interest me. There's a 55 mm manual
    >>focus USA Nikkor - and there's a 60 mm Nikkor autofocus
    >>lens with 1:1 magnification. Interestingly the manual
    >>focus (1:2) lens costs more. I wonder why. Which
    >>lens is preferable if *sharpness* (not price) is the
    >>first consideration
    >
    >
    > Have you tried shooting MF on the D70 yet? I wouldn't recommend it,
    > since the focussing screen is not all that great.
    >
    > You could consider the 105mm/f2.8 too, though that's considerably
    > more expensive. Judging by objective measurements, the 60mm is
    > an extremely sharp lens. I wouldn't necessarily assume price is
    > directly equated to quality/performance; it could be that the more
    > expensive one is just harder to acquire. I'm considering the
    > 60mm myself.
    >
    >
    You can pick up good 55mm 2.8 and 3.5 AI micro-nikkors cheap second hand
    (I just sold a nice one for US$ 50). But not only will you not get
    autofocus, but you also won't get metering on a D70. Also, if you do
    stuff closer than 1:2, having to muck around with an extension tube is a
    pain in the neck - and a good method to help get dust on your sensor -
    which you will see very clearly on macro shots taken at very small
    apertures. Try 105mm as well as 60mm. If you like 105mm, then look at
    Sigma 105mm EX. IMO the Nikkor advantage is mechanical quality. The
    Sigma 2 stage focus option improves (but doesn't completely solve) one
    difficulty that these lenses present - it takes an eon for the lenses to
    focus from 1:1 to infinity and back - and sods law ensures that the lens
    will do that at the most critical moment. Most of your sharpness issues
    with any of these lenses on a D70 are going to relate to focussing (the
    screen isn't brilliant for MF, and as mentioned above, you will find AF
    extremely annoying at times), and controlling mirror induced camera shake.
    The 105mm is also a useful and quite fast f2.8 medium telephoto, and the
    60mm a good portrait lens.
    Incidentally, I have had reasonable (much better than I expected)
    results with a 13mm tube on the kit 18-70 zoom, at 50mm and above.
  11. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    Bob Haar <bobhaar@comcast.net> wrote:

    >On 2005/4/9 9:44 AM, "Ed Ruf" <egruf_usenet@cox.net> wrote:
    >> The focusing screen on the D70 isn't great for manual focusing.
    >
    >\OK. I can understand that. I would expect to bracket a number of shots
    >anyway, so I might have to take some extra ones to act as a "preview".

    You can't really tell about precise focus from the LCD review on
    the back of the camera either, so you might need to download to
    computer to check you've got it right. Though if you use the
    "super zoom in" trick [Magnify, then ISO + command wheel during
    image review], you can tell a bit better about the focus.


    --
    Ken Tough
  12. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    Ken Tough wrote:

    > Bob Haar <bobhaar@comcast.net> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>On 2005/4/9 9:44 AM, "Ed Ruf" <egruf_usenet@cox.net> wrote:
    >>
    >>>The focusing screen on the D70 isn't great for manual focusing.
    >>
    >>\OK. I can understand that. I would expect to bracket a number of shots
    >>anyway, so I might have to take some extra ones to act as a "preview".
    >
    >
    > You can't really tell about precise focus from the LCD review on
    > the back of the camera either, so you might need to download to
    > computer to check you've got it right. Though if you use the
    > "super zoom in" trick [Magnify, then ISO + command wheel during
    > image review], you can tell a bit better about the focus.


    For hand held shots chasing a bug around the yard AF is too slow for
    extreme macros. I just set the focus manually & move the camera in & out
    till it looks good. You can't judge perfect focus on the tiny viewfinder
    but moving it back & forth you can see where the limits are on either
    end and chose the middle pretty easily.
  13. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    I'm grateful for the excellent responses to my
    original post. You have me leaning toward the
    autofocus lens.

    I have another question about the D70's
    compatibility with a 14 year old lens, but
    will start a different thread for that.

    Luk
  14. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    Consider the Sigma 150mm f/2.8 AF. I recently got one & was shocked at the
    quality. I was previously a died-in-the-wool Nikkor lens fanatic, but no
    more.
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