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Testing Post - New Guide

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November 13, 2009 1:13:28 PM

I'm working on a guide offline and I want to see how the post look before posting final project in the Homebuilt section...

Step-by-Step Guide to Building a PC

This thread is to provide a step-by-step guide to how to build a PC. These are the general steps required in building a PC, which can be performed what sequence you feel best fits your needs.

  • Step One: Choosing your components:
  • Step Two: Prepare your case:
  • Step Three: Install components on motherboard (outside of case):
  • Step Four: Install Motherboard into case:
  • Step Five: Connect System Wires:
  • Step Six: Install Video Card(s):
  • Step Seven: Connect Power Supply:
  • Step Eight: Boot System for First Time:
  • Step Nine: Install Operating System / Drivers:
  • Step Ten: Test System and Have FUN!!


    Step One: Choosing your components:
    Here are the components I have selected for this build: (First build since I decided to create this guide)
  • CPU: AMD Athlon II X4 620 Propus 2.6GHz 4 x 512KB L2 Cache Socket AM3 95W Quad-Core Processor - Retail
  • MOBO: GIGABYTE GA-MA785GMT-UD2H AM3 AMD 785G HDMI Micro ATX AMD Motherboard - Retail
  • RAM: G.SKILL Ripjaws Series 4GB (2 x 2GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1333 (PC3 10666) Desktop Memory Model F3-10666CL7D-4GBRH - Retail
  • HSF: COOLER MASTER Hyper 212 Plus Intel Core i5 & Intel Core i7 compatible RR-B10-212P-GP 120mm "heatpipe direct contact" Long ... - Retail
  • HDD: SAMSUNG Spinpoint F3 HD502HJ 500GB 7200 RPM 16MB Cache SATA 3.0Gb/s 3.5" Internal Hard Drive -Bare Drive
  • PSU: Antec earthwatts EA430 430W Continuous Power ATX12V v2.0 80 PLUS Certified Active PFC Power Supply - Retail
  • GPU: XFX HD-465X-YAF2 Radeon HD 4650 512MB 128-bit DDR2 PCI Express 2.0 x16 HDCP Ready CrossFire Supported Video Card - Retail
  • DVD: Sony Optiarc 24X DVD/CD Rewritable Drive Black SATA Model AD-7240S-0B - OEM
  • Case: Antec Three Hundred Illusion Black Steel ATX Mid Tower Computer Case - Retail
  • Thermal Compound: Arctic Silver 5 Thermal Compound - OEM

    Other links to help with deciding on what components to get.
  • Recommended Builds by Usage – This thread provides a very good guide of types of builds by usage at different price points.
  • *How To Ask For New Build Advice* - This is the best thread to review how to ask for advice and is a required format to get the best answers.
  • *Guide to Choosing Parts* - This thread provides a very good guide in choosing parts and provides many important links and ideas.
  • Homebuilt PC Buying Guide - This thread provides a good guide in choosing parts for a new build.

    Step Two: Prepare your case:
    In this step you want to get your case ready for the install. Others may have different opinions on what should or shouldn’t be done at this stage but these are the steps I undertake when building a PC.
  • Remove both side panels off of the case.
  • Determine how to route your case wires to provide good cable management.
    INSERT IMAGE

    Ready you case for your motherboard
  • Remove your motherboard from the box and protective covering.
  • Place the motherboard in the case to line up where the standoffs need to be placed.
  • Place the standoffs on the case in the locations matching up with your motherboard
    INSERT IMAGE

    Install Power Supply
    I choose to install the PSU during this phase of the process, so I can start planning in my mind how my cable management is going to flow for the build.
  • Remove the PSU from the box.
  • Place the PSU inside of the case and line up the with “PSU hole” on the case. Some cases have the PSU mounted at the top of the case, while others have it mounted at the bottom. For this build, the PSU is mounted at the bottom in the Antec 300
  • Connect the proper screws through the case to securely mount the PSU to the case.
  • Prepare the power supply cables for possible cable management. 1) For cases with room behind the MOBO tray, I recommend routing all of the wires through the opening in the top/bottom, so when you place the components inside the case, you can route them back inside the case for good cable management. 2) For cases with no room behind the MOBO tray, there isn’t much you can to prior with the cables to so just have them all setting outside of the case, as the case is laying on it’s side.
    INSERT IMAGE

    Install Hard Drive
  • Remove the HDD from the box/protective coving.
  • Remove HDD cage from case, if applicable.
  • Place drive into the internal 3.5” slot, in the appropriate location on your case. For my build, I’m installing in the lower HDD cage in the Antec 300.
  • Use the appropriate screws to screw the drive into the internal 3.5” slot. This isn’t required if you are using a tool less case or a “hot swaps” internal enclosure.
  • Install the HDD cage back into the case, if applicable.
    INSERT IMAGE

    Install CD/DVD Drive
  • Remove the drive from the box/protective coving.
  • Remove the front of the case to gain access to the external 3.5” panels, if applicable
  • Remove the appropriate bezel from the case in the location you want to install the drive.
  • Place drive into the external 3.5” slot, in the appropriate location on your case. For my build, I’m installing in the third slot down from the top in the Antec 300.
  • Use the appropriate screws to screw the drive into the external 3.5” slot. This isn’t required if you are using a tool less case.
  • Install the front of the case back on, if applicable.
    INSERT IMAGE
  • More about : testing post guide

    November 13, 2009 1:50:00 PM

    Looking good
    November 13, 2009 5:44:38 PM

    Is a Youtube link to an accompanying film in the works? I have a few suggestions in mind if the model build isn't working out.
    Related resources
    November 13, 2009 6:09:54 PM

    I wasn't planning on a YouTubed video. I was going to include pictures of the build steps, instead of a video. I'm open to suggestions before I get to far into... I have about 6 pages typed up in Word and I'm just on installing the heat sink on the CPU.
    November 13, 2009 6:14:50 PM

    Mention motor oil and toothpaste to be used as thermal compound. This idea has been discussed at length on the forum in the past and should be included in any worthy discussion/guide. Proceed with caution.
    November 13, 2009 7:44:18 PM

    NOOOO!!! I just used my Crest with Whitening plus Scope as my thermal compound on this build..

    :D 
    November 14, 2009 9:04:25 PM

    I'm thinking of writing a very special 'what not to do when building a computer'. I am well on my way with my Complete guide to Computer Security, a guideline. A few excerpts.

    Basic steps that you can take to make your computer secure:


    1. GET RID OF TEENAGERS - Teenagers are a major cause of computer trouble, because they think they're so smart, and they're always messing with things and changing things and installing things and swapping songs and downloading disgusting porno filth that they refuse to share with their parents. To prevent this from happening to you, get a good anti-teenager program such as Teen-B-Gone.

    2. CHECK FOR INCOMING ELECTRICITY - One factor common to many computer viruses is that, in order to function, they require electricity. Get down on your hands and knees and crawl under your desk; do you see a wire going from the computer to the wall? If so, chances are that - unbeknownst to you - this wire is bringing electricity directly into your house from a massive "power grid" that is also connected to prisons, crack houses, municipal sewage facilities, porno filth stores, etc. Yank it out. (The wire, we mean.) Then curl into a fetal position and REMAIN UNDER THE DESK, because there are new computer viruses out there now that can travel through the air and bypass your computer entirely and enter your brain via your dental fillings.

    3. You should immediately take the following steps to protect your computer from viruses:


    A. Determine what version of operating system your computer uses, and write this information on a piece of paper. If you don't know how to determine the version, just write down "Version 2.038."


    B. Now write down the numbers and expiration dates of all your credit cards.


    C. Now mail this information, along with your mother's maiden name, to
    WARNING WARNING DELETE DELETE

    Can I prepare a series of guides for the forum? Or can I.
    November 15, 2009 6:14:38 PM

    The guide looks good - though I should mention some people prefer to breadboard their machines, testing and installing the OS while it's uncased first. That way, if a part ends up malfunctioning, they don't have to disassemble anything.

    As for you, badge, I'm pretty sure you can do anything you want on the forums...I mean to say, you pretty much always do. But it's funny as hell, and you're not stupid, so no one minds. Exhibit A is your last post.
    November 15, 2009 7:46:48 PM

    frozenlead said:
    The guide looks good - though I should mention some people prefer to breadboard their machines, testing and installing the OS while it's uncased first. That way, if a part ends up malfunctioning, they don't have to disassemble anything.

    As for you, badge, I'm pretty sure you can do anything you want on the forums...I mean to say, you pretty much always do. But it's funny as hell, and you're not stupid, so no one minds. Exhibit A is your last post.


    Techmo should include a reminder if complications occur during assembly, a technical support person is only a phone call away and about as easy as reaching as the Pope, the difference being if you did reach the Pope he would probably be more helpful.
    November 15, 2009 8:53:02 PM

    The Pope knows his tech.
    November 15, 2009 11:09:17 PM

    Well, the actual post is up... I still need to edit my pictures and add them to the thread. You can check the thread out in my signature..

    Sorry... Badge... I didn't mention the Pope tech support. I'll look to update though. He is good for when you plug things in, start the PC up and it PC smokes, which leads you to say... "Holy-sh$!"
    November 16, 2009 9:46:28 PM

    Quote:

    1. GET RID OF TEENAGERS - Teenagers are a major cause of computer trouble, because they think they're so smart, and they're always messing with things and changing things and installing things and swapping songs and downloading disgusting porno filth that they refuse to share with their parents. To prevent this from happening to you, get a good anti-teenager program such as Teen-B-Gone.

    :lol:  I'm a teen and I know more about PCs than the average 30+ year old office worker. And yes, I do agree with you on the fact that most teens are id10ts who don't know WTF they are doing.
    November 16, 2009 9:58:16 PM

    Shadow703793 said:
    Quote:

    1. GET RID OF TEENAGERS - Teenagers are a major cause of computer trouble, because they think they're so smart, and they're always messing with things and changing things and installing things and swapping songs and downloading disgusting porno filth that they refuse to share with their parents. To prevent this from happening to you, get a good anti-teenager program such as Teen-B-Gone.

    :lol:  I'm a teen and I know more about PCs than the average 30+ year old office worker. And yes, I do agree with you on the fact that most teens are id10ts who don't know WTF they are doing.


    Shadow you are very excepional teen. Tell the secret of having an IQ of 753! LOL! I was thinking about that when I posted the Teen B gone solution. My 17 year old son just got his driver's license about a month ago. He has a restricted DL until he is 18. He can not operate the vehicle with others as passengers unless there is a 21 years old licensed driver in the car. And he can not operate the vehicle between 11pm and 5am. Last week, I caught him driving his 17 year old girlfriend around. He came home at midnight his past saturday. Teen B Gone...I need a triple dose!
    !