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$1600 Budget Gaming PC

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October 8, 2011 5:33:39 AM

Approximate Purchase Date: Mid-November, 2011-December, 2011

Budget: $1600 (Willing to spend a bit more if necessary)

System Usage from Most to Least Important: Gaming, Video Editing/Production, Heavy Multi-tasking, Music, Watch Movies, Browsing)

Parts Not Required: Mouse, Monitor, OS

Preferred Website for Parts: www.newegg.com

Country of Origin: USA

Parts Preferences: Nvidia for graphics, Intel for Processor

Overclocking: In the future

SLI or Crossfire: Maybe in the future

Monitor Resolution: 1920x1080

Additional Comments: This will be my first build and I appreciate the time any takes to give me a recommendation or suggestion. I am open to everyone's opinion or suggestion. I have been doing my research for parts for about two weeks now I have pretty much everything decided but if anyone thinks I should swap something for another item, I'd be glad to hear it.

Parts:

Computer Case: Corsair Special Edition White Graphite Series 600T Will probably purchase from www.compusa.com its about 10 bucks cheaper there.



Motherboard: ASUS P6X58-E PRO LGA 1366 Intel X58

ASUS P8Z68-V PRO LGA 1155 Intel Z68

REASON OF CHANGE: Discovered that previous choice was a socket 1366. My processor of choice is a 1155.

ASRock Z68 EXTREME4 GEN3

REASON OF CHANGE: This ASRock is pretty much the same price but gives me PCI-E 3.0 support.

MSI Z68A-GD80 (G3)

REASON OF CHANGE: MSI board includes a 5 year warranty and has Hi-C capacitors.


Processor: Intel Core i7-2600K Sandy Bridge



CPU Heatsink & Fan: Noctua NH-D14

NOTE: I am still thinking about what to go with for Heatsink & Fan. The choice above is not exactly my choice currently more like the highest possibility.


Power Supply: CORSAIR Professional Series HX750 (CMPSU-750HX) 750W

CORSAIR Professional Series HX850

REASON OF CHANGE: Wanted to go with something higher just to make the power supply future-proof.



Graphics Card/Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 570



RAM: CORSAIR Vengeance 12GB (3 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600

G.SKILL Ripjaws Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800)

REASON OF CHANGE: 12 GB of RAM was overkill. Also, the Corsair RAM card's heatsinks would probably block the cpu's heatsink except for the included ones.

G.SKILL Sniper Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1866

REASON OF CHANGE: Faster.



SSD (For OS+Games): Corsair Force CSSD-F115GB2-BRKT-A 2.5" 115GB

Corsair Force Series GT CSSD-F120GBGT-BK

REASON OF CHANGE: The GT has practically twice the speed for both reading and writing.



HDD (For Data): Western Digital Caviar Black WD1002FAEX 1TB 7200 RPM



Optical Drive: SAMSUNG Black 12X BD-ROM 16X DVD-/+R 48X CD-ROM



Keyboard: Microsoft SIDEWINDER X4

NOTE: I plan to mainly use an Xbox 360 Controller to game for all games that support it. Thus, I am not looking for the best keyboard for gaming.


I'd appreciate any ones opinion or suggestions on the parts that I have chosen for my build. Once again, this is my first time building a computer so any suggestions from those who have experience not just on choosing parts but on building as well, is highly appreciated.

More about : 1600 budget gaming

October 8, 2011 5:37:31 AM

Samsung Spinpoint.

Your motherboard choice is wrong. It should be socket 1155 not 1366.

I hard that the M4 Crucial is a good ssd drive.
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October 8, 2011 5:48:44 AM

Oh and I forgot to add a question I have.

Can anyone with an SSD tell me what else besides faster boot times, less noise, less heat will an SSD give me? I currently have a HP laptop with a Intel Core 2 Duo @ 1.67GHZ, 4GB RAM, and a 220GB Hitachi 5400RPM HDD. Windows 7 Ultimate 32-bit boots in about 15 seconds on this. I really don't think an SSD is going to lower that more then 5 seconds or so. So really what are the pros unless you also put your applications on that hard drive? Which if I'm correct, lowers the SSD's life span because the more you write/delete on it the short life it has. Correct me if I'm wrong.
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October 8, 2011 5:54:39 AM

cutebeans said:
Samsung Spinpoint.

Your motherboard choice is wrong. It should be socket 1155 not 1366.

I hard that the M4 Crucial is a good ssd drive.



Do you recommend the spinpoint based on personal preference/experience or does it have something that makes it better than the one I selected?

If I'm right, doesn't socket 1366 support i7 processors and my choice for processor was the Intel i7 2600k so shouldn't it work with socket 1366?

EDIT: Never mind I just noticed in the 2600k description it says 1155. Just assumed it being an i7 it worked with 1366. Thank you for correcting that. Looks like I'm going to need to find a new motherboard. Recommendations anyone?
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October 8, 2011 7:00:01 AM

golono said:
Approximate Purchase Date: Mid-November, 2011-December, 2011

Budget: $1600 (Willing to spend a bit more if necessary)

System Usage from Most to Least Important: Gaming, Video Editing/Production, Heavy Multi-tasking, Music, Watch Movies, Browsing)

Parts Not Required: Mouse, Monitor, OS

Preferred Website for Parts: www.newegg.com

Country of Origin: USA

Parts Preferences: Nvidia for graphics, Intel for Processor

Overclocking: In the future

SLI or Crossfire: Maybe in the future

Monitor Resolution: 1920x1080

Additional Comments: This will be my first build and I appreciate the time any takes to give me a recommendation or suggestion. I am open to everyone's opinion or suggestion. I have been doing my research for parts for about two weeks now I have pretty much everything decided but if anyone thinks I should swap something for another item, I'd be glad to hear it.

Parts:

Computer Case : Corsair Special Edition White Graphite Series 600T Will probably purchase from www.compusa.com its about 10 bucks cheaper there.

Motherboard: ASUS P6X58-E PRO LGA 1366 Intel X58

Processor: Intel Core i7-2600K Sandy Bridge

Power Supply: CORSAIR Professional Series HX750 (CMPSU-750HX) 750W

Graphics Card/Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 570

RAM: CORSAIR Vengeance 12GB (3 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600

SSD (For OS): Corsair Force CSSD-F115GB2-BRKT-A 2.5" 115GB

NOTE: Orginally I was going to go with the Intel 320 Series SSDSA2CW080G310 2.5" 80GB but then I found the Corsair Force one and it seems that would go better but I would like to know others opinions on these two.

HDD (For Data): Western Digital Caviar Black WD1002FAEX 1TB 7200 RPM

Optical Drive: SAMSUNG Black 12X BD-ROM 16X DVD-/+R 48X CD-ROM

Keyboard: Microsoft SIDEWINDER X4

NOTE: I plan to mainly use an Xbox 360 Controller to game for all games that support it. Thus, I am not looking for the best keyboard for gaming.


I'd appreciate any ones opinion or suggestions on the parts that I have chosen for my build. Once again, this is my first time building a computer so any suggestions from those who have experience not just on choosing parts but on building as well, is highly appreciated.

That cpu won't work with that board. You want a "socket 1155" board and "DDR3 Dual Channel 1.5v RAM" for that cpu.


http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList.aspx?Submit=E... <---- Z68 boards seeing how you plan on doing video editing along with gaming.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... <---- Best deal going on RAM atm

http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList.aspx?Submit=E... <------ Or one of these sets...skip anything with a RAM cooler though

http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList.aspx?Submit=E... <------ 1600...most popular for price point.

Also you want a 850w psu to push two of those cards in SLI and leave you some headroom.

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October 8, 2011 3:51:30 PM

I would suggest this build for a future proof build as everything is exchangeable in it
call for pricing Cyclone Mircosystems PCIe2-412 backplane
$269.99 x 2 Intel Xeon X3450 Lynnfield 2.66GHz 8MB L3 Cache LGA 1156 95W Quad-Core Server Processor
$79.99 x 1 Western Digital Caviar Black WD1002FAEX 1TB 7200 RPM 64MB Cache SATA 6.0Gb/s 3.5" Internal Hard Drive -Bare Drive
$21.99 x 1 Biostar SATA III 6G b/s 2 port PCI Express Internal Controller Card Model DCS3A
$19.99 x 1 SYBA USB 3.0 PCI-e Card with HDD Power Connector (3 + 1 Ports) Model SD-PEX20080
$169.99 x 2 CORSAIR Professional Series Gold AX650 650W ATX12V v2.31 / EPSV12 v2.92 80 PLUS GOLD Certified Modular Active PFC High Performance Power Supply
$219.99 x 1 GIGABYTE GV-N560UD-1G GeForce GTX 560 Ti (Fermi) 1GB 256-bit GDDR5 PCI Express 2.0 x16 HDCP Ready SLI Support Video Card
$59.99 x 1 Creative SB X-Fi Xtreme Audio 70SB104000000 7.1 Channels PCI Express x1 Interface Sound Card
$96.99 x 1 Allied Telesis AT-2912T-901 10/ 100/ 1000Mbps PCI-Express Gigabit Ethernet Card
you will have to make your own case or mod a sever rackmount for BTX

Total $1318.91 so that leaves enough for the backplane and case to be bought in the left over amount also going with a backplane instead of the traditional motherboad makes it more futureproof as the backplane allows you to just have add-on cards for the functions which you want/need without having to have any of the other 46 lanes taken up by chips which you will never use on the board. This backplane also allow you to have more add-on cards then i listed but this list will get you started with good video, sound and networking all of which have their own processors.

Do not know if the backplane allows for hardware overclocking without software to tell it to do so though i do not think it does but with factory OC'ed parts it should be well enough built that overclocking will not be needed to get the 60+ fps in most games which you can actually see.
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October 8, 2011 4:16:47 PM

yumri said:
I would suggest this build for a future proof build as everything is exchangeable in it
call for pricing Cyclone Mircosystems PCIe2-412 backplane
$269.99 x 2 Intel Xeon X3450 Lynnfield 2.66GHz 8MB L3 Cache LGA 1156 95W Quad-Core Server Processor
$79.99 x 1 Western Digital Caviar Black WD1002FAEX 1TB 7200 RPM 64MB Cache SATA 6.0Gb/s 3.5" Internal Hard Drive -Bare Drive
$21.99 x 1 Biostar SATA III 6G b/s 2 port PCI Express Internal Controller Card Model DCS3A
$19.99 x 1 SYBA USB 3.0 PCI-e Card with HDD Power Connector (3 + 1 Ports) Model SD-PEX20080
$169.99 x 2 CORSAIR Professional Series Gold AX650 650W ATX12V v2.31 / EPSV12 v2.92 80 PLUS GOLD Certified Modular Active PFC High Performance Power Supply
$219.99 x 1 GIGABYTE GV-N560UD-1G GeForce GTX 560 Ti (Fermi) 1GB 256-bit GDDR5 PCI Express 2.0 x16 HDCP Ready SLI Support Video Card
$59.99 x 1 Creative SB X-Fi Xtreme Audio 70SB104000000 7.1 Channels PCI Express x1 Interface Sound Card
$96.99 x 1 Allied Telesis AT-2912T-901 10/ 100/ 1000Mbps PCI-Express Gigabit Ethernet Card
you will have to make your own case or mod a sever rackmount for BTX

Total $1318.91 so that leaves enough for the backplane and case to be bought in the left over amount also going with a backplane instead of the traditional motherboad makes it more futureproof as the backplane allows you to just have add-on cards for the functions which you want/need without having to have any of the other 46 lanes taken up by chips which you will never use on the board. This backplane also allow you to have more add-on cards then i listed but this list will get you started with good video, sound and networking all of which have their own processors.

Do not know if the backplane allows for hardware overclocking without software to tell it to do so though i do not think it does but with factory OC'ed parts it should be well enough built that overclocking will not be needed to get the 60+ fps in most games which you can actually see.



Umm....crazy overkill for a mid-level gaming PC? And:

1. This is way more difficult of a build for a newby than a traditional mobo based computer for not much gain in his proposed uses.
2. Futureproof <> LGA 1156 which has already been virtually legacy'd in favor of 1155
3. 2x 650W PSUs? Is power free where you live?
4. Most modern mobos have all the features you have cards for at much less cost.
5. Come on man, you didn't even include an optical drive...for a newby.
6. No SSD in that price range?

He's not building a server.
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October 8, 2011 4:20:01 PM

The first gen core i7s used LGA 1366 - things with numbers in the 3 digit range like the 920. Anything with a 4 digit part number (2600k for example) is a sandy bridge part and uses LGA 1155 (unless it's the new sandy bridge-e which uses a third socket...but I digress). I think a 2600k paired with a z68 board is an excellent choice.

I'd go with dual channel 8 GB (2x4) - you could got with 12 GB if you want.. Won't help gaming, but might help video work.
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October 8, 2011 5:32:45 PM

Why_Me said:
That cpu won't work with that board. You want a "socket 1155" board and "DDR3 Dual Channel 1.5v RAM" for that cpu.


http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList.aspx?Submit=E... <---- Z68 boards seeing how you plan on doing video editing along with gaming.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... <---- Best deal going on RAM atm

http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList.aspx?Submit=E... <------ Or one of these sets...skip anything with a RAM cooler though

http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList.aspx?Submit=E... <------ 1600...most popular for price point.

Also you want a 850w psu to push two of those cards in SLI and leave you some headroom.



Thanks for the suggestions.
I was thinking an 850w would be better. Will begin to look for an 850w.
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October 8, 2011 5:34:56 PM

yumri said:
I would suggest this build for a future proof build as everything is exchangeable in it
call for pricing Cyclone Mircosystems PCIe2-412 backplane
$269.99 x 2 Intel Xeon X3450 Lynnfield 2.66GHz 8MB L3 Cache LGA 1156 95W Quad-Core Server Processor
$79.99 x 1 Western Digital Caviar Black WD1002FAEX 1TB 7200 RPM 64MB Cache SATA 6.0Gb/s 3.5" Internal Hard Drive -Bare Drive
$21.99 x 1 Biostar SATA III 6G b/s 2 port PCI Express Internal Controller Card Model DCS3A
$19.99 x 1 SYBA USB 3.0 PCI-e Card with HDD Power Connector (3 + 1 Ports) Model SD-PEX20080
$169.99 x 2 CORSAIR Professional Series Gold AX650 650W ATX12V v2.31 / EPSV12 v2.92 80 PLUS GOLD Certified Modular Active PFC High Performance Power Supply
$219.99 x 1 GIGABYTE GV-N560UD-1G GeForce GTX 560 Ti (Fermi) 1GB 256-bit GDDR5 PCI Express 2.0 x16 HDCP Ready SLI Support Video Card
$59.99 x 1 Creative SB X-Fi Xtreme Audio 70SB104000000 7.1 Channels PCI Express x1 Interface Sound Card
$96.99 x 1 Allied Telesis AT-2912T-901 10/ 100/ 1000Mbps PCI-Express Gigabit Ethernet Card
you will have to make your own case or mod a sever rackmount for BTX

Total $1318.91 so that leaves enough for the backplane and case to be bought in the left over amount also going with a backplane instead of the traditional motherboad makes it more futureproof as the backplane allows you to just have add-on cards for the functions which you want/need without having to have any of the other 46 lanes taken up by chips which you will never use on the board. This backplane also allow you to have more add-on cards then i listed but this list will get you started with good video, sound and networking all of which have their own processors.

Do not know if the backplane allows for hardware overclocking without software to tell it to do so though i do not think it does but with factory OC'ed parts it should be well enough built that overclocking will not be needed to get the 60+ fps in most games which you can actually see.


Woah.. Yeah I have to agree with Inanition02. I do want a computer that is ready for future games but this is my first build and I don't want to make things complicated on a first build. Thanks anyway.
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October 8, 2011 6:45:28 PM

Some points:
1) Server CPU? Uh. No.

2) PSU. it's not just the Wattage. Look at the AMPS. I believe a single GTX570 needs 38A so get a PSU with at least 48Amps (on the +12V rail). It is sometimes a COMBINED value (don't just add up the rails).

3) RAM?
12GB is way too much. It'll just create waste heat. 8GB is plenty. You'd notice very little over 4GB with an SSD installed.

4) case. I love my Antec 100. It was inexpensive, came with two fans and a nice tray on top. *Note: the instructions did not tell me the entire front unclips. You need to know that. You can also tuck cables in the right side of the case. Very tidy.
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October 8, 2011 7:13:16 PM

My ROUGH recommendation. CANADIAN NCIX LINKS (USA SITE MISSING DIRECTORY?):

LGA1155 system:
1) Antec 100 case
2) motherboard
http://www.ncix.ca/products/?sku=61183&vpn=P8Z68-V%20PR...

3) CPU (2500K. K means unlocked)
http://www.ncix.ca/products/?sku=57962&vpn=BX80623I5250...

4) RAM (8GB DDR3. Lots of choices. example:) 
http://www.ncix.ca/products/?sku=57953&vpn=F3-12800CL9D...

5) CPU heatsink: (recommend 92mm fan, facing REAR. 120mm heatsinks are overkill.)
http://www.ncix.ca/products/?sku=51106&vpn=CNPS10X%20Pe...

6) PSU
http://www.ncix.ca/products/?sku=36264&vpn=TP-750&manuf...

7) Windows 7 Premium 64-bit OEM

8) DVD burner:
http://www.ncix.ca/products/?sku=60857&vpn=GH24NS70&man...

9) Drives?
a) SSD (Windows) + Hard Drive (games, downloads, media etc), or
b) 2 Hard drives (so you can BACKUP the main drive).
- if SSD for Windows, get 120GB (60GB not enough)
- backup Windows using Acronis True Image (if you have a Western Digital drive, get the free Acronis TI software from their site to create an Image of the Windows partition)

- SSD example: 120GB Vertex 3
- hard drives: WD 1TB or 2GB GREEN

10) Graphics card:
http://www.ncix.ca/products/?sku=59632&vpn=N570GTX%20Tw...

Other:
- Virtu probably won't be needed or used, but it's part of the new motherboards. it's best to get the new motherboards as there are issues with the 1155 that can be difficult to avoid if you don't know what to look for (PCIe bandwidth for one).

*Make sure you check all this for compatibility, remember they're Canadian links, and good luck!
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October 8, 2011 11:29:21 PM

photonboy said:
My ROUGH recommendation. CANADIAN NCIX LINKS (USA SITE MISSING DIRECTORY?):

LGA1155 system:
1) Antec 100 case
2) motherboard
http://www.ncix.ca/products/?sku=61183&vpn=P8Z68-V%20PR...

3) CPU (2500K. K means unlocked)
http://www.ncix.ca/products/?sku=57962&vpn=BX80623I5250...

4) RAM (8GB DDR3. Lots of choices. example:) 
http://www.ncix.ca/products/?sku=57953&vpn=F3-12800CL9D...

5) CPU heatsink: (recommend 92mm fan, facing REAR. 120mm heatsinks are overkill.)
http://www.ncix.ca/products/?sku=51106&vpn=CNPS10X%20Pe...

6) PSU
http://www.ncix.ca/products/?sku=36264&vpn=TP-750&manuf...

7) Windows 7 Premium 64-bit OEM

8) DVD burner:
http://www.ncix.ca/products/?sku=60857&vpn=GH24NS70&man...

9) Drives?
a) SSD (Windows) + Hard Drive (games, downloads, media etc), or
b) 2 Hard drives (so you can BACKUP the main drive).
- if SSD for Windows, get 120GB (60GB not enough)
- backup Windows using Acronis True Image (if you have a Western Digital drive, get the free Acronis TI software from their site to create an Image of the Windows partition)

- SSD example: 120GB Vertex 3
- hard drives: WD 1TB or 2GB GREEN

10) Graphics card:
http://www.ncix.ca/products/?sku=59632&vpn=N570GTX%20Tw...

Other:
- Virtu probably won't be needed or used, but it's part of the new motherboards. it's best to get the new motherboards as there are issues with the 1155 that can be difficult to avoid if you don't know what to look for (PCIe bandwidth for one).

*Make sure you check all this for compatibility, remember they're Canadian links, and good luck!


Funny I was looking in to the same motherboard you suggested.
Yeah I was going with 12GB as overkill. Will go with 8GB instead.

Part Updates:

Motherboard: ASUS P8Z68-V PRO LGA 1155 Intel Z68

RAM: CORSAIR Vengeance 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800)

I heard the 2600k doesn't support higher than 1333 Mhz. I don't know if this is true or not but does that mean that I can't use these at 1600 Mhz? Or higher if O.C.?

Thanks for all the help
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October 9, 2011 12:12:44 AM

golono said:
Funny I was looking in to the same motherboard you suggested.
Yeah I was going with 12GB as overkill. Will go with 8GB instead.

Part Updates:

Motherboard: ASUS P8Z68-V PRO LGA 1155 Intel Z68

RAM: CORSAIR Vengeance 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800)

I heard the 2600k doesn't support higher than 1333 Mhz. I don't know if this is true or not but does that mean that I can't use these at 1600 Mhz? Or higher if O.C.?

Thanks for all the help

Most all 1155 P67 and Z68 boards support up to 2133hz RAM. 1333 is the lowest it supports. Also I would lose that RAM with the cake cutter heat spreaders unless you plan on using them to comb your hair. Those heat spreaders are going to screw you when you go to add an after market cpu h/s.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... <---- Pretty much the same board as the Pro...just cost less.

http://www.asrock.com/microsite/PCIe3/ <----- the hot selling boards atm. They have those PCI-E 3.0 slots.

http://www.asrock.com/mb/index.asp?s=1155 <---- the boards that say Gen3 next to their name.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList.aspx?Submit=E... <---- those same boards on there.
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October 9, 2011 1:17:45 AM

Why_Me said:
Most all 1155 P67 and Z68 boards support up to 2133hz RAM. 1333 is the lowest it supports. Also I would lose that RAM with the cake cutter heat spreaders unless you plan on using them to comb your hair. Those heat spreaders are going to screw you when you go to add an after market cpu h/s.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... <---- Pretty much the same board as the Pro...just cost less.

http://www.asrock.com/microsite/PCIe3/ <----- the hot selling boards atm. They have those PCI-E 3.0 slots.

http://www.asrock.com/mb/index.asp?s=1155 <---- the boards that say Gen3 next to their name.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList.aspx?Submit=E... <---- those same boards on there.


I just remembered reading about the Corsair Vengeance RAM Cards blocking the cpu heatsink (unless its the standard one). Thank you for the reminder.
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October 9, 2011 1:52:27 AM

I have a question. I was wondering if I should get a low memory SSD along with the 1 TB HDD and use Intel's SRT or stick with my current plan and get a 115GB for the OS. And if I do get a 115GB SSD, would putting games on it lessen its life drastically? Because I do remember reading something about the more you write/delete on an SSD the shorter life it has or something along those lines.
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October 9, 2011 2:36:04 AM

golono said:
I have a question. I was wondering if I should get a low memory SSD along with the 1 TB HDD and use Intel's SRT or stick with my current plan and get a 115GB for the OS. And if I do get a 115GB SSD, would putting games on it lessen its life drastically? Because I do remember reading something about the more you write/delete on an SSD the shorter life it has or something along those lines.

I haven't heard of constant reading and writing on SSD's shortening the life span. It might, I just haven't seen anything or heard anything about it. With your budget the usual is a 120/128GB SSD and a 1TB h/d...usually a Samsung, Seagate, or WD. Peeps put the o/s, desktop, and a few games and/or proggy's on the SSD and the rest on the storage drive. That way when your in game your maps load up fast.
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October 9, 2011 3:11:57 AM

Why_Me said:
I haven't heard of constant reading and writing on SSD's shortening the life span. It might, I just haven't seen anything or heard anything about it. With your budget the usual is a 120/128GB SSD and a 1TB h/d...usually a Samsung, Seagate, or WD. Peeps put the o/s, desktop, and a few games and/or proggy's on the SSD and the rest on the storage drive. That way when your in game your maps load up fast.



Found where I saw the limited writes.

"Flash-based SSDs have a limited number of writes (1-5 million or more) over the life of the drive. Software controllers manage this limitation in such a way that drives can last for many decades before failure. SSDs based on DRAM do not have a limited number of writes."

I didn't notice the last sentence when I first read it. I guess it only affects flash drives. Not a problem for me to worry about then.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solid-state_drive#Comparis...

Scroll down to Write longevity.
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October 9, 2011 3:22:50 AM

Another question. Should I consider getting a sound card? If so what should I be looking for? I listen to music every now and then and I do enjoy getting good audio both gaming and just general music.
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October 9, 2011 3:36:52 AM

golono said:
Another question. Should I consider getting a sound card? If so what should I be looking for? I listen to music every now and then and I do enjoy getting good audio both gaming and just general music.

I would try the onboard sound first. Chances are after listening to it you aren't going to want to get a sound card.
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October 9, 2011 5:37:26 AM

Why_Me said:
I would try the onboard sound first. Chances are after listening to it you aren't going to want to get a sound card.


+1.
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October 9, 2011 8:10:21 AM

1) SSD
- Get a 120GB SSD, such as the OCZ Vertex 3 or Agility 3 (look for sales). 60GB will not be enough after Microsoft Updates, System Restore points etc. I thought it would be, installed my games etc to a hard drive, but then ran out of space eventually and had to get a second 60GB SSD (RAID0). Do NOT RAID. There's no TRIM support.

2) SSD lifespan and games?
Once installed, games mainly READ (load) from the drive their on. It's the WRITE's that are an issue. If your Windows drive is an SSD, that's usually where the SAVE games are stored (Steam has some Saves in its folder, and some on the Windows drive).

However, the number of writes for games is far, far, far lower than is an issue for an SSD.

The PAGEFILE, HIBERFILE, and Internet Browser updates are of more concern, but SSD's have a wear levelling algorithm to automatically block sections once written too. Basically leave at least 20% free on your SSD (can free it up later too). Your SSD will SLOWLY lose space over time (should take years).

The entire WRITING thing is basically a non-issue. By the time your drive has shrunk by, say, 20% it will probably be several years and the price of a replacement for a much faster SSD would be far, far cheaper.

3) Sound card.
There's a HUGE difference in sound if you have good speakers. I dislike surround sound (5.1) with rear speakers because it's almost impossible to setup properly and also the wires. That leaves STEREO (2.0) or 2.1 (stereo + subwoofer)

The advantage of STEREO over 2.1 is that there's no subwoofer and the bass vibration won't carry throughout the house (especially the room below). If I was in a basement, or it was otherwise a non-issue, I'd go with a 2.1 setup. Read reviews carefully.

I love my M-Audio AV40 stereo speakers. They're a nice compromise. They're large with 4" bass/mid drivers so they're about the best bass you can get with stereo.

So..
Do not buy expensive speakers with only onboard sound and vice versa. For onboard sound I recommend about $50 for stereo and roughly $100 for 2.1.

4) Which sound card?
Don't spend much more than $100. Also, decide on PCI or PCIe. Probably doesn't matter for most people, but many motherboards have a spare PCI slot I'd never use for anything else. Whatever.

I'm not up on prices. I'm happy with my Auzentech Forte. It was redesigned and fixed. In general, EAX is getting to be a non-issue.

So, I would look for a roughly $100 sound card from:
1) Auzentech,
2) Asus, or
3) Creative

To be clear, there was a HUGE difference between my Realtek (889?) onboard audio and my Auzentech Forte when combined with my M-Audio AV40 speakers.
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October 9, 2011 10:29:26 PM

photonboy said:
1) SSD
- Get a 120GB SSD, such as the OCZ Vertex 3 or Agility 3 (look for sales). 60GB will not be enough after Microsoft Updates, System Restore points etc. I thought it would be, installed my games etc to a hard drive, but then ran out of space eventually and had to get a second 60GB SSD (RAID0). Do NOT RAID. There's no TRIM support.

2) SSD lifespan and games?
Once installed, games mainly READ (load) from the drive their on. It's the WRITE's that are an issue. If your Windows drive is an SSD, that's usually where the SAVE games are stored (Steam has some Saves in its folder, and some on the Windows drive).

However, the number of writes for games is far, far, far lower than is an issue for an SSD.

The PAGEFILE, HIBERFILE, and Internet Browser updates are of more concern, but SSD's have a wear levelling algorithm to automatically block sections once written too. Basically leave at least 20% free on your SSD (can free it up later too). Your SSD will SLOWLY lose space over time (should take years).

The entire WRITING thing is basically a non-issue. By the time your drive has shrunk by, say, 20% it will probably be several years and the price of a replacement for a much faster SSD would be far, far cheaper.

3) Sound card.
There's a HUGE difference in sound if you have good speakers. I dislike surround sound (5.1) with rear speakers because it's almost impossible to setup properly and also the wires. That leaves STEREO (2.0) or 2.1 (stereo + subwoofer)

The advantage of STEREO over 2.1 is that there's no subwoofer and the bass vibration won't carry throughout the house (especially the room below). If I was in a basement, or it was otherwise a non-issue, I'd go with a 2.1 setup. Read reviews carefully.

I love my M-Audio AV40 stereo speakers. They're a nice compromise. They're large with 4" bass/mid drivers so they're about the best bass you can get with stereo.

So..
Do not buy expensive speakers with only onboard sound and vice versa. For onboard sound I recommend about $50 for stereo and roughly $100 for 2.1.

4) Which sound card?
Don't spend much more than $100. Also, decide on PCI or PCIe. Probably doesn't matter for most people, but many motherboards have a spare PCI slot I'd never use for anything else. Whatever.

I'm not up on prices. I'm happy with my Auzentech Forte. It was redesigned and fixed. In general, EAX is getting to be a non-issue.

So, I would look for a roughly $100 sound card from:
1) Auzentech,
2) Asus, or
3) Creative

To be clear, there was a HUGE difference between my Realtek (889?) onboard audio and my Auzentech Forte when combined with my M-Audio AV40 speakers.


Thank you for all the information in your post. I will keep all this in mind when I build the computer.
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October 9, 2011 10:35:14 PM

I have been wondering about my cpu's heatsink. When I get all the parts, should I just buy and install a better heatsink instead of the included one? Or should I wait until I eventually decide to overclock? Also, should I consider water cooling for the CPU? Or is it not worth the risk/price.
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October 9, 2011 11:04:34 PM

golono said:
I have been wondering about my cpu's heatsink. When I get all the parts, should I just buy and install a better heatsink instead of the included one? Or should I wait until I eventually decide to overclock? Also, should I consider water cooling for the CPU? Or is it not worth the risk/price.

I would definitely get that h/s now so you don't have to mess with it later on. This one down below is new to the market and will get you to 4.4ghz - 4.6ghz even though anything past 4.4ghz doesn't give you any substantial gain in regards to FPS. This h/s also comes with excellent thermal compound and it allows you to add another fan to it for a "push - pull" effect.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... $34.99 FREE SHIPPING
COOLER MASTER Hyper 212 EVO RR-212E-20PK-R1 Continuous Direct Contact 120mm Sleeve CPU Cooler Compatible with latest Intel 1366/1155 and AMD FM1/AM3+
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October 10, 2011 2:12:06 AM

1) Heatsink. I agree, get it now. It will have a QUIETER fan than the stock one, even when in IDLE mode.

*Make sure that:
a) your CPU fan is connected to the CPU_FAN on your motherboard.
b) your BIOS must have this feature enabled
c) If your fan does not vary its speed your BIOS setting may be incorrect. For example, I needed "Voltage" but it was set to "AUTO" which locked my CPU fan at 100% (it probably chose "PWM").

If your CPU fan speeds up when stressing the CPU you're setup correctly.

2) Water cooling. I recommend staying away completely. It's not that easy to setup correctly.
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October 11, 2011 5:24:18 AM

Why_Me said:
I would definitely get that h/s now so you don't have to mess with it later on. This one down below is new to the market and will get you to 4.4ghz - 4.6ghz even though anything past 4.4ghz doesn't give you any substantial gain in regards to FPS. This h/s also comes with excellent thermal compound and it allows you to add another fan to it for a "push - pull" effect.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... $34.99 FREE SHIPPING
COOLER MASTER Hyper 212 EVO RR-212E-20PK-R1 Continuous Direct Contact 120mm Sleeve CPU Cooler Compatible with latest Intel 1366/1155 and AMD FM1/AM3+



Thank you for the recommendation. Its a good price and looks like it will do its job well. Will go with it.
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October 11, 2011 5:25:13 AM

photonboy said:
1) Heatsink. I agree, get it now. It will have a QUIETER fan than the stock one, even when in IDLE mode.

*Make sure that:
a) your CPU fan is connected to the CPU_FAN on your motherboard.
b) your BIOS must have this feature enabled
c) If your fan does not vary its speed your BIOS setting may be incorrect. For example, I needed "Voltage" but it was set to "AUTO" which locked my CPU fan at 100% (it probably chose "PWM").

If your CPU fan speeds up when stressing the CPU you're setup correctly.

2) Water cooling. I recommend staying away completely. It's not that easy to setup correctly.



Thanks, I will keep that in mind.
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October 11, 2011 6:10:45 AM

Hi, I have a couple of observations:

1. Stick with the Corsair HX 850. I own it and you won't find a better PSU for less. It frequently goes on sale for $140 or less on Newegg or Amazon

2. I own the AsRock Extreme 4 Gen 3 Motherboard which was recommended as one option by Why Me. I really like the board and I can recommend it. Get a motherboard that support PCI-E 3.0 and Ivy bridge. They don't cost that much more and you will be able to upgrade them if you want.

3. I would suggest the Noctua NH-D14 cooler if your budget allows. It is the best air-cooler for the money IMO. It stays quiet and out-cools just about every other CPU cooler on the market except the water cooled H100 and dedicated water cool setups. It frequently goes on sale for $75 on Amazon or Newegg

4. For a 2.1 speaker system you cannot beat the quality of the Corsair SP2500 2.1 speaker system. It is simply the best 2.1 system for the money. They put my $2000 Harmon Kardon 5.1 system to shame (I bought the SP2500s for a relative and I was blown away by their clean sound).

5. I own the Xonar DX 7.1 sound card and I am not sure that it is a great improvement over a good motherboard integrated sound card. It does produce a much cleaner sound which is valuable but you have to have good speakers to notice it

6. Change your SSD to the Kingston Extreme or the Muskin Chronos Deluxe or the Patriot Wildfire or the Corsair Force 3 GT (emphasize the GT) if you can get it on sale. These are the best 120 GB SSDs for the money. Right now I think the Corsair GT or the Kingston Extreme are the cheapest and the Mushkin is hands down the fastest - it beats many 240 GB drives. Don't get less than a 120GB SSD. The Crucial M4 is also worth looking at.

7. I own the Corsair 650D case and I would highly recommend it. The new Carbide 500 also looks like an amazing case and it is cheaper. I think that the 500 will cool better than the 650D but it may be louder also.

8. Go with 1866 2 x 4GB RAM CL9 or CL8, it frequently goes on sale for $65 at Newegg. You can't beat it for the price. Gskill or Corsair are good brands

9. I own the Samsung F3 Spinpoint and I can recommend it hardily. It is a very fast HDD and it goes on sale for $50 all the time

10. the 2600K CPU is better if you are going to do video editing (better than the
2500K)

11. I like your combo optical drive, however the Asus blu-ray burner goes on sale at Newegg all the time for $80. If you need to burn a large file it is useful to have a blu-ray burner

Good luck :-)

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October 11, 2011 9:20:20 AM

flong said:
Hi, I have a couple of observations:

1. Stick with the Corsair HX 850. I own it and you won't find a better PSU for less. It frequently goes on sale for $140 or less on Newegg or Amazon

2. I own the AsRock Extreme 4 Gen 3 Motherboard which was recommended as one option by Why Me. I really like the board and I can recommend it. Get a motherboard that support PCI-E 3.0 and Ivy bridge. They don't cost that much more and you will be able to upgrade them if you want.

3. I would suggest the Noctua NH-D14 cooler if your budget allows. It is the best air-cooler for the money IMO. It stays quiet and out-cools just about every other CPU cooler on the market except the water cooled H100 and dedicated water cool setups. It frequently goes on sale for $75 on Amazon or Newegg

4. For a 2.1 speaker system you cannot beat the quality of the Corsair SP2500 2.1 speaker system. It is simply the best 2.1 system for the money. They put my $2000 Harmon Kardon 5.1 system to shame (I bought the SP2500s for a relative and I was blown away by their clean sound).

5. I own the Xonar DX 7.1 sound card and I am not sure that it is a great improvement over a good motherboard integrated sound card. It does produce a much cleaner sound which is valuable but you have to have good speakers to notice it

6. Change your SSD to the Kingston Extreme or the Muskin Chronos Deluxe or the Patriot Wildfire or the Corsair Force 3 GT (emphasize the GT) if you can get it on sale. These are the best 120 GB SSDs for the money. Right now I think the Corsair GT or the Kingston Extreme are the cheapest and the Mushkin is hands down the fastest - it beats many 240 GB drives. Don't get less than a 120GB SSD. The Crucial M4 is also worth looking at.

7. I own the Corsair 650D case and I would highly recommend it. The new Carbide 500 also looks like an amazing case and it is cheaper. I think that the 500 will cool better than the 650D but it may be louder also.

8. Go with 1866 2 x 4GB RAM CL9 or CL8, it frequently goes on sale for $65 at Newegg. You can't beat it for the price. Gskill or Corsair are good brands

9. I own the Samsung F3 Spinpoint and I can recommend it hardily. It is a very fast HDD and it goes on sale for $50 all the time

10. the 2600K CPU is better if you are going to do video editing (better than the
2500K)

11. I like your combo optical drive, however the Asus blu-ray burner goes on sale at Newegg all the time for $80. If you need to burn a large file it is useful to have a blu-ray burner

Good luck :-)


1. Yeah the specs look good and no one has reported any major issue. That 7 year warranty sounds good as well.

2. I was taking a look at that board and it has me wondering if I should get that instead of the ASUS P8Z68-V PRO. Most people who I have asked recommend me a Z68 board. Not sure which I'm going to go with..

3. Yeah I heard of this one. I will keep an eye on it and see if maybe I could squeeze it in the budget.

4. They look awesome and have good reviews but pricey. I think I will probably just get a headset. I was looking at the Corsair HS1. Looks durable and comfortable and I might be able to get it free.

5. Just to not go over the budget too much, I think I will stick with whatever my motherboard gives me.

6. I noticed the Corsair Force 3 GT has pretty much twice the speed the SSD I was going to with. Will more than likely swap that to the Force 3 GT.

7. I'm not exactly sure why but the black computer cases seem dull to me in a way. Not sure why I actually would normally prefer them in that color. I don't usually care much about looks as much I do on durability when it comes to items in general but the white 600t seems appealing to me and looks like it will do good. Also, I have a question on that 650D case. Does it have two USB 3.0 ports on the front? In the pictures, I see two USB 3.0 ports yet in the description it says it only has one.

8. I've been looking at these G.SKILL Sniper Series 8GB

9. I Will take a look at it.

10. Yeah that is why I chose the 2600k

11. I don't really burn much which is why I didn't go with a Blu-ray burner. I could always use DL for larger files if I needed to. I know Blu-ray discs offer a lot more memory but if I need to keep large files, I usually just pass them over to my external hard drive.

Thank you for all your help.
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October 11, 2011 9:23:11 AM

I am also going to need a headset and I've been scanning through a couple and so far the one that has my attention is the Corsair HS1
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October 11, 2011 5:03:07 PM

Hi, some followup:

1. Go with a Z68 motherboard that is ready for Ivy Bridge and supports PCI-E 3.0 - they are not that expensive (AsRock has great buys)

2. I think that your choice of the Carbide 500 is perfect for your build

3. If you wait for a sale you can get the SP 2500 speakers for around $170 with free shipping. Newegg puts them on sale regularly as does Amazon

4. The 600T does support USB 3.0 and it is a very good case. It will be quieter than the Carbide 500 but not cool as well. The Carbide comes in white also I think.

5. That Gskill 1866 RAM is fine. If you can wait for a sale you may get it for less. RAM is going down in price overall.

6. Newegg regularly puts the Samsung f3 Spinpoint on sale for $50 with free shipping. It is a very fast HDD

7. I own the Corsair Force 3 GT 120GB and it is a great SSD. However, the Kingston Extreme and the Muskin Chronos Deluxe are faster. The Mushkin Deluxe is the baddest 120 GB SSD on the market right now. It beats several 240 GB SSDs which is amazing. However it is about $50 more than the other two.
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October 11, 2011 9:41:51 PM

Noctua DH14 heatsink:

I OWN this and I think it is overkill. It has TWO fans. I unhooked BOTH fans and was able to run my i7-860 (about same as the 920) stressed to 100% (stock speed) and it was in the 50deg C range.

I currently have only one fan running. It's your choice but I recommend one of the 92mm fans with a smaller heatsink that costs roughly $40 .

USB3 case support:

If you want to have FRONT CASE USB SUPPORT, you must have BOTH these things:
1) Case supports front USB (the case USB wires need to be good enough for up to 600MB/second transfer speeds)

2) Motherboard supports USB3 on the on-board output for the front case, NOT just the rear USB outputs (I have rear USB3 but only USB2 for the case. However my case doesn't support this so I'd likely get transfer errors at higher speeds if I tried to use an addon PCIe card for USB3 to my case)
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October 12, 2011 4:32:34 AM

flong said:
Hi, some followup:

1. Go with a Z68 motherboard that is ready for Ivy Bridge and supports PCI-E 3.0 - they are not that expensive (AsRock has great buys)

2. I think that your choice of the Carbide 500 is perfect for your build

3. If you wait for a sale you can get the SP 2500 speakers for around $170 with free shipping. Newegg puts them on sale regularly as does Amazon

4. The 600T does support USB 3.0 and it is a very good case. It will be quieter than the Carbide 500 but not cool as well. The Carbide comes in white also I think.

5. That Gskill 1866 RAM is fine. If you can wait for a sale you may get it for less. RAM is going down in price overall.

6. Newegg regularly puts the Samsung f3 Spinpoint on sale for $50 with free shipping. It is a very fast HDD

7. I own the Corsair Force 3 GT 120GB and it is a great SSD. However, the Kingston Extreme and the Muskin Chronos Deluxe are faster. The Mushkin Deluxe is the baddest 120 GB SSD on the market right now. It beats several 240 GB SSDs which is amazing. However it is about $50 more than the other two.



Alright thanks.
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October 12, 2011 4:38:30 AM

photonboy said:
Noctua DH14 heatsink:

I OWN this and I think it is overkill. It has TWO fans. I unhooked BOTH fans and was able to run my i7-860 (about same as the 920) stressed to 100% (stock speed) and it was in the 50deg C range.

I currently have only one fan running. It's your choice but I recommend one of the 92mm fans with a smaller heatsink that costs roughly $40 .

USB3 case support:

If you want to have FRONT CASE USB SUPPORT, you must have BOTH these things:
1) Case supports front USB (the case USB wires need to be good enough for up to 600MB/second transfer speeds)

2) Motherboard supports USB3 on the on-board output for the front case, NOT just the rear USB outputs (I have rear USB3 but only USB2 for the case. However my case doesn't support this so I'd likely get transfer errors at higher speeds if I tried to use an addon PCIe card for USB3 to my case)



Yeah it seems like overkill. I was considering going with this COOLER MASTER Hyper 212 EVO


Thanks for the info.
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October 12, 2011 5:37:36 AM

I was considering going with the ASRock Z68 EXTREME4 GEN3 instead of my current choice ( ASUS P8Z68-V PRO ). The ASRock would give me PCI express 3.0 and a couple more USB ports ( dont need more USB ports but I dont mind having more) for a lower price. Only cons on the ASRock board are the warranty is only 2 years compared to the ASUS board that has a 3 year and I've also heard ASRock doesn't have very good customer support. I was also taking a look at this board ASRock Z68 PROFESSIONAL GEN3
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October 12, 2011 7:57:50 AM

photonboy said:
Noctua DH14 heatsink:

I OWN this and I think it is overkill. It has TWO fans. I unhooked BOTH fans and was able to run my i7-860 (about same as the 920) stressed to 100% (stock speed) and it was in the 50deg C range.

I currently have only one fan running. It's your choice but I recommend one of the 92mm fans with a smaller heatsink that costs roughly $40 .

USB3 case support:

If you want to have FRONT CASE USB SUPPORT, you must have BOTH these things:
1) Case supports front USB (the case USB wires need to be good enough for up to 600MB/second transfer speeds)

2) Motherboard supports USB3 on the on-board output for the front case, NOT just the rear USB outputs (I have rear USB3 but only USB2 for the case. However my case doesn't support this so I'd likely get transfer errors at higher speeds if I tried to use an addon PCIe card for USB3 to my case)


I own the Noctua NH-D14 also - thank you for confirming my recommendation that it is a terrific cooler. Yeah anybody can buy the cheapo Hyper 212 but you get Kmart quality and no where near the cooling performance of the D14. The d14 is a cooling beast. Now I am not putting down Hyper 212 owners, if it is all you can afford it is certainly a decent cooler, especially for the price. It handily beats the stock Intel cooler.

Why you would not want your computer to be as cool as possible is beyond me as the D-14 is very quiet on full fan. So why you disconnected one of your fans and are running your system hotter is really inexplicable and not very bright (yes I know your are safely within Intel's specs but that is not the point). Every computer expert in the world will tell you that running your system as cool as possible is the optimum choice. This is why you see "cool rooms" for industry computers everywhere. The pros have learned that if they can keep all the components icy cool - they last longer and don't break down as much.

My system (2600K) runs below 40C under load and I could not be happier. My case fans on the Corsair 650D are the loudest component in the system and I cannot hear the dual fans in D14 over the case fans. I guess if your a silence purist, then taking off one of the fans makes some sort of sense. These cool temps help my entire system and promote reliability and longevity.

Concerning price, this is a $1600 build not a $500 build and we are talking about approximately a $45 cost difference - this is chump change on this build. I am so tired of recommendations that new builders go "cheap" on what may be the second most important component in the computer - the CPU cooler. Granted the Sandy Bridge processors do run cooler than the I-7 9xx (1366), however that is not an excuse to cheap-out on cooling.

The CM Hyper 212 has reached cult status as a cheap cooler ($35) but you get what you pay for. It has several problems that are listed in the professional reviews. Other cheaper coolers also have a litany of problems with cheap, weak mounting systems being one of the most cited.

Yeah if it is a young kid with a $500 budget, then I can see something like the 212 being acceptable as that is all they can afford. But on higher end builds, buy the cooler that will protect your components the best - spend the extra $40. I promise you the sky won't fall.

Now before you regale us that a $40 cooler will get the job done remember that the OP is going to overclock. That being the case, the CPU cooler does become an extremely important factor in a successful, safe, stable overclock. The $40 cooler won't even be in the same league as the NH-D14 when serious heat becomes an issue and the Sandy Bridge processors do put out serious heat when overclocked.
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October 12, 2011 7:59:19 AM

golono said:
I was considering going with the ASRock Z68 EXTREME4 GEN3 instead of my current choice ( ASUS P8Z68-V PRO ). The ASRock would give me PCI express 3.0 and a couple more USB ports ( dont need more USB ports but I dont mind having more) for a lower price. Only cons on the ASRock board are the warranty is only 2 years compared to the ASUS board that has a 3 year and I've also heard ASRock doesn't have very good customer support. I was also taking a look at this board ASRock Z68 PROFESSIONAL GEN3


Just a quick note, I had an Asus board that went bad and Asus's customer is among the worst I have ever experienced. It was just sad.
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October 12, 2011 8:10:17 AM

I knew I had seen the Carbide in white: here is the link to Newegg - http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Wow, cool it looks like the door is on hinges (not sure). Nope I don't think so. This is one amazingly good looking case and it should be the best cooling Corsair case available because of the side fan.
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October 12, 2011 10:22:42 AM

flong said:
I own the Noctua NH-D14 also - thank you for confirming my recommendation that it is a terrific cooler. Yeah anybody can buy the cheapo Hyper 212 but you get Kmart quality and no where near the cooling performance of the D14. The d14 is a cooling beast. Now I am not putting down Hyper 212 owners, if it is all you can afford it is certainly a decent cooler, especially for the price. It handily beats the stock Intel cooler.

Why you would not want your computer to be as cool as possible is beyond me as the D-14 is very quiet on full fan. So why you disconnected one of your fans and are running your system hotter is really inexplicable and not very bright (yes I know your are safely within Intel's specs but that is not the point). Every computer expert in the world will tell you that running your system as cool as possible is the optimum choice. This is why you see "cool rooms" for industry computers everywhere. The pros have learned that if they can keep all the components icy cool - they last longer and don't break down as much.

My system (2600K) runs below 40C under load and I could not be happier. My case fans on the Corsair 650D are the loudest component in the system and I cannot hear the dual fans in D14 over the case fans. I guess if your a silence purist, then taking off one of the fans makes some sort of sense. These cool temps help my entire system and promote reliability and longevity.

Concerning price, this is a $1600 build not a $500 build and we are talking about approximately a $45 cost difference - this is chump change on this build. I am so tired of recommendations that new builders go "cheap" on what may be the second most important component in the computer - the CPU cooler. Granted the Sandy Bridge processors do run cooler than the I-7 9xx (1366), however that is not an excuse to cheap-out on cooling.

The CM Hyper 212 has reached cult status as a cheap cooler ($35) but you get what you pay for. It has several problems that are listed in the professional reviews. Other cheaper coolers also have a litany of problems with cheap, weak mounting systems being one of the most cited.

Yeah if it is a young kid with a $500 budget, then I can see something like the 212 being acceptable as that is all they can afford. But on higher end builds, buy the cooler that will protect your components the best - spend the extra $40. I promise you the sky won't fall.

Now before you regale us that a $40 cooler will get the job done remember that the OP is going to overclock. That being the case, the CPU cooler does become an extremely important factor in a successful, safe, stable overclock. The $40 cooler won't even be in the same league as the NH-D14 when serious heat becomes an issue and the Sandy Bridge processors do put out serious heat when overclocked.



I understand your point. After all, the processor is one of the most expensive parts so what you get to keep it cool does matter. I should probably go with something better than the Hyper 212... But I'm not sure if I would go with D-14. I've heard that for some motherboards, it partially blocks the RAM card slots. Which is why I wanted to ask you if you use the D-14 with the Extreme 4 Gen 3.
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October 12, 2011 10:24:40 AM

flong said:
I knew I had seen the Carbide in white: here is the link to Newegg - http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Wow, cool it looks like the door is on hinges (not sure). Nope I don't think so. This is one amazingly good looking case and it should be the best cooling Corsair case available because of the side fan.


I was looking at the Carbide cases couple of days back. They seem to be good but I think I might just stick with the 600t series.
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October 12, 2011 4:01:37 PM

golono said:
I understand your point. After all, the processor is one of the most expensive parts so what you get to keep it cool does matter. I should probably go with something better than the Hyper 212... But I'm not sure if I would go with D-14. I've heard that for some motherboards, it partially blocks the RAM card slots. Which is why I wanted to ask you if you use the D-14 with the Extreme 4 Gen 3.


It is so large that it does come close to blocking the first PCI-E slot but it will fit over most RAM. On Noctua's website they have an excellent compatibility page that shows exactly which RAM sets will work. I think the only major brand that doesn't work might be Corsair because they stick up so high.

If the Noctua D-14 is not what you are looking for, you may want to look at the Corsair H100 self enclosed water cooler. It comes pre-built and is easy to install (you don't have to build the water loop). It is the best CPU cooler available but it costs about $125. For overclocking, it cannot be beat. Make sure that the 600T case is compatible - I think that it is. It will say on Corsair's website. Also it does not get in the way of RAM or PCI-E slots.

For the 600T the D-14 may be the better choice because it exhausts hot air out of the case. The H100, depending on how you set it up, can exhaust hot air into the case. The 600T has no side fan to help push air. Thus the D-14 may be the better choice if that makes sense.

The 600T is definitely a great case but you will need a quality CPU cooler because the case is about medium in the cooling department. I own the Corsair 650D case and its cooling is similar (the 650D is a little better).
The benefit of the 600T case is that it is very high quality, easy to work in and it is a very quiet case.
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October 12, 2011 5:45:11 PM

Umm, cant be beat? I'll give you the H100 is good - maybe the best in normal consumer stuff - but its not the end all be all. That belongs to thermoelectric, peltier, and phase change coolers. Usually you have to go to a hardcore cooling site for the (crazypc.com etc) but newegg has one hybrid thermoelectric cooler, for about the h100 price.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
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October 13, 2011 12:41:52 AM

inanition02 said:
Umm, cant be beat? I'll give you the H100 is good - maybe the best in normal consumer stuff - but its not the end all be all. That belongs to thermoelectric, peltier, and phase change coolers. Usually you have to go to a hardcore cooling site for the (crazypc.com etc) but newegg has one hybrid thermoelectric cooler, for about the h100 price.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...


Yes I did mean mainstream coolers not something overly expensive or exotic. There are water cooling kits and so forth that IF properly installed are more effective but honestly, the H100 is so effective I am not sure it would be a great upgrade. If properly installed the H100 is more than sufficient to cool the highest overclock and it requires no maintenance.

Thank you for sharing the link to the thermoelectric coolers, I really had not heard about them. I do know that the military has special coolers in their computers for severe weather which are very costly. If I get the time I will check into the thermo coolers - it makes sense to actually install a small electric cooling unit when you have as much heat as what CPUs put out.

Water coolers and air coolers are limited to the ambient temperature. They cannot produce a lower temperature than the surrounding air. An electric cooler would not have that limitation and so it is an intriguing thought.

It is funny, the Newegg reviewers are saying that the Noctua NH-D14 "creams" the Cooler Master Thermo electric cooler listed in Newegg - that is amusing. The D-14 is really good for the money. I am sure that there are more expensive TECs that are much more efficient and cool better than the H100 and D-14.
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October 13, 2011 1:02:30 AM

Cooling:

Don't go crazy with all these suggestions. Here's some basic tips:

1) Have two or three case fans, usually 120mm, that spin at a CONSTANT SPEED, are very quiet and low RPM (500 to 800RPM). You just need something fairly quiet that moves the heat out.

One case fan should be at the bottom-front to suck in cool air. One (or two) fans should be at the top-rear.

2) The CPU heatsink fan is best facing rear or top, depending on how your case fans and PSU are setup. You want the CPU heatsink fan to suck air THROUGH the heatsink and send it TO the case fan which then sucks it out the case.

3) It's not necessary but I'm a fan of having the PSU on the bottom.

4) Do NOT make the mistake so many people make and have hot air being sucked through the PSU. It's okay to have a bottom-mounted PSU have an intake inside the case but TOP-mounted PSU's should have the intake and outtake outside of the case.

Why have the PSU sucking in all that hot air next to the CPU? That means the PSU will get MUCH hotter than needed and also its fan will spin faster and become noisier to get rid of that heat.

5) There's a BALANCE between NOISE and HEAT.
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October 13, 2011 7:31:30 AM

photonboy said:
Cooling:

Don't go crazy with all these suggestions. Here's some basic tips:

1) Have two or three case fans, usually 120mm, that spin at a CONSTANT SPEED, are very quiet and low RPM (500 to 800RPM). You just need something fairly quiet that moves the heat out.

One case fan should be at the bottom-front to suck in cool air. One (or two) fans should be at the top-rear.

2) The CPU heatsink fan is best facing rear or top, depending on how your case fans and PSU are setup. You want the CPU heatsink fan to suck air THROUGH the heatsink and send it TO the case fan which then sucks it out the case.

3) It's not necessary but I'm a fan of having the PSU on the bottom.

4) Do NOT make the mistake so many people make and have hot air being sucked through the PSU. It's okay to have a bottom-mounted PSU have an intake inside the case but TOP-mounted PSU's should have the intake and outtake outside of the case.

Why have the PSU sucking in all that hot air next to the CPU? That means the PSU will get MUCH hotter than needed and also its fan will spin faster and become noisier to get rid of that heat.

5) There's a BALANCE between NOISE and HEAT.


Thanks for the tips.
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October 13, 2011 8:11:44 AM

photonboy said:
Cooling:

Don't go crazy with all these suggestions. Here's some basic tips:

1) Have two or three case fans, usually 120mm, that spin at a CONSTANT SPEED, are very quiet and low RPM (500 to 800RPM). You just need something fairly quiet that moves the heat out.

One case fan should be at the bottom-front to suck in cool air. One (or two) fans should be at the top-rear.

2) The CPU heatsink fan is best facing rear or top, depending on how your case fans and PSU are setup. You want the CPU heatsink fan to suck air THROUGH the heatsink and send it TO the case fan which then sucks it out the case.

3) It's not necessary but I'm a fan of having the PSU on the bottom.

4) Do NOT make the mistake so many people make and have hot air being sucked through the PSU. It's okay to have a bottom-mounted PSU have an intake inside the case but TOP-mounted PSU's should have the intake and outtake outside of the case.

Why have the PSU sucking in all that hot air next to the CPU? That means the PSU will get MUCH hotter than needed and also its fan will spin faster and become noisier to get rid of that heat.

5) There's a BALANCE between NOISE and HEAT.


Not that I disagree, but why are your bringing up top mount vs bottom mount PSUs? Wouldn't that subject be for a more advanced build as it is rare to top mount a PSU and most cases do not have that option?

I do agree that a bottom mount taking in cool air from the bottom and exhausting hot air out the back is optimum.
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October 13, 2011 11:44:14 AM

"but why are your bringing up top mount vs bottom mount PSUs?"

You misunderstand, I'm talking about PSU's mounted in the bottom-rear instead of the more NORMAL way of top-rear but INSIDE THE CASE.

I like the Antec approach of mounting the PSU in the bottom-rear. This way you can keep the PSU away from the CPU and have two case fans (top-rear-rear and top-rear-top) to easily get rid of the CPU and other case heat.

Heat rises and the PSU being at the top (inside) blocks the ability to get rid of that heat a little bit.

(It also avoids the mistake that people make by having a PSU suck in heat from the case, especially near the CPU, and pass it through the PSU. Why people do this so often is beyond me. This doesn't matter with the PSU at the bottom since heat rises.)
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