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What is RIP? Who needs it?

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April 15, 2005 11:57:56 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

What is RIP? Who needs it?

More about : rip

April 15, 2005 11:57:57 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"nobody" <nobody@nowhere.com.re> wrote in message
news:BE85CD44.3C65%nobody@nowhere.com.re...
> What is RIP? Who needs it?

In what context have you seen it used?
Anonymous
April 15, 2005 11:57:57 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

nobody wrote:
> What is RIP? Who needs it?

RIPs are Raster Image Processors, they were originally designed to take
the different parts of a page made in Quark, Pagemaker or Indesign and
convert it to a printable form and control the printer (much more than
just a driver). Over the years RIPs have evolved into highly flexible
printer controlers. If you are doing a lot of large format printing
then you may need a RIP, but if you just want to use an Epson 4000 for
personnal use no. Photoshop, Epson and HP have made their software so
well there may even be a question if you need a RIP at all.

Tom
Related resources
Anonymous
April 16, 2005 12:11:22 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"nobody" <nobody@nowhere.com.re> wrote in message
news:BE85CD44.3C65%nobody@nowhere.com.re...
> What is RIP? Who needs it?
>
Those who have just died maybe?
H.
Anonymous
April 16, 2005 12:25:38 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

It's a method of passing data from a datasource to a printer, bloody quick,
capable of moving large amounts of data very quickly. useful if you ''re DTP
ing a catalogue to a high end laser printer. It'll print several times
faster than using standard methods. Not all printers are capable of using a
RIP. Most that are are networkable, and expensive when new.


"nobody" <nobody@nowhere.com.re> wrote in message
news:BE85CD44.3C65%nobody@nowhere.com.re...
> What is RIP? Who needs it?
>
April 16, 2005 12:25:39 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Apparently it makes color profiling much easier too. Expensive though,
like $400-800.

canongirly wrote:

> It's a method of passing data from a datasource to a printer, bloody quick,
> capable of moving large amounts of data very quickly. useful if you ''re DTP
> ing a catalogue to a high end laser printer. It'll print several times
> faster than using standard methods. Not all printers are capable of using a
> RIP. Most that are are networkable, and expensive when new.
>
>
> "nobody" <nobody@nowhere.com.re> wrote in message
> news:BE85CD44.3C65%nobody@nowhere.com.re...
>
>>What is RIP? Who needs it?
>>
>
>
>
Anonymous
April 16, 2005 12:25:39 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

canongirly wrote:

> It's a method of passing data from a datasource to a printer,

I always thought it was a net protocol: (Routing information Protocol)
I imagine it might have some value with networked printers.

Read about it here:

http://www.cisco.com/univercd/cc/td/doc/cisintwk/ito_do...
Anonymous
April 16, 2005 12:27:23 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

nobody wrote:
> What is RIP? Who needs it?


Remote Imaging Protocol.

These days probably no one needs it.

In the "olden" days of BBS's it was a way that graphics
could be displayed over an ansi-like connection.

Ken
April 16, 2005 1:08:36 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Thank you. I understand that the Epson 7600 is excruciatingly slow, eg. for
large prints. Would RIP make it print quicker?


On 15/4/05 8:25 pm, in article d3p4fg$hgc$1@newsg2.svr.pol.co.uk,
"canongirly" <me@me.com> wrote:

> It's a method of passing data from a datasource to a printer, bloody quick,
> capable of moving large amounts of data very quickly. useful if you ''re DTP
> ing a catalogue to a high end laser printer. It'll print several times
> faster than using standard methods. Not all printers are capable of using a
> RIP. Most that are are networkable, and expensive when new.
>
>
> "nobody" <nobody@nowhere.com.re> wrote in message
> news:BE85CD44.3C65%nobody@nowhere.com.re...
>> What is RIP? Who needs it?
>>
>
>
April 16, 2005 1:32:20 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Rest In Peace --- Everyone needs it.
If you are talking about photo printing however, you don't need it
unless you are into serious desktop publishing, heavy duty raster drawing
programs like Corel Draw (Although I simply uotput my CorelDraw files to
PSDs and print them as RGB files), or colour seps for magazine or similar
use. For most inkjet and laser printing all you need are a photo editing
program and the printer's native software.

--
http://www.chapelhillnoir.com
home of The Camera-ist's Manifesto
The Improved Links Pages are at
http://www.chapelhillnoir.com/links/mlinks00.html
A sample chapter from "Haight-Ashbury" is at
http://www.chapelhillnoir.com/writ/hait/hatitl.html

"nobody" <nobody@nowhere.com.re> wrote in message
news:BE85CD44.3C65%nobody@nowhere.com.re...
> What is RIP? Who needs it?
>
April 16, 2005 2:20:02 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Thanks. Would this apply to the Epson 7600?


On 15/4/05 9:21 pm, in article
1113596493.839243.108200@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com, "tomm101"
<monego@valley.net> wrote:

>
> nobody wrote:
>> What is RIP? Who needs it?
>
> RIPs are Raster Image Processors, they were originally designed to take
> the different parts of a page made in Quark, Pagemaker or Indesign and
> convert it to a printable form and control the printer (much more than
> just a driver). Over the years RIPs have evolved into highly flexible
> printer controlers. If you are doing a lot of large format printing
> then you may need a RIP, but if you just want to use an Epson 4000 for
> personnal use no. Photoshop, Epson and HP have made their software so
> well there may even be a question if you need a RIP at all.
>
> Tom
>
Anonymous
April 16, 2005 3:09:42 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

nobody <nobody@nowhere.com.re> wrote:

> Thanks. Would this apply to the Epson 7600?
>
>
I strongly recommend the QTR rip for the 7600 IF you're trying to do
monochrome printing.
Anonymous
April 16, 2005 3:39:46 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"nobody" <nobody@nowhere.com.re> wrote in message
news:BE85DDD4.3C82%nobody@nowhere.com.re...
> Thank you. I understand that the Epson 7600 is excruciatingly slow, eg.
> for
> large prints. Would RIP make it print quicker?
>
Yes.
Anonymous
April 16, 2005 3:39:47 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Fri, 15 Apr 2005 23:39:46 +0100, "canongirly" <me@me.com> wrote:

>
>"nobody" <nobody@nowhere.com.re> wrote in message
>news:BE85DDD4.3C82%nobody@nowhere.com.re...
>> Thank you. I understand that the Epson 7600 is excruciatingly slow, eg.
>> for
>> large prints. Would RIP make it print quicker?
>>
>Yes.


That's just not true. Epsons and most other
inkjet printers are limited in speed mostly by
physical and mechanical considerations -- not
by data transfer rates. (Epsons are pretty
much the slowest.)

RIP most often means "Raster Image Processor"
which nowadays mostly means a fancy third
party program that substitutes for the
standard Epson Print driver that comes with
the machine and is available for the down-
loading.

RIPs offer various controls and optimizations
over the standard driver, but their use
requires a good deal of skill and expense.
Definitely not for most amateurs and casual
users.

Apparently there's another meaning, to wit,
"Remote Imaging Protocol" which is probably
what you're thinking of. But in all my
years hanging out on various Epson lists,
I've never heard it used in that context.


rafe b.
http://www.terrapinphoto.com
Anonymous
April 16, 2005 3:06:35 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"rafe bustin" <rafeb@speakeasy.net> wrote in message
news:iol0611fp522460b1fjle2evbi4il07j6e@4ax.com...
>>"nobody" <nobody@nowhere.com.re> wrote in message
>>news:BE85DDD4.3C82%nobody@nowhere.com.re...
>>> Thank you. I understand that the Epson 7600 is excruciatingly slow, eg.
>>> for
>>> large prints. Would RIP make it print quicker?
>>>
>>Yes.
>
>
> That's just not true.

<snip>

> But in all my
> years hanging out on various Epson lists,
> I've never heard it used in that context.
> rafe b.

So not from actual use then....which IS my experience and the RIP made it a
hell of a lot quicker.
Anonymous
April 16, 2005 5:25:43 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

nobody wrote:
> Thanks. Would this apply to the Epson 7600?
>
>
> On 15/4/05 9:21 pm, in article
> 1113596493.839243.108200@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com, "tomm101"
> <monego@valley.net> wrote:
>
> >
> > nobody wrote:
> >> What is RIP? Who needs it?
> >
> > RIPs are Raster Image Processors, they were originally designed to
take
> > the different parts of a page made in Quark, Pagemaker or Indesign
and
> > convert it to a printable form and control the printer (much more
than
> > just a driver). Over the years RIPs have evolved into highly
flexible
> > printer controlers. If you are doing a lot of large format printing
> > then you may need a RIP, but if you just want to use an Epson 4000
for
> > personnal use no. Photoshop, Epson and HP have made their software
so
> > well there may even be a question if you need a RIP at all.
> >
> > Tom
> >

Only if you are working with volume and are haveing problems working
without a RIP. I would only buy one with a printer now if the dealer
gave me a substantial discount on the RIP. Go on YAHOO groups Epson
Wide Format and ask.Most there were going from Photoshop. I work
through one Wasatch SoftRip to an Epson 9000. But I am using
nonstandard inks and papers, my profile make Monaco EZColor works with
this better than Photoshop. Any of the new Epsons I'd try without
first.

Tom
April 16, 2005 5:26:50 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Would you two fight a duel for me, so that I should know who is right and
who is wrong? :-)!! The only thing I have against the Epson 7600 is its
slowness.


On 16/4/05 11:06 am, in article d3qo39$flr$1@news8.svr.pol.co.uk,
"canongirly" <me@me.com> wrote:

>
> "rafe bustin" <rafeb@speakeasy.net> wrote in message
> news:iol0611fp522460b1fjle2evbi4il07j6e@4ax.com...
>>> "nobody" <nobody@nowhere.com.re> wrote in message
>>> news:BE85DDD4.3C82%nobody@nowhere.com.re...
>>>> Thank you. I understand that the Epson 7600 is excruciatingly slow, eg.
>>>> for
>>>> large prints. Would RIP make it print quicker?
>>>>
>>> Yes.
>>
>>
>> That's just not true.
>
> <snip>
>
>> But in all my
>> years hanging out on various Epson lists,
>> I've never heard it used in that context.
>> rafe b.
>
> So not from actual use then....which IS my experience and the RIP made it a
> hell of a lot quicker.
>
>
April 16, 2005 9:43:36 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Ken Weitzel" <kweitzel@shaw.ca> wrote in message
news:LsV7e.1028174$6l.927043@pd7tw2no...
>
>
> nobody wrote:
> > What is RIP? Who needs it?
>
>
> Remote Imaging Protocol.
>
> These days probably no one needs it.
>
> In the "olden" days of BBS's it was a way that graphics
> could be displayed over an ansi-like connection.
>

OP probably means Raster Image Processor. Google is your friend.
Anonymous
April 17, 2005 4:48:33 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

nobody <nobody@nowhere.com.re> wrote:
> Thank you. I understand that the Epson 7600 is excruciatingly slow,
> eg. for large prints.

It is not true.

Andrew.
!