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Be upfront - 32bit or 64bit CPU

Last response: in Motherboards
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November 22, 2012 11:36:58 PM

Hello,
Why don't CPU & Mobo manufacturers label their products up front and in plain language it they are 32bit or 64bit architecture?
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November 23, 2012 12:22:45 AM

All current cpu's are 64bit (supporting 32bit as well)
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November 23, 2012 12:59:51 AM

What kitsune said. Unless you REALLY want to buy a piece of ancient hardware, you have nothing to worry about.
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November 23, 2012 1:07:58 AM

kitsunestarwind said:
All current cpu's are 64bit (supporting 32bit as well)

Okay, I'll accept that. However, I've been working CPU's/Mobo's for 20 years - how do you define "current"?
Also, that being said. Why don't they mark them, again "upfront", what they are? If it's a 64 be proud of it and say it. If it is just an 'old true-blue 32", suck it up and admit it. I hate MARKETING! Always their first instinct is to mislead.

I appreciate your reply and I'm not griping at you, just using you as a sounding board. Maybe some marketing guru at Intel or other manufacturing company will read this (not that they would pay the least bit of attention).

-=(Rich_am)=-
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November 23, 2012 1:14:02 AM

Numbers confuse people, your average consumer isn't bright. Once you start adding another label to it you are just going to confuse people even more. AMD CPUs have been 64 bit since the Athlon64 era, Intel Desktop CPUs have been 64 since the Prescott era of P4's in 2004, so i think current is fair.


Only some of the older Atom CPUs have been 32 bit, i believe the newer ones are 64 bit so all modern CPUs are 64 bit. Since they will work just fine with 64 bit or 32 bit software there is no need to add a label to them and increase confusion, it is best to refer people to if their OS is 32 bit or 64 bit already and match that since you would end up with the moron who is running Windows 7 32 bit on a 64 bit CPU and attempts to install a 64 bit program on it because their CPU is 64 bit even though their OS isn't.


Its important to remember that people in general just aren't that bright so the more unexplained information you give them the more likely you are to confuse them rather than educate them.
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November 23, 2012 1:26:40 AM

rich_am said:
Okay, I'll accept that. However, I've been working CPU's/Mobo's for 20 years - how do you define "current"?
Also, that being said. Why don't they mark them, again "upfront", what they are? If it's a 64 be proud of it and say it. If it is just an 'old true-blue 32", suck it up and admit it. I hate MARKETING! Always their first instinct is to mislead.

I appreciate your reply and I'm not griping at you, just using you as a sounding board. Maybe some marketing guru at Intel or other manufacturing company will read this (not that they would pay the least bit of attention).

-=(Rich_am)=-


I can understand that
Marketing on the other hand doesn't care because it's not a Selling point anymore, its just assumed as something that is supported
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November 23, 2012 1:36:33 AM

rich_am said:
Okay, I'll accept that. However, I've been working CPU's/Mobo's for 20 years - how do you define "current"?
Also, that being said. Why don't they mark them, again "upfront", what they are? If it's a 64 be proud of it and say it. If it is just an 'old true-blue 32", suck it up and admit it. I hate MARKETING! Always their first instinct is to mislead.

I appreciate your reply and I'm not griping at you, just using you as a sounding board. Maybe some marketing guru at Intel or other manufacturing company will read this (not that they would pay the least bit of attention).

-=(Rich_am)=-



If you've been working on PC's for the last 20 years, then the last 10-12 of those, PC's have been 64-bit.

I'm not what you're asking here or what your problem is unless you only work on P3's.
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November 23, 2012 1:41:39 AM

I didn't see this post first so I replied to the other post about the same thing, but the replies above pretty much say exactly what I did in the other post.

Best solution

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November 23, 2012 2:05:00 AM
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rich_am said:
Okay, I'll accept that. However, I've been working CPU's/Mobo's for 20 years - how do you define "current"?

Almost all AMD chips starting with the K7 around 2004 have been x86-64.
On Intel's side, x86-64 was supported on some P4 SKUs but did not become quite standard until Core2 in 2006.

So, 64bits desktop CPUs have been effectively standard for the last 5+ years.
November 23, 2012 8:36:33 PM

Best answer selected by rich_am.
November 23, 2012 8:41:15 PM

InvalidError said:
Almost all AMD chips starting with the K7 around 2004 have been x86-64.
On Intel's side, x86-64 was supported on some P4 SKUs but did not become quite standard until Core2 in 2006.

So, 64bits desktop CPUs have been effectively standard for the last 5+ years.


Thank you, for getting right to the crux of the question and giving a concise answer. Not trying to impress me with your "infused knowledge".
!