stairs
Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Solved

Is the Maximus V Gene too much for a NON-gamer

Tags:
  • Asus
  • Adobe Premiere
  • Motherboards
Last response: in Motherboards
Share
November 15, 2012 1:41:40 PM

I am building a custom PC to run Adobe Premiere Pro CS6. I using a Asus maximus gene V motherboard and Intel i7-3770k. I am between GTX 650 and GTX 650ti. I am on tight budget and was wondering if I could save some money by getting a cheaper ASUS motherboard. I do NOT game at all on PC.

More about : maximus gene gamer

Best solution

a c 207 Ĉ ASUS
a c 717 V Motherboard
November 15, 2012 2:46:06 PM

For a 'micro-ATX' the ASUS Maximus V Gene is about the best you can buy. That said, I'm personally not an mATX fan unless I'm building a special purposed PC e.g. HTPC, LAN PC, etc. The problem is that mATX has to both cram into a small space (edit/added heat) all of its PCB components and/or leave them off e.g. VRM.

Therefore, for about the same amount of money I'd consider either the ASUS P8Z77-V or ASUS P8Z77-V Pro.
Share
a b Ĉ ASUS
a c 93 V Motherboard
November 15, 2012 2:51:51 PM

Get a decent ATX board for ~$150. ASUS, Gigabyte, Asrock... all have decent boards in that range.
m
0
l
Related resources
a b Ĉ ASUS
a c 96 V Motherboard
November 15, 2012 5:18:17 PM

jaquith said:
The problem is that mATX has to both cram into a small space (edit/added heat) all of its PCB components and/or leave them off e.g. VRM.

Most mATX motherboards have almost exactly the same layout and components as their ATX counterpart except for three fewer expansion slots, some connectors getting shuffled around a little and smaller heatsinks to accommodate the reduced free space. ATX boards waste a lot more space around the extra slots and that allows motherboard manufacturers to use the otherwise wasted space to make the layout look prettier/cleaner. Since there aren't any more ICs on the mATX board than the ATX and they are surrounded by IO slots in either case, there isn't much of a difference in how hot any of those areas will get aside from that attributable to smaller (or omitted) heatsinks.

ITX boards on the other hand do require a complete redesign with all the ICs usually interleaved with IO slots packed around the CPU and for those, I agree things may get notably hotter.
m
0
l
a b Ĉ ASUS
a c 93 V Motherboard
November 15, 2012 5:37:44 PM

InvalidError said:
Most mATX motherboards have almost exactly the same layout and components as their ATX counterpart except for three fewer expansion slots, some connectors getting shuffled around a little and smaller heatsinks to accommodate the reduced free space.

Actually, a lot of mATX boards have less power phases than their apparently equivalent ATX counterparts. For example, the Asrock Z77 Extreme4 has an 8 + 4 power phase design, while the Asrock Z77 Extreme4-M has a 4 + 2 power phase design.
m
0
l
a b Ĉ ASUS
a c 96 V Motherboard
November 15, 2012 8:18:53 PM

More phases is not necessarily better. 8+4 implementations typically use smaller and cheaper MOSFETs than 4+2 to shave cost since the higher current per device (lower RDSon) is not necessary. Regulators with more phases will usually run somewhat cooler but are usually less efficient due to higher driver and switching losses. For stability and reliability, it can go either way depending on the specific design.

Motherboard manufacturers boasting about who has the most phases is mostly a marketing thing.
m
0
l
a c 207 Ĉ ASUS
a c 717 V Motherboard
November 15, 2012 11:05:54 PM

InvalidError said:
More phases is not necessarily better. 8+4 implementations typically use smaller and cheaper MOSFETs than 4+2 to shave cost since the higher current per device (lower RDSon) is not necessary. Regulators with more phases will usually run somewhat cooler but are usually less efficient due to higher driver and switching losses. For stability and reliability, it can go either way depending on the specific design.

Motherboard manufacturers boasting about who has the most phases is mostly a marketing thing.

Entirely depends on the MOBO, for example one of my complaints with Thomas (Crashman) in his articles is that he's apparently use to Gigabyte or similar MOBO's that have poor to very poor Phase implementation -- he always maxes-out the Phase control in the BIOS for underwhelming OC's.

In contrast, the ASUS Phase control is very good and there's rarely a need other than extreme overclocking to use more than medium to high. So CPU's, for Sandy Bridge my preference is 12+4(iGPU)+2 and Ivy Bridge close to the same or 10+4+2. There's a good reason folks who know how to OC often choose the ASUS. My stable OC (SB-E 4.8GHz @ 1.36) is impossible on anything other than an ASUS - http://valid.canardpc.com/show_oc.php?id=2320509 Same holds true on the LGA 1155.

Simply, on an mATX there's just not enough room on a 'good' MOBO with 'exceptional' capabilities.

And I really don't want to argue about something that I know all too well. I've argued this same issue at least a 100 times.
m
0
l
a b Ĉ ASUS
a c 96 V Motherboard
November 16, 2012 12:00:47 AM

jaquith said:
Simply, on an mATX there's just not enough room on a 'good' MOBO with 'exceptional' capabilities.

If you compare ASUS' ATX boards with their mATX counterparts, you can see that the layout from the PCIe x16 slot to the top of the board and from the DIMM slots to the rear IO connectors is almost exactly the same except for everything being offset about one expansion slot height up with some connector shuffling to accommodate that. The top of the board ends up slightly more cramped but there still is plenty of space left to keep the whole ATX VRM on the mATX versions if ASUS wanted to so lack of space is not the reason why they drop some phases when going mATX.
m
0
l
November 22, 2012 3:47:34 PM

Great deal right now on a P8Z77-V Le , you think that Is a good choice?
m
0
l
November 22, 2012 3:48:09 PM

Best answer selected by Jguad.
m
0
l
!