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Pentium D 960 or Core 2 Duo E4700

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January 23, 2012 2:28:16 PM

I am currently tossing around ideas for upgrading the CPU and memory on an old Thinkcentre M52 8113 desktop that I use as a minecraft server for some friends, an NAS box and a backup desktop should something happen to my main box (Phenom II X4).

If I understand correctly, I can't just throw in the fastest C2D I can find being that most of them aren't an 800Mhz FSB, which limits me to the E4700. But if I were to put in the PD 960, I get a faster clock speed and about double the L2 cache. It also appears to run cooler than my current Pentium 4 640 HT so I shouldn't have to swap out the heat sink/fan.

I was leaning more towards the D 960, but if anyone could toss in opinions one way or the other, that'd be great.
January 23, 2012 3:19:50 PM

I was actually in the exact same situation a few years ago, upgrading an old computer that was limited by the motherboard. Ideally a new motherboard would be a good idea, but if you're absolutely stuck with that one, go with the Core 2 Duo. It's a newer and better architecture, so will be a much faster processor regardless of clock speed.
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January 24, 2012 2:21:44 AM

Yeah I think I'm pretty much stuck, its a BTX board inside a BTX case, so I couldn't throw in a mini or micro ATX board without getting a new case to match, which would defeat the purpose of upgrading.

So if I was to go with a C2D as opposed to the Pentium D, do I have to stick with one that uses the 800Mhz FSB? I see on the Lenovo support site that it supports bus speeds of up to 1066Mhz, and Intel seems to verify this on their site saying that anything using the 945G chipset is compatible with a bunch of the C2D's in the 1066Mhz range, the fastest of which being the E6700, which would seem to be a considerable improvement over the E4700 if that were the case.
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January 24, 2012 2:40:17 AM

You should be able to go 1066 no problem. Make sure you have the latest BIOS first and see if the mobo (if you can find the actual manufacturer of it, Lenovo or a 3rd party) has a CPU compatibility list. Some mobos have compat lists, but not a lot of them. Otherwise, slap a 6700 in and hit the power button :) 
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