Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Closed

Can CPU be damaged from shutting down too fast?

Last response: in CPUs
Share
January 24, 2012 6:10:44 AM

This may sound extremely weird but hear me out. I will first explain how it started I recently built a new pc. Then later a few weeks I noticed a fan was missing from the case. Told the seller and I got a free fan. I later found out the front of the case where the fan is suppose to be is stuck. Which explain why manufacturer didn't put a fan there in the first place. I didn't want to waste the fan so I had a crazy idea. I decided to use TAPE to stick the fan to the side of the case from the inside. It worked and decreased the the cpu temp by about 2 Celsius. I then later played bc2 for a bit. Then the tape got loose and the fan dropped off in the case while pc was running. I panicked and quickly closed bc2 and shut down the pc immediately, afraid the fan may hit some of the hardware in the case. After the pc shut down, I took it out and reapplied the tape back on the fan. When I placed it back and booted up the pc. I get a weird post beep and then nothing. The fan is running and that's about it. This is the SOUND I hear after pushing power up button.
Fan start->Reading hard drive->Fan accelerate then decelerate->Short shriek post beep->Fan stabilize
Then the fan keeps running and nothing happens, no on screen information is shown at all.
Some information to note:
When the fan came loose and was hanging inside the case. There is no sound of the fan hitting anything. In fact the pc ran without a problem when the fan came off.
I did NOT force shut down. I shut down the safe way by pressing start then shut down.
When shutting down, I had a quick glance at my temperature of the cpu at the desktop. It was still 46-48 Celsius since I just shut down bc2.

Could it be possible when I shut off my pc, which caused the fan to stop spinning. It overheated my cpu since I shut the fan down too soon? I didn't give the fan enough time to cool down the cpu before shutting down? This is what I think may have happened. I am just a kid anyway, just one of my crazy hypothesis.

Any help will be appreciated. Will it be helpful if I post what the post beep sound like? I heard the post beep is used to tell user what problem is occurring.

Best solution

a c 184 à CPUs
January 24, 2012 6:24:33 AM
Share

Something must be loose.
January 24, 2012 7:07:29 AM

amuffin said:
Something must be loose.

Will posting here what my post beep sound like help identify which component is loose?
Related resources
a c 184 à CPUs
January 24, 2012 7:10:34 AM

Why not just open up your computer and verify the fan that got knocked down didn't loosten any cables, ram, sata stuff like that :) 
a b à CPUs
January 24, 2012 7:15:39 AM

^+1 reseat everything, if you had a heat sink that was really realy small, (but effective), then the cpu temp would stay hot, possibly even get hotter, but you probably don't even the stock HSF would oull heat from the CPU into itself quickly enough to pull the temp of the CPU down. So realistically I don't think it would have hurt. You used to be able to get a product called afterburner that ran CPU and case fans for about 5mins after shutdown, but this was in the days of pitifully small heatsinks and ridiculously hot chips 60+idle.
January 24, 2012 7:41:34 AM

13thmonkey said:
^+1 reseat everything, if you had a heat sink that was really realy small, (but effective), then the cpu temp would stay hot, possibly even get hotter, but you probably don't even the stock HSF would oull heat from the CPU into itself quickly enough to pull the temp of the CPU down. So realistically I don't think it would have hurt. You used to be able to get a product called afterburner that ran CPU and case fans for about 5mins after shutdown, but this was in the days of pitifully small heatsinks and ridiculously hot chips 60+idle.


So your saying it's very unlikely my processor is causing the problem?
a b à CPUs
January 24, 2012 8:13:10 AM

Reset the Cmos by taking the battery out of the motherboard and try again.
January 24, 2012 10:24:46 AM

silverliquicity said:
Reset the Cmos by taking the battery out of the motherboard and try again.


What will that do? I read on the internet you do that when you mess up by overclocking in the bios. How will this help me? Sorry if I'm being too questioning. I just don't want to raise the problem meter even higher. I'm going to bring the pc to technicians a few weeks later because it is new year and all of them is taking vacation. I'm trying to see if there's anyway to fix it myself first.
February 5, 2012 11:48:12 AM

Best answer selected by crystal6tak.
a b à CPUs
February 5, 2012 11:57:16 AM

This topic has been closed by Mousemonkey
!