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Best lenses for Canon DRebel

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Anonymous
April 15, 2005 11:13:09 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

As a newbie to DSLRs, having "graduated" from P&S cameras, I would like
to know what are the recommended lenses that I should consider, beyond
the original kit lens that came with the camera, that is. The really
expensive ones are out of the question, but over time I plan to get at
least a couple of lenses that will be good choices for such varied
pursuits as portraits, landscapes and "city photography." Perhaps some
action photos too. Aside from the kit lens, I already have a 28-105
(the good one). Any further suggestions?

More about : lenses canon drebel

Anonymous
April 15, 2005 6:29:23 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <1113574389.158932.131900@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com>,
Babysinister <zeabned@earthlink.net> wrote:
>As a newbie to DSLRs, having "graduated" from P&S cameras, I would like
>to know what are the recommended lenses that I should consider, beyond
>the original kit lens that came with the camera, that is. The really
>expensive ones are out of the question, but over time I plan to get at
>least a couple of lenses that will be good choices for such varied
>pursuits as portraits, landscapes and "city photography." Perhaps some
>action photos too. Aside from the kit lens, I already have a 28-105
>(the good one). Any further suggestions?

For portraits and short telephoto work, get the Canon 50mm f/1.8. It's the
cheapest lens they do, and certainly the best value-for-money.
Anonymous
April 15, 2005 9:08:32 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

I agree with Chris. You have most situations already covered. The 50mm
1.8 in the dRebel is a great portrait lens and it is not expensive. It also
may make a good low light lens.

As for other lenses, I suggest working with what you have. See what you
may want based on those situations you encounter that your present lenses do
not do well.

--
Joseph Meehan

Dia's Muire duit
"Chris Brown" <cpbrown@ntlworld.no_uce_please.com> wrote in message
news:uhv4j2-cie.ln1@narcissus.dyndns.org...
> In article <1113574389.158932.131900@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com>,
> Babysinister <zeabned@earthlink.net> wrote:
>>As a newbie to DSLRs, having "graduated" from P&S cameras, I would like
>>to know what are the recommended lenses that I should consider, beyond
>>the original kit lens that came with the camera, that is. The really
>>expensive ones are out of the question, but over time I plan to get at
>>least a couple of lenses that will be good choices for such varied
>>pursuits as portraits, landscapes and "city photography." Perhaps some
>>action photos too. Aside from the kit lens, I already have a 28-105
>>(the good one). Any further suggestions?
>
> For portraits and short telephoto work, get the Canon 50mm f/1.8. It's the
> cheapest lens they do, and certainly the best value-for-money.
Related resources
Anonymous
April 16, 2005 1:13:17 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <1113574389.158932.131900@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com>,
"Babysinister" <zeabned@earthlink.net> wrote:

> As a newbie to DSLRs, having "graduated" from P&S cameras, I would like
> to know what are the recommended lenses that I should consider, beyond
> the original kit lens that came with the camera, that is. The really
> expensive ones are out of the question, but over time I plan to get at
> least a couple of lenses that will be good choices for such varied
> pursuits as portraits, landscapes and "city photography." Perhaps some
> action photos too. Aside from the kit lens, I already have a 28-105
> (the good one). Any further suggestions?

This depends entirely on the type of photos you want to shoot. There is
no one right answer to your question. For example, if you intend to
shoot a lot of photos at auto races, you will need a very fast lens (one
with a wide opening) to let in a lot of light and allow for a fast
shutter speed. On the other hand, if you plan to shoot a lot of
portraits, the need for a very fast lens isn't so important. So the best
lens for you to buy is the one that you think best fits the kind of
photography you intend to do. You may also find that you need more than
one lens, especially if your interests in photography vary widely.
April 16, 2005 1:36:02 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

I would (and Have) go with the 75-300 IS which is a very good lens for the
money and will do until and unless you end up shooting professionally. I may
have to buy a second one if I start shooting a lot again. My wife is
beginning to object to my taking it off her camera.

--
http://www.chapelhillnoir.com
home of The Camera-ist's Manifesto
The Improved Links Pages are at
http://www.chapelhillnoir.com/links/mlinks00.html
A sample chapter from "Haight-Ashbury" is at
http://www.chapelhillnoir.com/writ/hait/hatitl.html

"Babysinister" <zeabned@earthlink.net> wrote in message
news:1113574389.158932.131900@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
> As a newbie to DSLRs, having "graduated" from P&S cameras, I would like
> to know what are the recommended lenses that I should consider, beyond
> the original kit lens that came with the camera, that is. The really
> expensive ones are out of the question, but over time I plan to get at
> least a couple of lenses that will be good choices for such varied
> pursuits as portraits, landscapes and "city photography." Perhaps some
> action photos too. Aside from the kit lens, I already have a 28-105
> (the good one). Any further suggestions?
>
Anonymous
April 16, 2005 6:48:04 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

I'll "third" that. The 50mm is gives you nearly 3 stops of aperture over the
kit lens. It is only around $75-80.

Another to consider is the 80-200mmII. It is only around $100. Angle of view
is equiv. to 320mm in 35mm format. Canon's own MTF charts showing it to be
superior to the 75-300 zooms, but of course, it doesn't have the reach., but
it is less expensive and it is compact.

For under $200, you can get 2 decent lenses!
John

"Joseph Meehan" <sligojoe_Spamno@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:kyS7e.1297$Qu2.263@tornado.ohiordc.rr.com...
> I agree with Chris. You have most situations already covered. The
> 50mm 1.8 in the dRebel is a great portrait lens and it is not expensive.
> It also may make a good low light lens.
>
> As for other lenses, I suggest working with what you have. See what
> you may want based on those situations you encounter that your present
> lenses do not do well.
>
> --
> Joseph Meehan
>
> Dia's Muire duit
> "Chris Brown" <cpbrown@ntlworld.no_uce_please.com> wrote in message
> news:uhv4j2-cie.ln1@narcissus.dyndns.org...
>> In article <1113574389.158932.131900@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com>,
>> Babysinister <zeabned@earthlink.net> wrote:
>>>As a newbie to DSLRs, having "graduated" from P&S cameras, I would like
>>>to know what are the recommended lenses that I should consider, beyond
>>>the original kit lens that came with the camera, that is. The really
>>>expensive ones are out of the question, but over time I plan to get at
>>>least a couple of lenses that will be good choices for such varied
>>>pursuits as portraits, landscapes and "city photography." Perhaps some
>>>action photos too. Aside from the kit lens, I already have a 28-105
>>>(the good one). Any further suggestions?
>>
>> For portraits and short telephoto work, get the Canon 50mm f/1.8. It's
>> the
>> cheapest lens they do, and certainly the best value-for-money.
>
>
!