Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Solved

Finally Finished....i think :/

Last response: in Systems
Share
October 24, 2011 7:19:03 AM

Ive finally finished looking around for parts for my new PC build here it is.
Processor
- Intel i7-2600k
Motherboard
- ASUS Maximus IV Extreme-Z
Graphics Card
-EVGA GeForce GTX 580 Classified 3072MB x2
RAM
-Dominator® GT with DHX Pro Connector and Airflow II Fan — 12GB Triple Channel DDR3 Memory Kit
Hard Drives
-Intel 510 Series (Elm Crest) SSDSC2MH120A2K5 2.5" 120GB SATA III MLC Internal Solid State Drive
-Western Digital Caviar Black WD1501FASS 1.5TB 7200 RPM 64MB Cache SATA 3.0Gb/s 3.5" IHD x2
PSU
-Antec High Current Pro HCP-1200 1200W ATX12V / EPS12V SLI Ready 80 PLUS GOLD Certified PSU
Case
-Corsair Obsidian Series 800D CC800DW Black Aluminum / Steel ATX Full Tower Computer Case
Monitor
-Asus VE248H Black 24" 1920X1080 2ms Full HD HDMI LED Backlight LCD Monitor x2 :) 
Drives
-ASUS Black 12X BD-ROM 16X DVD-ROM 48X CD-ROM SATA Internal Blu-ray Drive Model BC-12B1ST/BLK/B/AS - OEM

Thats pretty much it other then a cooling system, which ill be water cooling, just havent figured out if i want to go custom loop or with a XSPC RX360.

One question i want to ask is does this build look alright and is there anything i could maybe upgrade on this list, or maybe something i completely missed?

Thanks Alot Guys :) 

More about : finally finished

October 24, 2011 7:39:19 AM

The only issue that I can see is using the 12GB Triple Channel DDR3 Memory Kit. Sandy Bridge motherboards only support dual channel DDR3 so for maximum efficiency go with either 8GB (2x 4gb modules) or 16GB (4x 4GB Modules). Other than that looks like a nice build.
October 24, 2011 7:46:22 AM

You're using triple channel memory. Sandy is designed for dual channel memory @ 1.5V.

Go for Corsair Vengeance or G-Skill RipJaws XL 1600MHz in 8Gb.

If using GTX580 in SLI, I think you're wasting the power by using a 1920x1080 resolution.

It begs for 2560x1440 or 2560x1600 resolution. ie 27" Dell U2711 or higher. Or get another pair of 24" and run NV Surround.

Your case is excellent. When building, be careful as paint chips easily. Go with custom water loop. Not as hard as it looks.

If only for gaming, an i5 2500K is plenty, although with your specs, why skimp on CPU?lol

You will love the board.

I am using same CPU, Motherboard and case.

Have fun with build.
Related resources
October 24, 2011 7:46:59 AM

I would also say save $100 and switch the 2600k for a 2500k, not much difference.

Good luck!

Best solution

October 24, 2011 8:44:29 AM
Share

Hello, your build looks very well thought out I have a couple of comments:

1. The Intel 510 is only competitive in speed for compressed data and large files - otherwise it is much slower than the top SSDs. Right now the Mushkin Chronos Deluxe is the fastest 120 GB SSD on the planet with the Patriot Wildfire and Kingston Hyper X Extreme in second place. The Mushkin has superior flash memory to most SSDs (the Patriot Wildfire also has the same flash memory chips). Also, though I have not verified it, the Crucial M4 seems to work better for compressed data and random 4k tranfers, however the Mushkin Deluxe pretty much spanks the M4 in almost all other categories. The sole claim to fame for the Intel SSDs is their reputed reliability, but that has not been verified.

2. You are right to consider the Antec 1200. In one review that I read it actually beat the Corsair AX1200, but that is only in one review. I just read a new review of the Corsair AX 1200 and its LOWEST efficiency was 92% up to 1000W. It was OVER 93% efficiency most of the time. The professional reviewer stated it was unprecedented and "off the charts." It also put out 1536W AND remained stable - which is phenomenal. at 1200W it was over 90% efficiency and just missed reaching platinum levels. It did all this while keeping ripple suppression astonishingly low - even at full load.

The link to the review is here: http://www.kitguru.net/components/power-supplies/zardon...

I think the one review that I read that the Antec 1200 beat the AX 1200 was an outlier because I have read maybe a dozen professional reviews that list better performance for the AX 1200 than the Antec 1200.

The Corsair AX 1200, is more efficient, cheaper, has a 7-year warranty and is fully modular. I think it is the better choice for those reasons.

3. I have the Corsair 650D which is very similar to the 800D and I love it. The 800D is legendary and almost universally praised. It is the perfect case for water cooling.

4. You don't list the use for your computer but with a GTX 580 you must be a gamer. You probably want to overclock and that is why you are going with water cooling. If you don't want the hassle of constructing your own water cooling system, the Corsair H100 is getting rave reviews and is made for your case. It is no maintenance and it carries a 5 year warranty

5. In recent reviews that I have read, the 2600K does outperform the 2500K CPU by a noticeable margin and so I think it is worth the extra $100. Granted the 2500K is a powerful CPU, but the 2600K is better. I got my 2600K from Amazon for $292 and so it only cost me about $75 more than the 2500K.

6. I love the Asus Maximus Extreme boards but the reviews that I read have stated that a lot of the features would never be used or were buggy (bluetooth). Also I don't think that motherboard is Ivy Bridge compatible and PCI-E compliant. This will be important to you in about one year. Therefore, you may want to look at the AsRock Extreme 7 Gen 3 motherboard. It is getting rave reviews and is a great overclocking board. It is also Ivy Bridge compatible and will work with PCI-E 3.0. It is also cheaper than the Asus Maximus Extreme and has almost all of the same features. The BIOS interface also has been improved (something Asus is famous for).

I bought the Asus Pro V Z68 and the board was bad. Asus's customer service was among the worst I have ever experienced. Their boards are supposed to be good, but they don't take care of their customers that's for sure. That is why I am leery of them.

7. Watch Newegg for sales on the Asus bluray burner. The OEM version was on sale about a month ago for $80, which is phenomenal. I got the LiteON iHBS212 on sale for $104 which also was a great deal.

Get Power DVD Ultra 11 on Amazon ($62 for the disk only) and you will be able to play any bluray disk. I haven't tried burning anything yet and so I don't know if Power DVD 11 even enables burning.

8. The WD Caviar Blacks are fast HDDs however, the Samsung F3 Spinpoint 1 TB drives go on sale on Newegg for $50 regularly and mine reaches 115 mb/s on ATTO which is nearly as fast as the WD drives. Keep in mind that single table 1 TB HDDs are coming out soon and they will be around 175 mb/s.

9. I have your Asus optical drive and it works great - I can recommend it

10. The 580 is the king of the hill no doubt but it will be totally obsolete when PCI-E 3.0 cards come out in less than a year. You may want to go to the 570 or a 6950 so that you do not lose so much money when you upgrade. You can get a 1 GB 6950 right now for around $200 and it is a very powerful card. That would give you approximately $300 in savings to upgrade to the new PCI-E 3.0 GPUs.

Hope this helps - good luck with your build. I am envious of the 800D, ha, ha.
October 24, 2011 9:04:45 AM

Here is a quote from Kit Guru on the Corsair AX 1200:

"The AX1200W power supply from Corsair isn’t just their best unit, its easily the best power supply on the market right now and we think it will be some time before we see results like these again. We were so surprised with some of the results that we reran them multiple times over a period of several days – just in case our eyes, and testing equipment were playing tricks with us.

The efficiency ratings are off the charts, with results over 93% between 600 and 900W and over 90% even at full load. These really are staggering results which we never thought we would see, not for some years anyway.

Ripple is class leading, there is no doubt about it and most of the time the rails just hold a flat line, as if its just died on the test bench. Rail stability is another of the many strong points with miniscule movement even under heavy cross loading.

When you see a KitGuru lab technican with an incredulous smile on his face as he says “Hey, this is holding at 1545W!” you realise that this is something very special indeed. It is a modern day work of art. It would have scored 10/10 but we have to leave a little room for their next unit, because as incredible as it sounds, it might be even better."
October 25, 2011 6:32:01 AM

Best answer selected by Shmister.
October 25, 2011 6:33:03 AM

Thanks for the reply guys! Im going to take all this into consideration and tweak a few things. I will re-post my new build as soon as i get it figured out. :) 
October 26, 2011 2:41:48 AM

Shmister said:
Thanks for the reply guys! Im going to take all this into consideration and tweak a few things. I will re-post my new build as soon as i get it figured out. :) 


Let us know how your build comes out. I am really curious - it would be great to hear some first-hand feedback on a 800D build. That is a beautiful case :) .

If you are only going to use one monitor you may want to look at an HIPS monitor. The Dell U2410 and the HP 2475W are the two best bang for the buck HIPS monitors. I own the HP2475W and I have been very pleased with it.

The HIPS monitors have a superior picture the the Asus TN monitors. Asus has also just put out an HIPS monitor that is about equal tiwht the HP and the Dell listed above, but I do not remember its model number. I think the HP 2475 is perhaps slightly better than the Asus or the Dell. All three HIPS monitors are far superior to any TN monitor. However, the HIPS monitors range in price from $450 (on sale) to $550 and so they are quite a bit more expensive. They are also slightly slower than the TN monitors and so if you play a lot of "quick jerk" games where every micro-second is important, then the TN monitor may be a better choice.

Good luck with your build.
October 26, 2011 5:14:02 AM

I was looking for a dual Monitor setup, any recommendation on some great but fairly cheap monitors? Trying to sort out the rest of my build at the momment. :)  Thanks flong!

Posted my updated build on another thread. Input there would be greatly appreciated. :) 
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/324880-31-revised-bui...
October 26, 2011 6:44:33 AM

Shmister said:
I was looking for a dual Monitor setup, any recommendation on some great but fairly cheap monitors? Trying to sort out the rest of my build at the momment. :)  Thanks flong!


For a cheap HIPS monitor (if there is such a thing) HP's ZR24W is an excellent monitor that gives the Dell U2410 and the HP 2475W a run for their money but it can be found for $350 on sale.

For TN monitors, the gamers swear by Asus. Asus has several 24" monitors with TFT / TN screens. I am unqualified to tell you which one is the best. They cost $150 - $200 and frequently go on sale at Newegg. If you are using two or three monitors then a lot of gamers are going to these monitors because three of them cost as much as one HIPS / IPS monitor.

The trade off is that their color is not as accurate and their overall picture is inferior. However, they are faster than the IPS monitors and cheap which makes them great for gaming.

I would suggest you start a separate thread and ask the gamers which Asus 24" monitor is best for gaming. Then double check the recommendations by reading reviews. Remember not all recommendations are correct. TFTcentral is one good website to check reviews. Here is the link: http://www.tftcentral.co.uk/
!