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Sceptre x22wg Monitor - Possibly Dying?

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a b C Monitor
August 6, 2011 5:18:55 AM

I have a 22 inch Sceptre x22wg (1680x1050) monitor. Originally connected by a DVI to HDMI cable, and now connected by a DVI to DVI cable. Hooked up to an Nvidia 275 gtx. I have owned the monitor for about 4 to 5 years.

Current Problem:

Description of problem is while the computer is powered on.

When I turn on the monitor the blue power LED blinks slowly. About a 3 second pause in between blinks. While the power LED blinks there is nothing being displayed on the screen. No computer output, no black background with text stating "no signal" or anything. During the blinking of the LED I can hear something inside the monitor. The only way I can describe it is a clicking sound. It's audible to the point that I can hear it from my chair about two feet away. I let the monitor do this for a few minutes and then the display itself will start. A black background with text displaying "no signal". I then wait another few minutes and finally the video output from the computer will show up on the screen.

Any ideas what could have caused this, and if this is a sign that the monitor is about to fail?

Earlier Symptoms:

A couple of days ago the monitor would not display any computer output but the "no signal" text was displayed. I fixed this by rebooting the computer a couple of times.

It happened again but a reboot didn't solve the issue so I swapped cables from a DVI to HDMI to a DVI to DVI. Same thing happened a day later but I was able to resolve the situation but unplugging the DVI port on the monitor and plugging it back in while the computer was on.

This morning I turned the monitor on and not only was there no video being displayed but the power LED did not come on. It seemed as if the monitor was receiving no power at all. I listened closely (ear right over the grill on top of the monitor) to the inside of the monitor and could hear a faint clicking. I'd say the click had about a 2 to 3 second pause to it. I unplugged the power cord to the monitor and plugged it back in. Nothing.

I decided to power cycle the device a few times waiting roughly 10 to 20 minutes between unplugging and plugging back in. Eventually I got the power LED to come on again. At this point I just let the monitor sit there and after waiting it started acting like I described under "Current Problem"

.....

Thanks for any help or comparable past experience you can share.
August 7, 2011 11:52:44 AM

I don't have any previous experience but I would agree with your assessment that something's about to go wrong. That clicking could be anything but could possibly mean that the power supply or the backlight is malfunctioning.
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a b C Monitor
August 7, 2011 4:53:49 PM

Yeah the clicking sound goes away as soon as the display actually outputs something. It's at least consistent now.

I turn on the monitor and wait about 10-15 minutes and it will eventually turn on the display itself. If I turn off and on the monitor after the "warm up" described it will turn on with out another "warm up" needed.

Still not sure what caused this...hmm. Or if there is a way to fix it.
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August 7, 2011 5:11:11 PM

If you feel like it you could open up the monitor and pinpoint where the sound is coming from. However since the monitor shouldn't have any moving parts the clicking sound could only come from a component inside. Have you tried using teh VGA port?
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a b C Monitor
August 7, 2011 6:11:37 PM

I have not tried using the VGA port yet. Only because the monitor doesn't try to pull any source material until after about 10-15 minutes. After the display turns on it pulls the material from the dvi just fine.

I think when I have some time and possibly a backup monitor I will crack it open. Thanks for the suggestion. Maybe a capacitor issue?
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August 7, 2011 6:46:14 PM

There would be a popping sound, but that only means the liquids inside are boiling from heat and since you just started it it shouldn't be the problem. If you hear a loud pop though that means capacitors have blown off the board and if you turn the monitor from side to side you should hear the little guy rolling around inside.
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Best solution

August 7, 2011 8:56:55 PM

Yes, you need to replace the feeble stock capacitors that came on your monitor's internal board. It's easy. If you are good with a soldering iron, there is a company out there which sells kits for this process.

Go to Corporate Computer.com, I believe it's actually ccl-la.com . (or look it up on google or whatever) They provide a list of monitor makes and models, and will send you a capacitor replacement kit for yours. I paid like 12 bucks for the 2 kits.

I did this on my twin Optiquest monitors 2 months ago and they're just fine, like new.
They even provided me with an online tutorial w/ pics! It really was easy, and you'll be proud of yourself when that puppy fires up again! (use your normal original cabling)

Good luck, and smooth computing!

:sol: 
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a b C Monitor
August 10, 2011 6:12:31 AM

mister g said:
There would be a popping sound, but that only means the liquids inside are boiling from heat and since you just started it it shouldn't be the problem. If you hear a loud pop though that means capacitors have blown off the board and if you turn the monitor from side to side you should hear the little guy rolling around inside.


Yeah the sound I hear when its "warming up" is more of a buzzing/popping. Not super loud popping but audible. I didn't know that would be an indication of the liquids boiling, thanks for the tip. I will hopefully soon find out soon enough when I have time to open the the monitor up.

RANJMAAN said:
Yes, you need to replace the feeble stock capacitors that came on your monitor's internal board. It's easy. If you are good with a soldering iron, there is a company out there which sells kits for this process.

Go to Corporate Computer.com, I believe it's actually ccl-la.com . (or look it up on google or whatever) They provide a list of monitor makes and models, and will send you a capacitor replacement kit for yours. I paid like 12 bucks for the 2 kits.

I did this on my twin Optiquest monitors 2 months ago and they're just fine, like new.
They even provided me with an online tutorial w/ pics! It really was easy, and you'll be proud of yourself when that puppy fires up again! (use your normal original cabling)

Good luck, and smooth computing!

:sol: 


Thanks for the tips on where and how to get the components. I will hopefully be able to open the monitor up soon. I recently started having issues with my modem too and needed to focus on that for the time being. Anyways...

I appreciate all the tips you two gave me. I will most definitely report back as soon as I find out whats going on inside the monitor. I just need to set aside some time to open it up and investigate.

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a b C Monitor
August 10, 2011 6:05:44 PM

Using my old LG 17 inch flatron monitor. Man this is painful. :heink: 

So I was able to crack open the Sceptre monitor today. I pulled out the circuit board used for power management(not sure on the technical term of this board). I noticed some capacitors right off the bat that looked blown. What I'm a little confused about is all the white goop I saw.

Is the white liquid a sign of a failed component? I took pictures and it seems that most of the components on this board have white liquid around them.

Pictures below....

Entire board...


Bottom right where I noticed popped (open top) capacitors...


White goop...


More white liquid...


Even more white liquid...



- I took a picture of any component I saw that had any white liquid on it. So are these white liquid tainted components broken as well? The rest of the pictures can be seen here ---> http://s792.photobucket.com/albums/yy203/shinyfield/sce...
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August 10, 2011 11:41:44 PM

I have no idea what the white stuff is. Capacitor liquid is brown and corrosive, the white stuff looks like leftover...something. Since the monitor is already partly screwed I would go with what the other guy said and buy some new ones and then try and find a safe way to remove the white stuff. It doesn't seem to belong.
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August 11, 2011 9:45:31 AM

That white stuff is just a binding compound, much like silicone, which is used to hold the components on the board during production.
While the leads are being soldered. When you remove the capacitors, try to remove this as well. It could hinder your new solder connection.
Don't worry, it's harmless. It just melted off a little from the heat.

Hope you find the time. Nice pics, BTW.

Good luck, and smooth computing!

RanJ
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a b C Monitor
August 12, 2011 5:41:06 AM

I decided to replace all four of the Capxon 470µF 25v (C644 KF 105°C) caps on the bottom right. I'm checking out items and prices on digikey.

Here's the Caps I'm thinking of getting. http://search.digikey.com/scripts/DkSearch/dksus.dll?De...

Is the ripple rate of 995mA okay for a monitor? And is a lifetime of 3000 Hrs @ 105°C okay as well for a monitor?

Thanks for the help!
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August 12, 2011 5:27:06 PM

Not a bad choice on the caps. Generally 105 c would be wicked hot on a board. That is over the boiling point.
So elevate the life of 3000 hrs for a lower heat rate. Which I'm sure yours is around 70-80c
You may still want to go to that CA place for the exact quality match on your caps.
Like I said before, it's cheap. I got the exact replacement for mine twice for under 12 bucks!

You are looking at pennies on the dollar right now, but need to make sure you get the proper caps.
Your decision skaz.

Once again, good luck!
and smoooth computing!

RanJ
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a b C Monitor
August 17, 2011 4:26:49 PM

Capacitors are on their way...

I had a little delay between my modem cutting off my internet connection and the removal of the old capacitors.

I think I figured out my modem issue. Seems my upstream power level is to high. Its fluctuating between 52 dBmV (working) and 55 dBmV (not working).

As for the old capacitors and removal. I wanted to measure height and diameter. It was my first time soldering so I bought a cheap soldering iron and screwed the tip up. After I realized that I should have tinned the tip properly it was too late. Old solder connecting old capacitors wouldn't melt. Fixed that by purchasing a new iron and tinning correctly =). Although I noticed the new TIP of the TIP has already blackened and isn't tinning.

On a side note I successfully soldered a new TRS plug to my Sennheiser headphones. No longer do I have a 10 foot cable wrapped up in my pocket while listening to music =).

I'll update this thread as soon as I receive, solder, and power on the new capacitors.
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August 18, 2011 11:24:19 PM

I am curious as to how you will get new Caps in there with a cheap soldering iron that was not tinned properly.
You need a quality instrument here.

Good luck, man.
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a b C Monitor
August 19, 2011 12:40:43 AM

I bought a new iron and tinned it correctly. Its just literally the tip of the tip is blackended. The rest of the tip is fine.
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a b C Monitor
August 24, 2011 10:07:01 PM

Alright...I'm typing this from my 22 inch Monitor =)

Capacitors arrived today. USPS is so slow. =/

Replaced and soldered all 4 of the 470uf caps (ended up purchasing Samxon's from badcaps.net). Screwed, plugged, and popped everything back where it should be and powered her on. :D 

Thanks guys for your time, help and recommendations. I'm extremely happy I was able to resurrect my monitor. :hello: 

Pics below of my new caps and my soldering job.



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a b C Monitor
August 24, 2011 10:08:24 PM

Best answer selected by skaz.
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August 25, 2011 12:17:26 AM

No need, I was reading the entire post and trying to learn a thing or two. Never really got to learn how to solder, might as well learn.
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August 25, 2011 2:43:10 AM

Way to go, Skaz. Fine looking job- and it works, too! You must feel pretty cool about that. Now go ahead and fix everyone else's monitors. Make a few bucks. They all have the same problem. BAD CAPS!
You go guy...

RanJ
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August 25, 2011 2:55:53 AM

BTW- it says I'm a youngster. I joined computing.net back in 04. It is now Tom's Hardware as of last year I think. Anyway- I'm glad I could help, and thanks for best answer!
Good Luck and Smoooth Computing!

RanJ
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