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2nd G-card for PhysX

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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August 22, 2011 3:10:07 PM

Hey,
I'm currently using a GTX 560 TI on my Intel DP45SG mother board it has 2x PCIe 2.0 slots on and also i have an extra gt 220 and 9400gt from my old builds.... I am a noob when it comes to Hardware so i wanted to ask if i could slap on the GT 220 on to the 2nd slot and use it for PhysX whild i still use the 560... Would that config bottle neck my performance or will it help improve Graphics on games. Thank you :D 

More about : 2nd card physx

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a b Î Nvidia
August 22, 2011 10:02:36 PM

The GT220 and 9400gt are far to weak for dedicated physx. If it is any thing less than a 9600gt then it is not worth the effort. The gtx 560ti is more than enough under it's own effort to run physx unless you are trying to max every thing out at 1920x1080 or higher.
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a b Î Nvidia
August 23, 2011 12:36:05 AM

Don't bother.

I read a recent article where they used a wide variety of cards specifically to figure out if it was worth adding a second card for PhysX.

Most configurations made things WORSE than using the single card by itself.

The only configuration that even improved things was with a GTX580 coupled with a card that was almost as powerful as itself (GTX570?) and who would setup a system that way considering the price?

The alternative is an SLI setup and I just finished reading an article on Tomshardware (you should read it) on the main page about micro-stuttering. The general conclusion is its simply best to ignore SLI and Crossfire and pay more for a single card with one GPU on it.
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a b Î Nvidia
August 23, 2011 1:11:18 AM

photonboy said:
Don't bother.

I read a recent article where they used a wide variety of cards specifically to figure out if it was worth adding a second card for PhysX.

Most configurations made things WORSE than using the single card by itself.

The only configuration that even improved things was with a GTX580 coupled with a card that was almost as powerful as itself (GTX570?) and who would setup a system that way considering the price?

The alternative is an SLI setup and I just finished reading an article on Tomshardware (you should read it) on the main page about micro-stuttering. The general conclusion is its simply best to ignore SLI and Crossfire and pay more for a single card with one GPU on it.


That is only so because most users are inexperienced and do not know how to properly setup a system with a dedicated card. Any thing less than a 9600gt will not be enough period and any thing more than a 8800gt is recommended. If there is bottleneck that is known before hand such as low clocked cpu or badly configured ram settings a dedicated card is best avoided. Third software must be properly installed and configured before adding the dedicated card. Last but not least is choosing what card to be paired with the main card or cards for sli/crossfire setups with a dedicated card. I have done this on my own dime a few times already and most do not know what they are doing so they see performance penalties vs a single card or traditional sli/crossfire.
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August 23, 2011 10:36:01 AM

Best answer selected by WaffleDude.
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August 23, 2011 10:39:44 AM

Thank You Guys!

I'll probably just sell off those 2 cards off now. Though i wish i had bought ATI cards now because my board only supports Crossfire :( .
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August 23, 2011 10:41:02 AM

Thank You Guys!

I'll probably just sell off those 2 cards off now. Though i wish i had bought ATI cards now because my board only supports Crossfire :( .
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