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My crazy plan to get / build a BF3 ready PC...am I stupid?

Last response: in Systems
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October 20, 2011 7:17:25 PM

Seriously, I need to know if this is a stupid plan. I made a post a little while ago about not wanting to build a PC on my own and was looking at CyberpowerPC but have decided against both options. I am kind of at an impasse.

I don't want to build my own and I don't want to get one from Cyberpower. Instead my strange mind has come up with the following plan based on several needs:

1. No interest financing options (I'm not poor but I like spreading payments out).

2. Keeping it under $1,200

3. Not having to build it myself

4. Being able to return it somewhere if its messed up.


And the master plan came to fruition:

1. Buy this with no interest for 18 months - Dell Studio XPS - Best Buy

2. Replace the video card (sell it on Ebay)

3. Buy this card - GTX 580 OR get Best Buy to price match this site (again no interest financing).

Is this a stupid plan? Seems reasonable to me. I am getting the processor I want, the amount of ram I want (I don't need super-duper-xtreme-lightningforce ram). It comes with Windows which I need as in I dont have a copy already. Good sized hard drive and its returnable.

What are your much more expert opinions than mine? Thanks in advance, everyone on here is so helpful so I do appreciate it.
October 20, 2011 7:30:58 PM

It's not a bad idea, but you will likely not be able to overclock. A quick google search determined that DELL uses their own custom motherboard, so you have a limited upgrade path. Lastly, RAM and HDD are likely generic brands. No SSD, no USB 3.0 etc etc.

For that price, it doesn't seem worth it to me. BUT, if security and financing are really important - then I guess this is your best option. In Canada, NCIX provides building services where you pick the parts and they will build it for an extra $50 with some support service. See if there are any stores that provide that.

Good luck!
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October 20, 2011 7:36:37 PM

You would be better off with Cyberpower pc. Dells are junk with uber cheap parts in them.
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October 20, 2011 7:39:28 PM

christop said:
You would be better off with Cyberpower pc. Dells are junk with uber cheap parts in them.


Really? Wow, I didn't know that. Also, not having usb 3.0 and a solid state drive are not concerns to me. Neither is overclocking as I do not plan to do it.



However, if someone has a better base computer (as in with the processor speed and ram i'm looking for) let me know.

I'm sure Best Buy has some other options that would fit what I'm trying to do.
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October 20, 2011 7:41:39 PM

can the dells power supply handle the upgraded graphics?


can you handle voiding the dells warranty the minute you open the case?
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October 20, 2011 7:46:01 PM

I have an 850w supply at home I could swap in, or just buy one for 75 bucks or so.

Is there a better PC brand I could get from Best Buy to match this price and specs? I am looking now but am having trouble finding one.
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October 20, 2011 7:52:22 PM

If you plan on making these changes, I am sure that will void your warrany - which was a reason for going with Best Buy anyway no?
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October 20, 2011 7:53:30 PM

I've worked on a lot of Dells, the power supply is usually the bare minimum for what came with the system.
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October 20, 2011 7:53:51 PM

Warranty voided, yes i'm sure, but I am thinking I could just hang onto the card / power supply and if anything goes wrong with it I could swap them back in and bring it up there.

I'm really starting to second guess the Dell. Anyone else have any opinions on them? I want to pull the trigger on this soon.
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October 20, 2011 7:58:38 PM

I had a Dell desktop like 8 years ago. It was good for a few years, but when I wanted to upgrade it was a nightmare. The RAM type was RDRAM, which cost an arm and a leg for an upgrade. Big video cards wouldn't fit etc. Their laptop line is pretty decent (I had a 6400).

How would the airflow be in these types of cases? I'm sure all it has is an exhaust. With a 580 in there I'm sure it'll get quite toasty.

Take a look at Lenovo maybe.
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October 20, 2011 8:16:49 PM

My advice don't deal with dell I had horrible support from them. Here is what I wrote on another thread on it, and I be honest this is a slimmed down and nice version of what I put up with.

"I dealt with dell tech support a LOT. Their the worst things known to man (Dell own alienware). Had to send in my laptop for hardware issues about 10times and they only fixed all the problems once. Sent it in for a busted dvd drive but they never fixed it except once, usually they sent it back to me without doing a single thing. So I had a faulty 2 dvd drive , and sent that in to be fixed probably around 7 times only fixed 1 time, as well as multiple faulty motherboard and power adapters from them, and 1 hard drive. Most times I had to send it in with multiple hardware problems as I gave up on the them fixing the dvd drive. And this was for a laptop that was babied and never suffered so much as a scratch on it.

Sorry for my little rant on them, which TBH is a very nice version of what I put up with them. But I wanted to give you an slight idea of what your dealing with if you every have to contact them for hardware issues."

Go with a different manufacturere, or better yet call a few of your local computer shops and ask them what it cost for them to build a PC for you. And I do mean actual computer shops not best buy, one of the local computer shops where I frequent I think would build one for you no problems, weither or not you bought the parts from them. They even build custom PC's and sell them on display. And I think they even used to host workshops to teach people how to build computers if I remember correctly.

On a final note, Best Buy, Dell, etc most major places are overpriced for computer and electronics ($20 for usb cable for example). So the best places to actually buy a computer are places like amazon, newegg, tigerdirect, and local mom and pop computer shops if you find a good one. The last one will probably even build you said computer for a small fee, or if you chat with them you might be able to get them to build it for you for free if you buy the parts from them.

And if you really wanted to make payments but the place your purchasing from doesn't have it, you can always talk to your bank to see if their willing to do it. Worst they can do is say is no. And going of memory I think Amazon, Newegg, and I would bet tigerdirect has those options of making payments, something to look into.
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October 20, 2011 8:29:11 PM

Match the below numbers with your numbers from the original post.

1) If you buy a PC from Newegg and get their prefered account it is no interest for 12 months on purchases over $500. I did this before and it's easy. I've heard of people getting burned on the Dell no interest deals.
2)easy
3)Where is the fun in that?
4)You can't return it to Best Buy unless you have THEIR geek squad support thing. Only if its DOA

1) I would never buy a Dell as a gamer. Not so easy to upgrade. A coworker bough a CyberPower PC and it's basically build from standard parts you can get on Newegg or elsewhere. Upgrading was easy as pie.
2)I'd keep it in case you want to see the PC someday and keep your gaming card. It won't be worth much in eBay.
3)Are you sure a GTX580 would even fit in that Dell case? I knew someone in that pickle and had to settle on a smaller, less power card because there was not enough space. Airflow isn't always the greatest in those.

Sorry to be negative, but OEM PC's usually don't make the best gamers unless you buy them as a gamer. That and a lot of us are enthusiasts and will steer you away from OEM.
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October 20, 2011 8:35:14 PM

Raven77 said:
I have an 850w supply at home I could swap in, or just buy one for 75 bucks or so.

Is there a better PC brand I could get from Best Buy to match this price and specs? I am looking now but am having trouble finding one.


At this point, why not just build one. Swapping out a PSU is just as much work as building one from scratch. It is a waste of time and money to be buying the PSU and GPU twice only to disassemble and reassemble the PC.
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October 20, 2011 8:40:39 PM

You've come to the wrong place if you're looking to justify buying a PC rather than building one. None of your reasoning holds water with me. Only grandmas & itards should buy computers.
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October 20, 2011 8:49:57 PM

The Dell PSU is probably 305W, maybe 350W; enough for the included HD6770, but nothing more. If you want to add a high-end GPU, Dell is NOT the way to go. If you really don't want to build your own (ok, but it's not that hard), a boutique vendor like Cyberpower can be ok, but their default selections try to cut corners too (like the PSU being an off-brand like Xion, and using the cheapest and slowest RAM).
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October 20, 2011 9:05:15 PM

I say NO to OEMs. Give your money to Cyberpower or IBuypower. Or you could buy the parts from newegg and ask someone around town to build it for you and pay him/her whatever he/she charges (it would be cheaper and better).
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October 20, 2011 9:06:09 PM

Raven77 said:
Seriously, I need to know if this is a stupid plan. I made a post a little while ago about not wanting to build a PC on my own and was looking at CyberpowerPC but have decided against both options. I am kind of at an impasse.

I don't want to build my own and I don't want to get one from Cyberpower. Instead my strange mind has come up with the following plan based on several needs:

1. No interest financing options (I'm not poor but I like spreading payments out).

2. Keeping it under $1,200

3. Not having to build it myself

4. Being able to return it somewhere if its messed up.


And the master plan came to fruition:

1. Buy this with no interest for 18 months - Dell Studio XPS - Best Buy

2. Replace the video card (sell it on Ebay)

3. Buy this card - GTX 580 OR get Best Buy to price match this site (again no interest financing).

Is this a stupid plan? Seems reasonable to me. I am getting the processor I want, the amount of ram I want (I don't need super-duper-xtreme-lightningforce ram). It comes with Windows which I need as in I dont have a copy already. Good sized hard drive and its returnable.

What are your much more expert opinions than mine? Thanks in advance, everyone on here is so helpful so I do appreciate it.


Don't buy a Dell. You will have to return it. The power supply will not be powerfull enough to power a GTX 580. You will be getting ripped off. Best Buy will not price match off a website either.

Build your own, its not hard at all. Go to newegg and order a kit. They have packages of everything you need and they offer financing.
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October 20, 2011 9:08:54 PM

Wow I had no idea that Newegg and them offered no interest with a preferred account.

I guess I need to check out Newegg and Tiger Direct to see what pre-builts they have available.

Also, im going to look into the local shop options for having them build it for me. Not sure if I have many local computer shops though.
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October 20, 2011 9:21:32 PM

I just signed up for a Newegg preferred account. This will get me 12 months no interest on purchases $500 and up?

I need to look further into this and come up with a new game plan.
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October 20, 2011 9:26:46 PM

BlackHawk91 said:
I say NO to OEMs. Give your money to Cyberpower or IBuypower. Or you could buy the parts from newegg and ask someone around town to build it for you and pay him/her whatever he/she charges (it would be cheaper and better).


Yeah but everything I've heard about Cyberpower - especially here - is that it seems their technical support is not to be trusted. I'd honestly go with the latter option. If you don't know how to build a system, or are uncomfortable doing so, chances are incredibly high that someone you know does. And they'd definitely be more than willing to help. I helped a coworker pick out the parts and build his system, and he got one that was way better than any of the OEMs he was looking at - including Cyberpower.
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October 20, 2011 10:20:15 PM

As I said before, contact your local mom and pop computer shops and ask them if they build a computer for you. Buy parts from newegg/tiger direct/amazon/ or them and get them to build it. This way you have complete control of what goes in it and won't have to overpay for things you don't need or buy additional parts to put in a computer while pulling out the part your replacing and (PSU/GPU upgrades etc).

Buying prebuilt is NOT the way to go, it's more hassle than building a computer. Building computers are actually easy, things are color coded sometimes and only fit in places which they are designed to fit in (You have to brute force something a LOT to fit it in a wrong slot). The only other thing you need to know is to ground yourself to the case before touching something, which you do by touching the case. And don't assemble when the power is on and your good.

And there is another benefit to building it yourself, the warrenties on it are for the part which tends to be at least as long or longer than buying prebuilt. Most stuff I see is 3year or lifetime warrenties as well as 1 year but buying something with a lifetime or 3year is usually a few dollars more. Compared to getting a set warrenty for a year or 2 and paying enourmous amounts for an additional warrenties, its just not worth it in my opinion. The only real downside to this is, you are the tech support, but considering your posting on here and seem to have some knowledge of computers I don't see that as much of an issue.
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