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CPU dillema

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January 18, 2012 6:16:41 PM

Hello everyone!

For my current setup I decided to buy a i7 2700k, I posted my setup on a couple of forums to get advice, but in some replies the terms ''Ivy bridge'' came forth, so I started reading about the Ivy bridge thing and it made me doubt if I should buy the 2700k or just wait for a couple of months. Some things I dont understand like the integrated graphics, will they boost your graphic card? Or are these useless when you have a graphic card?

When looking at the GHZ and cores of the Ivy bridge, I noticed these aren't any different from the current Sandy bridge pcu's,

so is it worth the wait?

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January 18, 2012 6:23:56 PM

What will you mainly use the rig for?
The 2700K is rather pointless in terms of performance compared to a 2600K.
January 18, 2012 6:26:04 PM

Photo and film editing and gaming,
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a c 160 U Graphics card
January 18, 2012 6:28:45 PM

Yes in most situations the onboard graphics is useless when using onboard graphics.

The discussion on waiting or not. Follow link :

http://www.tomshardware.co.uk/forum/forum2.php?config=t...

I still believe its worth waiting abit longer. To add to previous discussion. Despite clock speeds being similar the ACTUAL performance increase will be substantial if rumour is to be believed. But mostly its worth waiting for native PCI-e 3 and USB 3 support.

Also will drive PCI-e 3 motherboard prices down quite a bit.
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January 18, 2012 6:30:17 PM

Let me answer what of these questions that I can.

-Will the improved performance of the IGP (Integrated Graphics on Processor) help the performance of a dedicated video card? Yes and no. If the motherboard that you mount this on comes with the Lugiclogix Virtu Software the software can switch between the video card and the IGP for best performance. Since the Intel® Quick Sync can give better performance at some digital encoding work this can improve system performance. Oh the other hand if you are in game and getting 60fps with a dedicated video card you wont see any improvement per say like that.

With our next generation of Intel Core® processors at 22nm you most likely will see only a small performance increase at the same clock speed if you are not using the IGP.

Christian Wood
Intel Enthusiast Team
January 18, 2012 6:34:51 PM

I had chosen an ASRock Z68 Extreme3 Gen3 mobo, it has pci-e 3 on it, but with an 2700k I wouldnt have the advantage from it? Same with the DDR3 memory, it says it supports up to 1333mhz ddr3 memory, does it mean that when I buy DDR3 1600mhz it wouldnt work?

Sorry for the many questions, I am still learning the computer thingy :) 

I will read that topic
a c 120 à CPUs
a b U Graphics card
January 18, 2012 6:39:55 PM

tagnator said:
Photo and film editing and gaming,

The 2600K is a far better value if you decided to build on the SB platform.
1333 is native JDEC supported ram,1600MHz ram will work just fine.
a c 208 à CPUs
a c 160 U Graphics card
January 18, 2012 6:46:01 PM

tagnator said:
I had chosen an ASRock Z68 Extreme3 Gen3 mobo, it has pci-e 3 on it, but with an 2700k I wouldnt have the advantage from it? Same with the DDR3 memory, it says it supports up to 1333mhz ddr3 memory, does it mean that when I buy DDR3 1600mhz it wouldnt work?

Sorry for the many questions, I am still learning the computer thingy :) 

I will read that topic


Yes there are many PCI-e 3 boards out there but NATIVE supprt is ALWAYS better for performance and stability. We are not even sure if this works properly and on what board as it has not been tested due to a lack in PCI-e 3 devices. AMD radeon HD7970 being the first.

In most cases the RAM will underclock to the supported speed on the mobo.
According to Asrock the board supports up to 2133MHz and the CPU 1333MHz. But testers have found getting 1600MHz RAM is the "sweetspot" for Sandy-bridge systems. Giving the best performance even though technically the CPUs do not supprt it.

The next gen Ivy-bridge will support 1600MHz, so I assume 1866 will be the sweet spot there if RAM pricing keeps to the current trend.

The 2600K is also a much better choice as everyone above stated.
January 18, 2012 6:49:51 PM

Hmm I think I will just grab all my patience togheter and wait for the Ivy bridge
a c 208 à CPUs
a c 160 U Graphics card
January 18, 2012 6:58:16 PM

Good decision, me thinks.
!