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What PSU and case do i need?

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January 17, 2012 3:52:08 PM

Hello everyone, I am going to build my own computer but i don't know what PSU and case that i would need to be able to accommodate for all of the parts. My requirements are below:

GTX 560 TI Twin Frozr 2 in SLi (2 cards)
Intel i7 2600k @ 3.4 GHz
preffered cpu cooler: either a Noctua NH-D14 or a Corsair Hydro series liquid cooling system.
16 GB of ram
ASUS P8 P67 Deluxe motherboard.
22x optical drive
500 GB seagate hard drive and a 1TB Western Digital Green drive
perhaps a sound card in the future

So what PSU and case would i need for this?

Your help is much appreciated :) 

More about : psu case

a b ) Power supply
January 17, 2012 8:02:56 PM

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Here's a selection of cases. If you can, order the ocz power supply special today (ends 1/18). You get a decent modular power supply with dvd burner and $15 gift card for $50 after rebate. I use ocz ps and they are reliable and quiet.
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a c 148 ) Power supply
January 17, 2012 10:57:44 PM

To answer your questions:

a) A 700w psu with 42a on the 12v rails.
My short list of quality PSU's would include Samsung, Antec, XFX, PC P&C, and Corsair.


b) Cases are a personal thing, but for cooling, I would want a case with two 120mm intake fans or equivalent.
Alternatively, two exhaust fans of 120mm or better will suffice.

But, I do have some suggestions for your gaming build:

1) If you have a budget, a 2600K is not a good deal for a gamer. The extra $100 buys you hyperthreading and some cache. Since most games do not use more than two or three threads, the hyperthreads are largely useless. The value of the extra 2mb of cache is unknown.
Both the 2500K and 2600K can overclock to about the same sane limits. You will do better adding that $100 to your graphics budget.

2) No current game uses more than 2 or 3gb of ram. Only if you are a heavy concurrent multitasker would >8gb be needed. Considering the low cost of ram though, I can't argue too much against 16gb.

3) The noctua is a fine cooler, but perhaps more expensive than you need. A $30 cooler like the Xigmatek gaia or cm hyper212 would do just about as well.

4) Sound cards do not help performance. Try the onboard HD sound first.

5) For a boot drive, get a SSD. 80gb would be good, and, considering the current high prices of hard drives, it may not cost you too much more, and the performance is waay better. 80gb will hold the os and half a dozen games. Defer the overflow drive until you run out of room and hard prices come down to earth.
Look for intel, samsung, and crucial, in that order.

6) Lastly...

You are starting out with a sli configuration, but is this really a good idea?
For what it is worth, here are my thoughts on
Dual graphics cards vs. a good single card.

1) How good do you really need to be?
A single GTX560 or 6870 can give you great performance at 1920 x 1200 in most games.

A single GTX560ti or 6950 will give you excellent performance at 1920 x 1200 in most games.
Even 2560 x 1600 will be good with lowered detail.
A single 7970 is about as good as it gets.

Only if you are looking at triple monitor gaming, then sli/cf will be needed.

2) The costs for a single card are lower.
You require a less expensive motherboard; no need for sli/cf or multiple pci-e slots.
Even a ITX motherboard will do.

Your psu costs are less.
A GTX560ti needs a 450w psu, even a GTX580 only needs a 600w psu.
When you add another card to the mix, plan on adding 150-200w to your psu requirements.

Case cooling becomes more of an issue with dual cards.
That means a more expensive case with more and stronger fans.
You will also look at more noise.

3) Dual cards do not always render their half of the display in sync, causing microstuttering. It is an annoying effect.
The benefit of higher benchmark fps can be offset, particularly with lower tier cards.
Read this: http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/radeon-geforce-stut...

4) dual card support is dependent on the driver. Not all games can benefit from dual cards.


5) cf/sli up front reduces your option to get another card for an upgrade. Not that I suggest you plan for that.
It will often be the case that replacing your current card with a newer gen card will offer a better upgrade path.
a c 275 ) Power supply
January 18, 2012 3:19:51 AM

^+1 sound advice!
To answer your question i think you'll need to spend $80+ for a decent case.
You'll need a quality 650W+ psu.
a b ) Power supply
January 18, 2012 8:30:50 AM

geofelt said:
To answer your questions:

a) A 700w psu with 42a on the 12v rails.
My short list of quality PSU's would include Samsung, Antec, XFX, PC P&C, and Corsair.


b) Cases are a personal thing, but for cooling, I would want a case with two 120mm intake fans or equivalent.
Alternatively, two exhaust fans of 120mm or better will suffice.

But, I do have some suggestions for your gaming build:

1) If you have a budget, a 2600K is not a good deal for a gamer. The extra $100 buys you hyperthreading and some cache. Since most games do not use more than two or three threads, the hyperthreads are largely useless. The value of the extra 2mb of cache is unknown.
Both the 2500K and 2600K can overclock to about the same sane limits. You will do better adding that $100 to your graphics budget.

2) No current game uses more than 2 or 3gb of ram. Only if you are a heavy concurrent multitasker would >8gb be needed. Considering the low cost of ram though, I can't argue too much against 16gb.

3) The noctua is a fine cooler, but perhaps more expensive than you need. A $30 cooler like the Xigmatek gaia or cm hyper212 would do just about as well.

4) Sound cards do not help performance. Try the onboard HD sound first.

5) For a boot drive, get a SSD. 80gb would be good, and, considering the current high prices of hard drives, it may not cost you too much more, and the performance is waay better. 80gb will hold the os and half a dozen games. Defer the overflow drive until you run out of room and hard prices come down to earth.
Look for intel, samsung, and crucial, in that order.

6) Lastly...

You are starting out with a sli configuration, but is this really a good idea?
For what it is worth, here are my thoughts on
Dual graphics cards vs. a good single card.

1) How good do you really need to be?
A single GTX560 or 6870 can give you great performance at 1920 x 1200 in most games.

A single GTX560ti or 6950 will give you excellent performance at 1920 x 1200 in most games.
Even 2560 x 1600 will be good with lowered detail.
A single 7970 is about as good as it gets.

Only if you are looking at triple monitor gaming, then sli/cf will be needed.

2) The costs for a single card are lower.
You require a less expensive motherboard; no need for sli/cf or multiple pci-e slots.
Even a ITX motherboard will do.

Your psu costs are less.
A GTX560ti needs a 450w psu, even a GTX580 only needs a 600w psu.
When you add another card to the mix, plan on adding 150-200w to your psu requirements.

Case cooling becomes more of an issue with dual cards.
That means a more expensive case with more and stronger fans.
You will also look at more noise.

3) Dual cards do not always render their half of the display in sync, causing microstuttering. It is an annoying effect.
The benefit of higher benchmark fps can be offset, particularly with lower tier cards.
Read this: http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/radeon-geforce-stut...

4) dual card support is dependent on the driver. Not all games can benefit from dual cards.


5) cf/sli up front reduces your option to get another card for an upgrade. Not that I suggest you plan for that.
It will often be the case that replacing your current card with a newer gen card will offer a better upgrade path.


:wahoo: 
That was very Informative!
January 18, 2012 1:10:38 PM

Sorry, A few things that i forgot to mention:

1. i plan on overclocking the CPU to 4 GHz or maybe 4.4 ghz if i can be convinced it's safe. Wouldn't want to ruin my brand new hardware.

2. would i need a nocuta nh-d14 for that sort of overclock or could i get a cheaper one?

3. i wanted the 560ti in sli because two of them combined get more performance than a single gtx 580 whiles still in the 500$ price range.

4. would the extra performance gain be a worthy trade of for having to get a better psu motherboard e.t.c?

5. i'm getting 16 gb of ram because it's ridiculously cheap now a days.

6. would a gaming motherboard provide a noticeable performance boost as compared to an ASUS P8 P67 Deluxe?

7.will a gaming network card noticeably decrease my ping?

thanks in advance :) 
a c 148 ) Power supply
January 18, 2012 2:03:48 PM

ErikTheAndroid said:
Sorry, A few things that i forgot to mention:

1. i plan on overclocking the CPU to 4 GHz or maybe 4.4 ghz if i can be convinced it's safe. Wouldn't want to ruin my brand new hardware.

2. would i need a nocuta nh-d14 for that sort of overclock or could i get a cheaper one?

3. i wanted the 560ti in sli because two of them combined get more performance than a single gtx 580 whiles still in the 500$ price range.

4. would the extra performance gain be a worthy trade of for having to get a better psu motherboard e.t.c?

5. i'm getting 16 gb of ram because it's ridiculously cheap now a days.

6. would a gaming motherboard provide a noticeable performance boost as compared to an ASUS P8 P67 Deluxe?

7.will a gaming network card noticeably decrease my ping?

thanks in advance :) 


1. While the maximum overclock is determined by the quality of the chip sample, every 2500K I have heard of does 4.0, and most can do 4.5.
If a chip gets dangerously hot, it will downclock itself to protect from damage.

2. No. The DH-14 is a very nice cooler with some of the best and quietest fans. But for a oc of 4.0-4.4, the $30 coolers will do just about as well.

3. Benchmarks will show higher frame rates with sli, GTX560ti, but sli has it's issues, such as more inconsistent performance.
At a budget of $500, I would try to find a 7970 or GTX580 and go with a single card solution. The savings you get on a lesser power supply, and m-atx motherboard will pay for the difference.

4. There is no substitute for a quality psu. It will give you no better performance, but it will last longer, be more stable, be quieter, and be more efficient.
I see little value in "enthusiast" motherboards. They are of value to those with unlimited budget seeking record level overclocks. If it has za Z68 chipset, usb3.0, and 6gb sata, it is probably all you need. They all OC well.

5. No performance downside to 16gb of ram.

6. I don't know what a "gaming" motherboard is. Possibly one with 3/4 pci-e slots. If you are a professional gamer, interested in sli GTX580 or better, go for it.
If you will be using a single monitor, then I suggest a M-ATX motherboard like this ASUS P8Z68-M Pro for $120:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Put it in a great silverstone TJ-08E M-atx case and you will get a small, quiet gaming pc with great cooling. Good for lan party transportation too:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

7. I don't know about ping. I suspect not, but do your research there.
!