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I7 or i5

i would be mainly using system for gaming(decently), watching videos etc do i require an i7 or is the i5 perfect.ie i7 2600 or i5 2500(no overclocking). i want to be future proof to certain degree as i am not going to upgrade in distant future.
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  1. i5 is the way to go. Though I would get the K version, you can at least give it a slight overclock. The only advantage of an i7 is the hyperthreading witch is only useful for some video creating software, engineering programs, etc. For gaming it doesn't help at all.
  2. The i7 has 2mb more L3 cache, and hyper-threading, which doesn't really help in games. I would strongly suggest getting a k series chip and overclocking to even an easy 4Ghz. Much more performance as those chips can overclock very well!

    The 2500(k) is the way to go now-a-days. The 2600(k) is for video editing and massive multi-tasking.

    Hope this helps! :)
  3. Best answer
    you can do a slight OC (up to the turbo boost's max) on a 2500. The K series has better onboard graphics, and will allow for a 'more than slight' OC, but I always suggest against OCing unless you know what you are doing, in which case you would have suggested the K series anyways.

    Axeman is correct, the ONLY difference between the i5 and i7 is the Hyperthreading. The i5 comes from the same wafers, but have the HT aspect fused off (either due to demand or due to damage in that part of the chip). HT will only help if your programs support it, which (at least at this point in time) games do not. Only get the i7 if you intend to do video/photo editing, and even then it is not really required, but it will cut rendering time down a little. Spend that $100 towards a better GPU, SSD, or Monitor.
  4. for casual gaming and video playback, core i5 would be enough. i7 doesn't yet offer sizable advantage over i5 on those tasks.
    for gaming, gfx card is priority. pick a good gfx card first.
    if you don't oc, a core i5 2400 or 2500 should do. your gaming build should benefit from a z68 motherboard (usually supports cfx/sli).
    make sure you get a good psu (80+ rated, active pfc, lots of amps (35-40A) on the +12v rail(s)) to run your pc.
  5. de5_Roy said:
    for casual gaming and video playback, core i5 would be enough. i7 doesn't yet offer sizable advantage over i5 on those tasks.
    for gaming, gfx card is priority. pick a good gfx card first.
    if you don't oc, a core i5 2400 or 2500 should do. your gaming build should benefit from a z68 motherboard (usually supports cfx/sli).
    make sure you get a good psu (80+ rated, active pfc, lots of amps (35-40A) on the +12v rail(s)) to run your pc.



    an i5 2400 is good enough for games too


    some people dont overclock/want to overclock.


    i believe the only difference between i5 2400 and i5 2500 is a couple hundred Mhz

    there both over 3Ghz though so there both still fast
  6. In my opinion, an i5 is good enough. I just built a new system the other day using an i5 2500. Seems really snappy, and has a ATI 5770 in as the video card. If you need a new motherboard though there's a deal at Micro Center where you can buy the i5 2500k and get an ASUS P8Z68-M PRO motherboard for a good price. The CPU is 179.99 and the motherboard is 74.99. Then just add in tax. Wish I had done that instead when I built this last system. Getting a Z68 MB and the i5 2500 cost about $45 more. But I don't have a micro center in this state.
  7. the i7 doesn't offer anything over the i5.

    hyperthreading is useless in gaming and oftern hurts frame rates. You'd also never see it used in general computing. Its only good in heavily threaded CPU intensive programs and even then not help too much. No games in the future will tsake advantage of hyperthreading even if they are heavily threaded because of the delays associated with it during uneven workloads.

    The i7 is pretty much a scam for people who have too much money. You'd be better off with an AMD FX than a i7 in rendering and video editing for less money. The i5 is much cheaper and offers the same performance.
  8. CaedenV said:
    you can do a slight OC (up to the turbo boost's max) on a 2500. The K series has better onboard graphics, and will allow for a 'more than slight' OC, but I always suggest against OCing unless you know what you are doing, in which case you would have suggested the K series anyways.

    Axeman is correct, the ONLY difference between the i5 and i7 is the Hyperthreading. The i5 comes from the same wafers, but have the HT aspect fused off (either due to demand or due to damage in that part of the chip). HT will only help if your programs support it, which (at least at this point in time) games do not. Only get the i7 if you intend to do video/photo editing, and even then it is not really required, but it will cut rendering time down a little. Spend that $100 towards a better GPU, SSD, or Monitor.

    The i7 doesn't just have HT, it also has 2mb more L3 cache which seems to be overlooked a lot. Also, how can you say don't OC if you don't know how? Everyone learns sometime. OCing a minor amount (up to 4-4.4ghz) with SB chips and a decent cooler isn't tricky at all. It is really easy and he probably won't have any issues if he reads a guide or two.
  9. i say go i5 2500k
  10. get the k version, when it starts getting slow in the next 2 years. You can oc to keep up with the current cpu's
  11. Best answer selected by anish449.
  12. thanks for the reply guys
  13. This topic has been closed by Mousemonkey
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