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Is a GTX 570 right for me?

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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August 11, 2011 11:53:10 PM

Hi all,

I'm hoping I can get some opinions and basically have someone tell me if my thinking is clear. I recently built a computer from the ground up, with the exception of a video card. Right now I'm still using my 9800 GTX+.

First, my new rig is as follows:

CPU: Core i5-2500k
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z68X-UD3-B3
PSU: CORSAIR CMPSU-750TX 750W
Memory: 8gb of DDR3 1600
Resolution that I play games at: 1920x1200
Overclocking: I have no interest in overclocking a GPU

I think I have decided on getting a GTX 570. I have come to this conclusion for the following reasons:

1) I like Nvidia for the driver support.
2) I know it only got an "honorable mention" in the July "Best Graphics Cards For The Money" article, but I want to go with a single card rather than SLI/Crossfire. My thinking here is that I'd rather get a decent single card so that later, when this one starts moving toward the lower end of graphics cards, I can get a second one and extend the life of this card.
3) The price is reasonable. Obviously this is hugely subjective, but of the Nvidia cards, I feel this is about the most money I want to spend on a card.
4) I'll be using this to play Battlefield 3. I had been waiting for the official system requirements to be released, but I figure that (a) if the 570 is overkill for BF3, then at least I have some future-proofing and (b) if it's not powerful enough to handle BF3 at the settings I want, then oh well, I wasn't going to spend more money on a graphics card anyways.

So does the above logic make sense? Does it make sense to just get one "good" card now rather than the 2x 6850s (not to say that they're not good cards, but apparently they are not as good as the 570) that the "Best Graphics Card For The Money" article recommends, so that I can get another one later for SLI?

And finally, if the above logic does make sense, I have three questions:

1) Are there any recommendations for manufacturers?
2) Looking at Newegg, I often see three or four different 570s at different prices from the same manufacturer. From what I can tell, some of them are overclocked. I have no interest in overclocking a GPU card myself, so is it a good idea to get one that is overclocked from the factory?
3) Can my PSU even handle two 570s in SLI?

Thank you in advance!

More about : gtx 570

a c 214 U Graphics card
August 12, 2011 12:16:49 AM

I have played in the BF3 Alpha and although I was able to max it out with a 6870 all of the settings were turned way down since it was an Alpha.From that I assume that a single GTX570 is not overkill and you might even need 2 of them to max everything out and stay above 60FPS @ 1080p.

The GTX570's get hot so I would reccomend getting a card form MSI or Asus because they have some of the best Aftermarket heatisnks on their cards which will yield much cooler temps than others.

Totaly System Power Draw for a GTX570 SLI is less than 600watts so your PSU should be able to power it.

What is your budget for the GTX570?
a b U Graphics card
August 12, 2011 12:19:04 AM

The GTX570 is a very solid card, especially since now that it's prices have fallen to $290-ish at Newegg, offering better than 6970 levels of performance in most games at 1080p, and at $20-$30 less cost than the 6970...

I would think that a name brand 750 watt SLI-approved PSU would handle SLI duties in the future.....
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a b U Graphics card
August 12, 2011 12:19:43 AM

The 570 sounds like the right choice for you. If you're never going to overclock then a factory overclock might be worth a few extra bucks, not sure why you would be opposed to overclocking though, it's as easy as turning the volume up in media player, you just move a slider over. That PSU should be fine for two of them. I don't have a brand preference but EVGA has a good reputation and the Gigabyte cards seem to have the best cooling, but if you never overclock the cooler is of less importance.
a b U Graphics card
August 12, 2011 12:22:16 AM

i would absolutely get the gtx 570 over any radeon card right now, in overclock3d, a very good site for reviews, they recommend it over the hd 6970. it will last you a long time, and if you overclock it you can get it to almost the performance of a stock gtx 580
August 12, 2011 12:30:39 AM

Thanks for the replies! Glad to hear the 570 is a good choice.

Quote:
What is your budget for the GTX570?
I'm trying to stay around $330 (after rebate) max.
Quote:
not sure why you would be opposed to overclocking though, it's as easy as turning the volume up in media player, you just move a slider over.
Well, to be completely honest, I didn't know it was that easy. I kind of just wanted to avoid overclocking because I don't have to think about getting aftermarket coolers or voiding my warranty or whatever else overclocking might imply. If it really is just that easy, though, I may just consider it.

Is it a better idea to get a stock card and then overclock it myself, or just buy a factory-overclocked card? I'm not really sure I understand why there even is a difference if both are overclocked to the same speed.
a c 214 U Graphics card
August 12, 2011 12:49:01 AM

Well your O.C.ing results are always dependent of the heatsink as heat is always a restricting factor as well as the limitations of the card.

Here is a great card.

Asus GTX570 $350=$320 after MIR + $8 Shipping

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

That Asus GTX570 has really good cooling and mild O.C. but it takes up 3 slots instead of the traditonal 2.This is a problem for some mobo's but yours can support it.
I would have suggested the MSI Twin Frozr II but newegg doesn't seem to have it on special right now.Although i'm sure in the future the price will drop.


a b U Graphics card
August 12, 2011 1:03:59 AM

yhelothur said:
Thanks for the replies! Glad to hear the 570 is a good choice.

I kind of just wanted to avoid overclocking because I don't have to think about getting aftermarket coolers or voiding my warranty or whatever else overclocking might imply. If it really is just that easy, though, I may just consider it.


These days I think manufacturers expect you to overclock, most include overclocking software with the cards, so an aftermarket cooler is not neccesary, and it most cases it won't void your warranty, there is no way for them to know anyways because it's done with software and there is no alteration to the card physically or electrically.

In some cases the overclocked cards have chips that were binned more rigorously and are capable of being stable at higher clock speeds than the not factory overclocked cards, in some cases there not and it's just a different bios, but in most cases even the worst cards are capable of the minor increases that factory overclocked cards offer.


August 12, 2011 1:11:55 AM

purple stank said:
Well your O.C.ing results are always dependent of the heatsink as heat is always a restricting factor as well as the limitations of the card.

Here is a great card.

Asus GTX570 $350=$320 after MIR + $8 Shipping

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

That Asus GTX570 has really good cooling and mild O.C. but it takes up 3 slots instead of the traditonal 2.This is a problem for some mobo's but yours can support it.
I would have suggested the MSI Twin Frozr II but newegg doesn't seem to have it on special right now.Although i'm sure in the future the price will drop.
Wow, that thing is huge. When you say that taking up three slots is not a problem for my motherboard, I take it you mean that I can still fit in a second card if I want to? I just opened up my case to look at the space, and it looks like the fans of that thing would be right up against the bottom of a second card.



benski said:
These days I think manufacturers expect you to overclock, most include overclocking software with the cards, so an aftermarket cooler is not neccesary, and it most cases it won't void your warranty, there is no way for them to know anyways because it's done with software and there is no alteration to the card physically or electrically.

In some cases the overclocked cards have chips that were binned more rigorously and are capable of being stable at higher clock speeds than the not factory overclocked cards, in some cases there not and it's just a different bios, but in most cases even the worst cards are capable of the minor increases that factory overclocked cards offer.
This is good to know. Is this overclocking software something that runs in Windows, or would I need to reboot to play around with it?
a c 214 U Graphics card
August 12, 2011 1:25:12 AM

MSI Afterburner is a software O.C.ing tool.You can download for free or if you buy an MSI card it usually comes with it.Asus also offers an O.C.ing software tool but i'm not familar with it.

Yah thats the only problem with that huge Asus card is it takes up a lot of room.Most tradional mobo's don't have such a gap between them as your mobo does which means they are almost touching in SLI/Crossfire anyway.It's very common for their not to be any space between them.Although this does decrease airflow and increase temps anywhere from 5c to 10c.

As I said before the MSI Twin Frozr II offers the same if not cooler temps than the Asus card without taking up that extra slot.

Here's some temps with the Asus card vs the stock cards.It's about a 20c difference with an aftermarket heatsink.

http://www.pureoverclock.com/review.php?id=1269&page=17
a b U Graphics card
August 12, 2011 1:38:10 AM

Also an MSI afterburner user, and yes it's windows software and no it doesn't require any reboots.
August 12, 2011 1:38:29 AM

Well, unless someone posts something to change my mind in the next few hours, I plan to order the Asus card tonight.

Thank you very much for your help!
a c 214 U Graphics card
August 12, 2011 2:57:12 AM

After some more seraching I finally found some temperature benchmarks.It seems that their is another card better than the Asus GTX570 which is the Gigabyte SOC GTX570.

Gigabyte SOC GTX570= 67c

http://www.vortez.net/articles_pages/gigabyte_gtx570_12...

Asus GTX570= 81c

http://www.pureoverclock.com/review.php?id=1269&page=17

I wold have thought the Asus GTX570 to be very cool but I guess the Gigabyte card can deleiver better results probably due to the 3 fan design.I would reccomend then going with the Gigabyte card for the cooler temps and it takes up less space.

It's even a little cheaper too.Again it has a minor O.C. but about 40mhz faster than the Asus card.

Gigabyte SOC GTX570 $345=$315 after MIR + $8 Shipping

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
!