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digital darkroom room color

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Anonymous
April 9, 2005 7:57:55 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

hello,
i am setting a room dedicated as a digital darkroom.
are there any colors that are recommended to paint the room? i seem to
recall the newpaper that i used to work at, repainted their room a special
shade of gray, in the area they did their desktop publishing.

is it anything i should even worry about?

tia,
paul
Anonymous
April 10, 2005 1:34:12 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Paul Bauer" <paulb@powerweb.net> writes:

> hello,
> i am setting a room dedicated as a digital darkroom.
> are there any colors that are recommended to paint the room? i seem to
> recall the newpaper that i used to work at, repainted their room a special
> shade of gray, in the area they did their desktop publishing.
>
> is it anything i should even worry about?

Well, you probably don't want the walls a really strong, saturated,
color; they'll color everything in the room except the monitor, your
eyes will adapt to it, and the monitor will look funny and/or you'll
make bad color decisions when looking at it.

I'd say that any density of neutral gray was an excellent choice; I've
got light neutral gray walls and a white ceiling, myself.
--
David Dyer-Bennet, <mailto:D d-b@dd-b.net>, <http://www.dd-b.net/dd-b/&gt;
RKBA: <http://noguns-nomoney.com/&gt; <http://www.dd-b.net/carry/&gt;
Pics: <http://dd-b.lighthunters.net/&gt; <http://www.dd-b.net/dd-b/SnapshotAlbum/&gt;
Dragaera/Steven Brust: <http://dragaera.info/&gt;
April 10, 2005 2:07:44 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Paul Bauer" <paulb@powerweb.net> wrote in message
news:7a341$425841cd$45d28713$21739@powerweb.allthenewsgroups.com...
> hello,
> i am setting a room dedicated as a digital darkroom.
> are there any colors that are recommended to paint the room? i seem to
> recall the newpaper that i used to work at, repainted their room a special
> shade of gray, in the area they did their desktop publishing.
>
> is it anything i should even worry about?
I suppose you could paint it gray or black. Mine is not, and I have no
plans to change.
The artists seem to want the room as dark as possible.
Jim
Related resources
April 10, 2005 2:25:09 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"David Dyer-Bennet" <dd-b@dd-b.net> wrote in message
news:m2vf6v2wd7.fsf@gw.dd-b.net...
> "Paul Bauer" <paulb@powerweb.net> writes:

> I'd say that any density of neutral gray was an excellent choice; I've
> got light neutral gray walls and a white ceiling, myself.

I just built my digital darkroom, and chose two shades of gray for the walls
and cabinetry. I leave the room lights off when working with photos.

See it here:
http://home.bellsouth.net/p/s/community.dll?ep=334&file...
Anonymous
April 10, 2005 5:29:47 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Jim" <j.n@nospam.com> wrote in message
news:QmY5e.609$m84.373@newssvr12.news.prodigy.com...
>
> "Paul Bauer" <paulb@powerweb.net> wrote in message
> news:7a341$425841cd$45d28713$21739@powerweb.allthenewsgroups.com...
>> hello,
>> i am setting a room dedicated as a digital darkroom.
>> are there any colors that are recommended to paint the room? i seem to
>> recall the newpaper that i used to work at, repainted their room a
>> special
>> shade of gray, in the area they did their desktop publishing.
>>
>> is it anything i should even worry about?
> I suppose you could paint it gray or black. Mine is not, and I have no
> plans to change.
> The artists seem to want the room as dark as possible.
> Jim
>

What would you recommend to use as a digital safelight?
April 10, 2005 8:09:02 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

The point is that ambient light affects your perception of print color more
than monitor color: the reflectivity of a print is far less than the
apparent brightness of a monitor.
Let a print dry and look at under different light sources, primarily
tungsten, daylight and the usual mixture of the two, before you decide on
whether the color balance is "correct" or not.
Anonymous
April 10, 2005 1:33:50 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

werdan wrote:
[]
> What would you recommend to use as a digital safelight?

A low intensity light that does not shine directly on to the screen. Some
people like desk lights to illuminate paperwork.

David
Anonymous
April 10, 2005 3:27:52 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

birdman wrote:

> The point is that ambient light affects your perception of print color more
> than monitor color: the reflectivity of a print is far less than the
> apparent brightness of a monitor.
> Let a print dry and look at under different light sources, primarily
> tungsten, daylight and the usual mixture of the two, before you decide on
> whether the color balance is "correct" or not.
>
>
At least we don't have to paint the room black, like we did in the film
days :-)
Anonymous
April 10, 2005 3:52:15 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Sun, 10 Apr 2005 01:29:47 GMT, "werdan"
<footrotdog@that.gmail.fad.com> wrote:

>
>"Jim" <j.n@nospam.com> wrote in message
>news:QmY5e.609$m84.373@newssvr12.news.prodigy.com...
>>
>> "Paul Bauer" <paulb@powerweb.net> wrote in message
>> news:7a341$425841cd$45d28713$21739@powerweb.allthenewsgroups.com...
>>> hello,
>>> i am setting a room dedicated as a digital darkroom.
>>> are there any colors that are recommended to paint the room? i seem to
>>> recall the newpaper that i used to work at, repainted their room a
>>> special
>>> shade of gray, in the area they did their desktop publishing.
>>>
>>> is it anything i should even worry about?
>> I suppose you could paint it gray or black. Mine is not, and I have no
>> plans to change.
>> The artists seem to want the room as dark as possible.
>> Jim
>>
>
>What would you recommend to use as a digital safelight?
>
I painted by computer room black, so a co-ordinated safelight should
also be black.
Yes, I think a blacklight is the right answer!. :-)

--
Bill Funk
Change "g" to "a"
April 10, 2005 4:32:43 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Don Stauffer" <stauffer@usfamily.net> wrote in message
news:1113150474.283880a1cf860bb09fd4da6edc3d7acf@teranews...

> At least we don't have to paint the room black, like we did in the film
> days :-)

I never painted mine in dark shades. It was always white, and the safelight
was set to appropriate brightness, which made things a lot easier to see and
find in the lab.

See it here:
http://home.bellsouth.net/p/s/community.dll?ep=334&file...
Anonymous
April 10, 2005 9:41:17 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Don Stauffer <stauffer@usfamily.net> wrote:

> birdman wrote:
>
>> The point is that ambient light affects your perception of print
>> color more than monitor color: the reflectivity of a print is far
>> less than the apparent brightness of a monitor.
>> Let a print dry and look at under different light sources, primarily
>> tungsten, daylight and the usual mixture of the two, before you
>> decide on whether the color balance is "correct" or not.
>>
>>
> At least we don't have to paint the room black, like we did in the
> film days :-)
>

ISO9100 requires you to paint the room gray. Any ambient light must be
5000K (and very dim). The monitor is to be set for D6500 for all except
pre-press work. Pre-press requires a D5000 setup.

Monkeys will fly out of my butt before I set my monitor to D5000.
Anonymous
April 10, 2005 11:00:13 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Sun, 10 Apr 2005 11:27:52 -0500, Don Stauffer
<stauffer@usfamily.net> wrote:

>birdman wrote:
>
>> The point is that ambient light affects your perception of print color more
>> than monitor color: the reflectivity of a print is far less than the
>> apparent brightness of a monitor.
>> Let a print dry and look at under different light sources, primarily
>> tungsten, daylight and the usual mixture of the two, before you decide on
>> whether the color balance is "correct" or not.
>>
>>
>At least we don't have to paint the room black, like we did in the film
>days :-)

But a nice gray is helpful as is Graphite for a Mac when doing color
management.


*******************************************************

"Man came silently into the world."

Pierre Teilhard de Chardin
_The Phenomenon Of Man_
Anonymous
April 10, 2005 11:00:57 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Sun, 10 Apr 2005 12:32:43 -0500, "PhotoMan" <photoman@wfeca.net>
wrote:

>
>"Don Stauffer" <stauffer@usfamily.net> wrote in message
>news:1113150474.283880a1cf860bb09fd4da6edc3d7acf@teranews...
>
>> At least we don't have to paint the room black, like we did in the film
>> days :-)
>
>I never painted mine in dark shades. It was always white, and the safelight
>was set to appropriate brightness, which made things a lot easier to see and
>find in the lab.

Mine to, never saw any point to a black darkroom. It just had to be
dark.


*******************************************************

"Man came silently into the world."

Pierre Teilhard de Chardin
_The Phenomenon Of Man_
April 11, 2005 4:14:07 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

John A. Stovall wrote:


>>
>>> At least we don't have to paint the room black, like we did in the film
>>> days :-)
>>
>>I never painted mine in dark shades. It was always white, and the
>>safelight was set to appropriate brightness, which made things a lot
>>easier to see and find in the lab.
>
> Mine to, never saw any point to a black darkroom. It just had to be
> dark.
>

But aren't black walls darker when you turn the light off? :-)

--

Stacey
Anonymous
April 11, 2005 5:12:05 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Big Bill" <bill@pipping.com> wrote in message
news:0dti51l59i2mtu8cnbepftsg8c0ealjs72@4ax.com...
>>
>>What would you recommend to use as a digital safelight?
>>
> I painted by computer room black, so a co-ordinated safelight should
> also be black.
> Yes, I think a blacklight is the right answer!. :-)
>

lol. Thanks Big Bill. I'm glad someone got the joke :-)
Anonymous
April 11, 2005 11:10:44 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Stacey <fotocord@yahoo.com> wrote:

: But aren't black walls darker when you turn the light off? :-)

(chuckle) Actually, yes they are. If you can see the black color, SOME
amount of light is being reflected, so removing the light source would
actually make the "black wall" reflect less light, and thus blacker. :) 

But the main reason I always went with a mat black wall color was to
reduce the chance of stray reflected light causing trouble. Of course now
that I am using digital, a dark colored room, with a colored light, a
bunch of chemicals and a constantly flowing water tank is much less
desired. :)  That's one of the advantages of going digital that I like. I
can do some fairly advanced "darkroom tricks" right there in my bedroom.
In fact I have done some fairly tricky stuff on a laptop, in a tent, on
a mountain top, a LONG way from the nearest room (not to mention dark
room). :) 

Randy

==========
Randy Berbaum
Champaign, IL
Anonymous
April 11, 2005 2:34:47 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Mon, 11 Apr 2005 00:14:07 -0400, Stacey <fotocord@yahoo.com> wrote:

>John A. Stovall wrote:
>
>
>>>
>>>> At least we don't have to paint the room black, like we did in the film
>>>> days :-)
>>>
>>>I never painted mine in dark shades. It was always white, and the
>>>safelight was set to appropriate brightness, which made things a lot
>>>easier to see and find in the lab.
>>
>> Mine to, never saw any point to a black darkroom. It just had to be
>> dark.
>>
>
> But aren't black walls darker when you turn the light off? :-)

During the day, yes.
But I akways did my darkroom work at night.
Man, after dark, my darkroom was AWESOME!

--
Bill Funk
Change "g" to "a"
Anonymous
April 11, 2005 2:36:14 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Sun, 10 Apr 2005 19:00:13 GMT, John A. Stovall
<johnastovall@earthlink.net> wrote:

>On Sun, 10 Apr 2005 11:27:52 -0500, Don Stauffer
><stauffer@usfamily.net> wrote:
>
>>birdman wrote:
>>
>>> The point is that ambient light affects your perception of print color more
>>> than monitor color: the reflectivity of a print is far less than the
>>> apparent brightness of a monitor.
>>> Let a print dry and look at under different light sources, primarily
>>> tungsten, daylight and the usual mixture of the two, before you decide on
>>> whether the color balance is "correct" or not.
>>>
>>>
>>At least we don't have to paint the room black, like we did in the film
>>days :-)
>
>But a nice gray is helpful as is Graphite for a Mac when doing color
>management.

Does the graphite just sit in a jar, or does it need to be sprinkled
over the keyboard?

--
Bill Funk
Change "g" to "a"
Anonymous
April 11, 2005 3:12:35 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

> ISO9100 requires you to paint the room gray. Any ambient light must be
> 5000K (and very dim). The monitor is to be set for D6500 for all except
> pre-press work. Pre-press requires a D5000 setup.
>
> Monkeys will fly out of my butt before I set my monitor to D5000.

any idea where i could read or download the iso requirements?

thanks,
paul
Anonymous
April 11, 2005 10:44:54 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Mon, 11 Apr 2005 10:36:14 -0700, Big Bill <bill@pipping.com> wrote:

>On Sun, 10 Apr 2005 19:00:13 GMT, John A. Stovall
><johnastovall@earthlink.net> wrote:
>
>>On Sun, 10 Apr 2005 11:27:52 -0500, Don Stauffer
>><stauffer@usfamily.net> wrote:
>>
>>>birdman wrote:
>>>
>>>> The point is that ambient light affects your perception of print color more
>>>> than monitor color: the reflectivity of a print is far less than the
>>>> apparent brightness of a monitor.
>>>> Let a print dry and look at under different light sources, primarily
>>>> tungsten, daylight and the usual mixture of the two, before you decide on
>>>> whether the color balance is "correct" or not.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>At least we don't have to paint the room black, like we did in the film
>>>days :-)
>>
>>But a nice gray is helpful as is Graphite for a Mac when doing color
>>management.
>
>Does the graphite just sit in a jar, or does it need to be sprinkled
>over the keyboard?

No, it's a system pref which makes things a nice neutral gray.

It remove the gum drop colors of the window buttons.


************************************************************

"'Simplify, simplify.'....I wanted to simplify. No wants,
no needs, no hungers. Only rifles....I was at my best with
a rifle in my hand. I always loved rifles. So I decided to
live in such a way that the rifle would be all I needed.
And I succeeded."

Bob the Nailer
_Point of Impact_
by
Stephen Hunter
Anonymous
April 11, 2005 11:01:32 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Mon, 11 Apr 2005 11:12:35 -0500, "Paul Bauer" <paulb@powerweb.net>
wrote:

>
>> ISO9100 requires you to paint the room gray. Any ambient light must be
>> 5000K (and very dim). The monitor is to be set for D6500 for all except
>> pre-press work. Pre-press requires a D5000 setup.
>>
>> Monkeys will fly out of my butt before I set my monitor to D5000.
>
>any idea where i could read or download the iso requirements?
>
>thanks,
>paul
>
If *I* were going to ask a question, it would have been, how did those
monkeys get *in* there?

--
Bill Funk
Change "g" to "a"
Anonymous
April 11, 2005 11:02:20 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Mon, 11 Apr 2005 18:44:54 GMT, John A. Stovall
<johnastovall@earthlink.net> wrote:

>On Mon, 11 Apr 2005 10:36:14 -0700, Big Bill <bill@pipping.com> wrote:
>
>>On Sun, 10 Apr 2005 19:00:13 GMT, John A. Stovall
>><johnastovall@earthlink.net> wrote:
>>
>>>On Sun, 10 Apr 2005 11:27:52 -0500, Don Stauffer
>>><stauffer@usfamily.net> wrote:
>>>
>>>>birdman wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> The point is that ambient light affects your perception of print color more
>>>>> than monitor color: the reflectivity of a print is far less than the
>>>>> apparent brightness of a monitor.
>>>>> Let a print dry and look at under different light sources, primarily
>>>>> tungsten, daylight and the usual mixture of the two, before you decide on
>>>>> whether the color balance is "correct" or not.
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>At least we don't have to paint the room black, like we did in the film
>>>>days :-)
>>>
>>>But a nice gray is helpful as is Graphite for a Mac when doing color
>>>management.
>>
>>Does the graphite just sit in a jar, or does it need to be sprinkled
>>over the keyboard?
>
>No, it's a system pref which makes things a nice neutral gray.
>
>It remove the gum drop colors of the window buttons.

Ah! OK, thanks!

--
Bill Funk
Change "g" to "a"
Anonymous
April 12, 2005 4:13:34 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Paul Bauer" <paulb@powerweb.net> wrote:

> any idea where i could read or download the iso requirements?
>
> thanks,
> paul

I Googled them up the first time I read them but I've lost the URL. They
were ISO 9000 requirements with some notes about expected changes in ISO
9100.
Anonymous
April 12, 2005 6:27:58 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

John A. Stovall <johnastovall@earthlink.net> writes:

>Mine to, never saw any point to a black darkroom. It just had to be
>dark.

It is useful if you have an enlarger that leaks light out of the
lamphouse and negative stage area. Black walls around the enlarger help
ensure the leaking light doesn't make it to the paper.

Of course, you could also get a better enlarger.

Dave
Anonymous
April 12, 2005 7:19:03 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Big Bill <bill@pipping.com> wrote:


> If *I* were going to ask a question, it would have been, how did those
> monkeys get *in* there?
>

Too much chimping?
Anonymous
April 12, 2005 4:03:50 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Mon, 11 Apr 2005 19:01:32 -0700, in rec.photo.digital , Big Bill
<bill@pipping.com> in <ouam51dmao5a47sda0j21q8l7kfor9bf2p@4ax.com>
wrote:

>On Mon, 11 Apr 2005 11:12:35 -0500, "Paul Bauer" <paulb@powerweb.net>
>wrote:
>
>>
>>> ISO9100 requires you to paint the room gray. Any ambient light must be
>>> 5000K (and very dim). The monitor is to be set for D6500 for all except
>>> pre-press work. Pre-press requires a D5000 setup.
>>>
>>> Monkeys will fly out of my butt before I set my monitor to D5000.
>>
>>any idea where i could read or download the iso requirements?
>>
>>thanks,
>>paul
>>
>If *I* were going to ask a question, it would have been, how did those
>monkeys get *in* there?

There are times when you don't much care about the cause, you just
want a solution. If I had monkeys in my butt and all it took to get
them out of there was to set my monitor to D5000 I would set every
monitor on the island to D5000.


--
Matt Silberstein

All in all, if I could be any animal, I would want to be
a duck or a goose. They can fly, walk, and swim. Plus,
there there is a certain satisfaction knowing that at the
end of your life you will taste good with an orange sauce
or, in the case of a goose, a chestnut stuffing.
!