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What's your default camera setting for everyday use?

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April 16, 2005 12:56:38 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

What's your default camera setting for everyday use? When you take
pictures spontaneously. How many megapixel? Normal, Fine, or
Superfine?
Anonymous
April 16, 2005 2:30:05 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <1113623798.099411.257280@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com>,
"Newbie" <chromallly@yahoo.com> wrote:

> What's your default camera setting for everyday use? When you take
> pictures spontaneously. How many megapixel? Normal, Fine, or
> Superfine?

I normally shoot at top resolution and the highest quality JPEG. I
almost always adjust the in-camera settings (contrast, WB, sharpness,
saturation, etc.) and shooting mode (P, Av, Tv, flash on/off) to match
conditions. The most difficult shooting conditions make me switch to
RAW mode so I have some extra bits of precision to work with during
post-processing.

It's not as tedious as it sounds. One setting is good many photos.
Most settings only need adjustment when changing rooms indoors or when
there's a significant change in the weather outdoors. The rest can be
left in automatic mode.
Anonymous
April 16, 2005 2:32:00 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Newbie" <chromallly@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1113623798.099411.257280@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
> What's your default camera setting for everyday use? When you take
> pictures spontaneously. How many megapixel? Normal, Fine, or
> Superfine?

You can always down-sample a large image file if you need to for some
reason...
....But there's no way you can create details missed as a result of low
resolution originals.
Related resources
Anonymous
April 16, 2005 11:20:50 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Newbie <chromallly@yahoo.com> wrote:
: What's your default camera setting for everyday use? When you take
: pictures spontaneously. How many megapixel? Normal, Fine, or
: Superfine?

I always leave my camera set on the highest resolution and quality seting
possible for all use. I personally do not use RAW mode as I am happy with
the results without the additional drivers needed to display RAW files on
my computer. A photo that is taken at a higher resolution than I need can
easily be reduced, but expanding a too low resolution photo only causes a
less than acceptable image.

As to other settings, for "on the go" or "snap" shots I leave all the
settings on Auto. If I am setting up a photo and have time to tinker a
bit, I can always alter the settings to get the best photo(s) possible.
But in fast changing situations/suprize situations, full auto works fine.
For example, walking in the park and seeing a squirrel standing up to
(apparently) watch a baseball game, taking time to tinker with settings
will likely mean the opportunity will disappear. But if I am setting up to
get a photo of a building, it isn't likely to move away if I take a few
min to adjust settings. Sometimes I use the Auto position to see what
settings the camera recommends, and then make adjustments from there. Of
course some situations require specific adjustments and this precludes any
auto settings. An example of this is that I want a photo of a statue but
there are lots of pedestrians walking infront of it. Adjusting for an
extreemly long exposure (1 min or more) will cause the pedestrians to blur
out and disappear. :)  No Auto function will ever fit that desire. :) 

Randy

==========
Randy Berbaum
Champaign, IL
Anonymous
April 16, 2005 1:19:25 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Newbie wrote:
> What's your default camera setting for everyday use? When you take
> pictures spontaneously. How many megapixel? Normal, Fine, or
> Superfine?
>
I keep mine on highest res, but save in JPEG. It is easy to switch to
TIFF for those special shots. My old Oly does not provide RAW, only
TIFF. I keep it on highest JPEG quality (least compression).
Anonymous
April 16, 2005 2:32:20 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Manual everything, exposure, focus, white balance, and raw file. That's it.

John D

"Newbie" <chromallly@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1113623798.099411.257280@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
> What's your default camera setting for everyday use? When you take
> pictures spontaneously. How many megapixel? Normal, Fine, or
> Superfine?
>
April 16, 2005 4:05:39 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Raw & Av mode, always

Canon 10D

eric
Anonymous
April 16, 2005 5:58:14 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Newbie" <chromallly@yahoo.com> writes:

> What's your default camera setting for everyday use? When you take
> pictures spontaneously. How many megapixel? Normal, Fine, or
> Superfine?

6 megapixels, fine jpeg (the highest jpeg setting on mine). So just
one step short of raw. About 2 megabytes per photo.

I try to convince myself to go down to "normal" jpeg for snapshots,
but I continue to have a hard time doing so. For all the uses I make
of the snapshots, that's really quite adequate. But what if I
happened to catch something really special while I was snapshooting?

--
David Dyer-Bennet, <mailto:D d-b@dd-b.net>, <http://www.dd-b.net/dd-b/&gt;
RKBA: <http://noguns-nomoney.com/&gt; <http://www.dd-b.net/carry/&gt;
Pics: <http://dd-b.lighthunters.net/&gt; <http://www.dd-b.net/dd-b/SnapshotAlbum/&gt;
Dragaera/Steven Brust: <http://dragaera.info/&gt;
Anonymous
April 16, 2005 5:59:14 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

John A. Stovall <johnastovall@earthlink.net> writes:

> On 15 Apr 2005 20:56:38 -0700, "Newbie" <chromallly@yahoo.com> wrote:
>
>>What's your default camera setting for everyday use? When you take
>>pictures spontaneously. How many megapixel? Normal, Fine, or
>>Superfine?
>
> That ISO? I normally run the 20D with the 17-40L ISO 200, F8 and set
> the speed and shoot RAW.

Oh, yeah, ISO. For snapshooting, often 400, unless there's so much
light I actually *want* a lower ISO.
--
David Dyer-Bennet, <mailto:D d-b@dd-b.net>, <http://www.dd-b.net/dd-b/&gt;
RKBA: <http://noguns-nomoney.com/&gt; <http://www.dd-b.net/carry/&gt;
Pics: <http://dd-b.lighthunters.net/&gt; <http://www.dd-b.net/dd-b/SnapshotAlbum/&gt;
Dragaera/Steven Brust: <http://dragaera.info/&gt;
Anonymous
April 16, 2005 6:13:53 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On 15 Apr 2005 20:56:38 -0700, "Newbie" <chromallly@yahoo.com> wrote:

>What's your default camera setting for everyday use? When you take
>pictures spontaneously. How many megapixel? Normal, Fine, or
>Superfine?

That ISO? I normally run the 20D with the 17-40L ISO 200, F8 and set
the speed and shoot RAW.


******************************************************************

"The past is foreign country: they do things differently there."


_The Go-Between_
L.P. Hartley
1895 - 1972
Anonymous
April 16, 2005 6:32:47 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Sat, 16 Apr 2005 11:58:14 -0700, David Dyer-Bennet wrote
(in article <m2br8e35x5.fsf@gw.dd-b.net>):

> "Newbie" <chromallly@yahoo.com> writes:
>
>> What's your default camera setting for everyday use? When you take
>> pictures spontaneously. How many megapixel? Normal, Fine, or
>> Superfine?
>
> 6 megapixels, fine jpeg (the highest jpeg setting on mine). So just
> one step short of raw. About 2 megabytes per photo.
>
> I try to convince myself to go down to "normal" jpeg for snapshots,
> but I continue to have a hard time doing so. For all the uses I make
> of the snapshots, that's really quite adequate. But what if I
> happened to catch something really special while I was snapshooting?
>
>

I shoot RAW: Aperture Priority (with manual exposure compensation as
desired), ISO 400 is my preference because I usually shoot early morning or
late evening. Auto focus as a general rule, but manual for "special"
circumstances.

4992 X 3328 pixel resolution (16 MP). All adjustments/settings done in
Photoshop.

I don't usually take photos "spontaneously" or just carry the camera around
with me.

When I intend to take photos, I'm ONLY taking photos: I try to keep my camera
ready for the conditions and actively "hunt" for photo opportunities.
April 16, 2005 6:36:33 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Mostly Program mode - auto focus, auto WB, auto exposure, ISO 80.
Always the biggest image size (but non-interpolated) "superfine" Jpeg -
about 2-3 MB from my 5 Mpixel camera. If I can't get the pic right with
the Program mode, only then do I go to Shutter, Aperture or Manual,
depending on the issue.

I've experimented extensively with RAW and TIFF; TIFF is useful for
"art" shots and also shots I know I'll want to crop down later (ie. ran
out of optical zoom), but they take a long time to save, so I don't use
it routinely. For me, RAW processing is an enormous pain in the a**;
it's just not worth the time especially since the in-camera noise
reduction is significantly better than any I've found as a separate
program. I get, for the most part, perfectly satisisfactory results
straight from the camera; that's why I bought this model and not a
cheaper one.....

ECM
April 16, 2005 8:12:31 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Newbie" <chromallly@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1113623798.099411.257280@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
> What's your default camera setting for everyday use? When you take
> pictures spontaneously. How many megapixel? Normal, Fine, or
> Superfine?
>
I keep my D70 set on aperature priority and autofocus. I usually use normal
jpg. However, when I really want the best, I use RAW.
Jim
April 16, 2005 8:45:21 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Newbie" <chromallly@yahoo.com> wrote:

>What's your default camera setting for everyday use? When you take
>pictures spontaneously. How many megapixel? Normal, Fine, or
>Superfine?

Everyday use isn't everyday. A good part of the year is winter so
Auto doesn't work so well for me. Program shift with an EV correction
dialed in is okay. Scene selection with the winter setting is okay
outdoors.

I tend to use program shift the most often unless I am shooting a
series of pictures and may shift to Aperature priority to keep from
getting into F8 where my non changable lens is soft.

I guess what I am trying to say is you have to prepare for
spontaneous. I love to take pictures of wild turkeys so during
certain times of the year, I have a tele attachment screwed on, ISO
pre selected, some ev correction set in + exposure bracketing, ect.
If I get lucky, I have an initial setting that gives me something.

Sometimes the turkeys are in open, other times in the trees with a lot
of snow affecting metering.

If you are inside a house, your auto mode might not be agressive
enough to push the ISO up or faster ISO's might be too noisy. Push
the button half way and see if your camera is coming up with something
reasonable for exposure settings. The best time to get ready for
spontaneous is before you need to shoot.

In that case you may need to go to a mode where you can set ISO. You
didn't state what kind of camera you have. I am writing from the
perspective of a Sony V3 owner, not a dslr owner (some day, oh how I
crave one and a decent long lens)

Bottom line is that there isn't a default setting for everyday use in
many cases.

HTH,

Wes





--
Reply to:
Whiskey Echo Sierra Sierra AT Alpha Charlie Echo Golf Romeo Oscar Paul dot Charlie Charlie
Lycos address is a spam trap.
Anonymous
April 16, 2005 10:22:12 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Newbie" <chromallly@yahoo.com> wrote:

> What's your default camera setting for everyday use? When you take
> pictures spontaneously. How many megapixel? Normal, Fine, or
> Superfine?
>

Program mode, ISO 200, maximum resolution, maximum size, RAW. WB is a moot
point in RAW mode. Nikon D-70.
Anonymous
April 16, 2005 11:09:05 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On 15 Apr 2005 20:56:38 -0700, "Newbie" <chromallly@yahoo.com> wrote:

>What's your default camera setting for everyday use? When you take
>pictures spontaneously. How many megapixel? Normal, Fine, or
>Superfine?
MOstly with an ISO of 100, focus set at infinity, multi burst mode,
sort out the best later.
April 16, 2005 11:16:38 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

With a Canon SD200, at 3 megapixel superfine setting, it's 1.7
megabytes per shot. Don't you think that's a bit excessive for
spontaneous shots?
Anonymous
April 17, 2005 12:26:15 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

clutch@lycos.com wrote:
> "Newbie" <chromallly@yahoo.com> wrote:
>
>
>>What's your default camera setting for everyday use? When you take
>>pictures spontaneously. How many megapixel? Normal, Fine, or
>>Superfine?

Auto. Ok, I'm lazy. I KNOW how to shift the gears in a car, and use a
clutch, but I buy only automatics. I use 'landscape' setting a lot also
because there is no focus delay. Maximum resolution the camera can do,
and the lowest compression (best quality) offered. Remember, once you
throw away picture information, you can't get it back.

>
>
> Everyday use isn't everyday. A good part of the year is winter so
> Auto doesn't work so well for me. Program shift with an EV correction
> dialed in is okay. Scene selection with the winter setting is okay
> outdoors.
>
> I tend to use program shift the most often unless I am shooting a
> series of pictures and may shift to Aperature priority to keep from
> getting into F8 where my non changable lens is soft.
>
> I guess what I am trying to say is you have to prepare for
> spontaneous. I love to take pictures of wild turkeys so during
> certain times of the year, I have a tele attachment screwed on, ISO
> pre selected, some ev correction set in + exposure bracketing, ect.
> If I get lucky, I have an initial setting that gives me something.
>
> Sometimes the turkeys are in open, other times in the trees with a lot
> of snow affecting metering.
>
> If you are inside a house, your auto mode might not be agressive
> enough to push the ISO up or faster ISO's might be too noisy. Push
> the button half way and see if your camera is coming up with something
> reasonable for exposure settings. The best time to get ready for
> spontaneous is before you need to shoot.
>
> In that case you may need to go to a mode where you can set ISO. You
> didn't state what kind of camera you have. I am writing from the
> perspective of a Sony V3 owner, not a dslr owner (some day, oh how I
> crave one and a decent long lens)
>
> Bottom line is that there isn't a default setting for everyday use in
> many cases.
>
> HTH,
>
> Wes
>
>
>
>
>


--
Ron Hunter rphunter@charter.net
Anonymous
April 17, 2005 12:53:02 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Newbie" <chromallly@yahoo.com> writes:

> What's your default camera setting for everyday use? When you take
> pictures spontaneously. How many megapixel? Normal, Fine, or
> Superfine?

While I often times use auto, I will switch to aperture priority mode (if I
want to control depth of field for instance), shutter priority mode (if I want
to avoid camera shake on long lenses), or manual mode (typically for flash) as
the situation requires. I either shoot in JPEG with the least amount of
compression (superfine in your words), or JPEG + RAW if I think I'm going to
need the extra dynamic range (ie, photographing my black dogs). I try to keep
my camera set at ISO 100, I will use higher ISO's as needed, and I find I now
check the ISO when turning on the camera, to make sure I know what ISO it is
set at. Depending on which camera I have at hand, I may be shooting a 2
megapixel, a 4 megapixel, or a 5 megapixel camera.

Of course you need to have enough memory cards that you can take a few pictures
without worrying about running out.

--
Michael Meissner
email: mrmnews@the-meissners.org
http://www.the-meissners.org
Anonymous
April 17, 2005 12:53:03 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Newbie" <chromallly@yahoo.com> writes:

> What's your default camera setting for everyday use? When you take
> pictures spontaneously. How many megapixel? Normal, Fine, or
> Superfine?

This was a good question, very productive.

My preference is to generate files with the greatest opportunities: raw
if I've got it, biggest and best JPEG if not. And the lowest ISO number
available. "Default" means where I start, which usually lasts about five
seconds, until the first metering of the subject, and the necessary
changes. It seems easier to get the first guesstimate close after some
experience. At some point I will have learned what conditions produce
acceptable noise levels, and seldom go beyond them except in very
special cases, including any-picture-is-better-than-no-picture, and
I-like-the-way-noise-looks-sometimes.

If I'm stalking the wild (your preferred game here) with a telephoto
lens, I like to begin with Shutter Priority a step faster than the old
1-over-focal-length parameter, to assure or encourage sharp exposures.
As a matter of practice, I practice moving the time value up and down to
improve depth of field characteristics for differing circumstances.

If my target subjects or desired outcome require a wide-angle lens, I
usually start with Aperture Priority at a step or two below
diffraction-small openings, and practice moving the aperture in response
to light (speed) requirements.

Sometimes I just go Auto for an initial shot or two and work from there,
depending on what I see in the chimp phase.

Too often I lose track of what I've learned and practiced, and get to
start all over again. Thank goodness it's all digital, adjustable, fun,
and rewarding.


--
Frank ess
Anonymous
April 17, 2005 1:06:13 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Don Stauffer" <stauffer@usfamily.net> wrote in message
news:1113661175.c3abf7f3776a0caf2ef2ac4562646973@teranews...
> Newbie wrote:
>> What's your default camera setting for everyday use? When you take
>> pictures spontaneously. How many megapixel? Normal, Fine, or
>> Superfine?
>>
> I keep mine on highest res, but save in JPEG. It is easy to switch to
> TIFF for those special shots. My old Oly does not provide RAW, only TIFF.
> I keep it on highest JPEG quality (least compression).

Don, don't panic TIFF is fine, actually JPEG is fine for most cos you will
just be printing at 6x4 anyway.
Anonymous
April 17, 2005 1:18:34 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Newbie" <chromallly@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1113623798.099411.257280@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
> What's your default camera setting for everyday use? When you take
> pictures spontaneously. How many megapixel? Normal, Fine, or
> Superfine?

Well I would expect that would depend greatly on what camera you have and
the shooting conditions but in general I set my 300D to AV mode with the
aperture at 8. On a sunny day I'll set the ISO to 100 or 200. On an
overcast/dark day I'll go to 400. From there I adjust according to keep the
shutter speed up high enough to capture the subject mater.

WB and AF is set to auto and I shoot exlusively in RAW.

--

Rob

"I'm the only guy in NASCAR history that went across the line upside down
and still finish 4th."
Anonymous
April 17, 2005 1:20:11 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Sat, 16 Apr 2005 13:59:14 -0500, David Dyer-Bennet <dd-b@dd-b.net>
wrote:

>John A. Stovall <johnastovall@earthlink.net> writes:
>
>> On 15 Apr 2005 20:56:38 -0700, "Newbie" <chromallly@yahoo.com> wrote:
>>
>>>What's your default camera setting for everyday use? When you take
>>>pictures spontaneously. How many megapixel? Normal, Fine, or
>>>Superfine?
>>
>> That ISO? I normally run the 20D with the 17-40L ISO 200, F8 and set
>> the speed and shoot RAW.
>
>Oh, yeah, ISO. For snapshooting, often 400, unless there's so much
>light I actually *want* a lower ISO.

400 will make for a lot of noise depending on the sensor.


*********************************************************

"I have been a witness, and these pictures are
my testimony. The events I have recorded should
not be forgotten and must not be repeated."

-James Nachtwey-
http://www.jamesnachtwey.com/
Anonymous
April 17, 2005 2:06:53 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <1113623798.099411.257280@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com>,
chromallly@yahoo.com says...
> What's your default camera setting for everyday use? When you take
> pictures spontaneously. How many megapixel? Normal, Fine, or
> Superfine?
>
>

Kodak DX6490 - always at the highest MP. As someone else said you can
always downsample. Once with my older camera I was taking some pictures
that all I was going to do was email them so I used 640x480. The
following day there was a great sunrise and I shot a couple of pictures
only to find when I got home that I still had the camera set at 640x480.
From then on I only shoot at the highest setting and resize if needed.

As for the other settings, I ussually shoot in Program mode which allows
me to adjust EV on the fly. ISO is set to auto most of the time unless
I'm shooting a picture where there is low light and flash won't work for
the shot. Almost always use auto white balance.

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Anonymous
April 17, 2005 2:33:54 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

John A. Stovall <johnastovall@earthlink.net> writes:

> On Sat, 16 Apr 2005 13:59:14 -0500, David Dyer-Bennet <dd-b@dd-b.net>
> wrote:
>
>>John A. Stovall <johnastovall@earthlink.net> writes:
>>
>>> On 15 Apr 2005 20:56:38 -0700, "Newbie" <chromallly@yahoo.com> wrote:
>>>
>>>>What's your default camera setting for everyday use? When you take
>>>>pictures spontaneously. How many megapixel? Normal, Fine, or
>>>>Superfine?
>>>
>>> That ISO? I normally run the 20D with the 17-40L ISO 200, F8 and set
>>> the speed and shoot RAW.
>>
>>Oh, yeah, ISO. For snapshooting, often 400, unless there's so much
>>light I actually *want* a lower ISO.
>
> 400 will make for a lot of noise depending on the sensor.

Not on mine. Fuji S2.
--
David Dyer-Bennet, <mailto:D d-b@dd-b.net>, <http://www.dd-b.net/dd-b/&gt;
RKBA: <http://noguns-nomoney.com/&gt; <http://www.dd-b.net/carry/&gt;
Pics: <http://dd-b.lighthunters.net/&gt; <http://www.dd-b.net/dd-b/SnapshotAlbum/&gt;
Dragaera/Steven Brust: <http://dragaera.info/&gt;
Anonymous
April 17, 2005 2:50:44 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Newbie" <chromallly@yahoo.com> writes:
> With a Canon SD200, at 3 megapixel superfine setting, it's 1.7
> megabytes per shot. Don't you think that's a bit excessive for
> spontaneous shots?

I generally use the "fine" setting on my S100. I get more shots per
megabyte and the camera handles a little faster that way. The higher
setting is useful if you're planning to edit the picture. I haven't
been able to spot any significant difference just looking at the jpegs
directly on screen.

No matter what you do though, these little cameras are snapshot
cameras, and if you're after superfine quality, you have to use
something more serious. So the "fine" setting (for me anyway) has
been good enough for just about any purpose the superfine setting is
good for.
Anonymous
April 17, 2005 4:43:08 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Newbie wrote:
> With a Canon SD200, at 3 megapixel superfine setting, it's 1.7
> megabytes per shot. Don't you think that's a bit excessive for
> spontaneous shots?
>
NO. You can always throw away the data you don't need, but you can't
get it back once it is discarded.


--
Ron Hunter rphunter@charter.net
Anonymous
April 17, 2005 5:02:33 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In message <s90361p0heaq3sv3fh35l5g1pt07vm0tqb@4ax.com>,
John A. Stovall <johnastovall@earthlink.net> wrote:

>400 will make for a lot of noise depending on the sensor.

I would consider the 20D's noise at 400 irrelevant unless the image is
low-key or is under-exposed. 400 is the absolute lowest I use with a
300mm or greater lens.

--

<>>< ><<> ><<> <>>< ><<> <>>< <>>< ><<>
John P Sheehy <JPS@no.komm>
><<> <>>< <>>< ><<> <>>< ><<> ><<> <>><
Anonymous
April 17, 2005 6:37:43 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On 16 Apr 2005 19:16:38 -0700, "Newbie" <chromallly@yahoo.com> wrote:

>With a Canon SD200, at 3 megapixel superfine setting, it's 1.7
>megabytes per shot. Don't you think that's a bit excessive for
>spontaneous shots?

What does the size of a file have to do with "spontaneous shots". Just
buy some 4GB CF cards. What if one of those shots is "The Shot"
wouldn't you want it to be the best possible print?


*********************************************************

"I have been a witness, and these pictures are
my testimony. The events I have recorded should
not be forgotten and must not be repeated."

-James Nachtwey-
http://www.jamesnachtwey.com/
Anonymous
April 17, 2005 6:41:10 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Sun, 17 Apr 2005 01:02:33 GMT, JPS@no.komm wrote:

>In message <s90361p0heaq3sv3fh35l5g1pt07vm0tqb@4ax.com>,
>John A. Stovall <johnastovall@earthlink.net> wrote:
>
>>400 will make for a lot of noise depending on the sensor.
>
>I would consider the 20D's noise at 400 irrelevant unless the image is
>low-key or is under-exposed. 400 is the absolute lowest I use with a
>300mm or greater lens.

I know for my 20D that's the case but we don't know that
camera/sensor combination the questioner is using. I would be willing
to bet a large sum of money (enough for me to by a Canon 1DmkII with
your money) he doesn't have a 20D.


*********************************************************

"I have been a witness, and these pictures are
my testimony. The events I have recorded should
not be forgotten and must not be repeated."

-James Nachtwey-
http://www.jamesnachtwey.com/
Anonymous
April 17, 2005 6:41:11 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

John A. Stovall wrote:
> On Sun, 17 Apr 2005 01:02:33 GMT, JPS@no.komm wrote:
>
>
>>In message <s90361p0heaq3sv3fh35l5g1pt07vm0tqb@4ax.com>,
>>John A. Stovall <johnastovall@earthlink.net> wrote:
>>
>>
>>>400 will make for a lot of noise depending on the sensor.
>>
>>I would consider the 20D's noise at 400 irrelevant unless the image is
>>low-key or is under-exposed. 400 is the absolute lowest I use with a
>>300mm or greater lens.
>
>
> I know for my 20D that's the case but we don't know that
> camera/sensor combination the questioner is using. I would be willing
> to bet a large sum of money (enough for me to by a Canon 1DmkII with
> your money) he doesn't have a 20D.
>


Statistically, that would be a very good bet.


--
Ron Hunter rphunter@charter.net
Anonymous
April 17, 2005 7:13:06 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Mark?" <mjmorgan(lowest even number here)@cox..net> wrote:

>"Newbie" <chromallly@yahoo.com> wrote in message
>news:1113623798.099411.257280@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
>> What's your default camera setting for everyday use? When you take
>> pictures spontaneously. How many megapixel? Normal, Fine, or
>> Superfine?

>You can always down-sample a large image file if you need to for some
>reason...
>...But there's no way you can create details missed as a result of low
>resolution originals.

True. But I find that my default setting depends on what
day it is.

If I'm going to a museum I set up for RAW mode and and ISO of
800 or 1600 since there's no flash allowed. I've also got
my 50mm f/1.8 lens on the camera and the kit zoom in my
pocket (you never know.)

But when I'm off with my grandchildren I've got ISO 100 and
fully automatic set. And I'm not doing RAW mode. And I've
got the kit zoom on the camera.

Of course during the day I'll change settings if need be.
But especially with highly active children where I'm taking
many images (knowing many will not come out for one reason
or another) full automatic gives me more success than any
"creative" setting.

----- Paul J. Gans
Anonymous
April 17, 2005 7:13:07 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Paul J Gans wrote:
> "Mark?" <mjmorgan(lowest even number here)@cox..net> wrote:
>
>
>>"Newbie" <chromallly@yahoo.com> wrote in message
>>news:1113623798.099411.257280@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
>>
>>>What's your default camera setting for everyday use? When you take
>>>pictures spontaneously. How many megapixel? Normal, Fine, or
>>>Superfine?
>
>
>>You can always down-sample a large image file if you need to for some
>>reason...
>>...But there's no way you can create details missed as a result of low
>>resolution originals.
>
>
> True. But I find that my default setting depends on what
> day it is.
>
> If I'm going to a museum I set up for RAW mode and and ISO of
> 800 or 1600 since there's no flash allowed. I've also got
> my 50mm f/1.8 lens on the camera and the kit zoom in my
> pocket (you never know.)
>
> But when I'm off with my grandchildren I've got ISO 100 and
> fully automatic set. And I'm not doing RAW mode. And I've
> got the kit zoom on the camera.
>
> Of course during the day I'll change settings if need be.
> But especially with highly active children where I'm taking
> many images (knowing many will not come out for one reason
> or another) full automatic gives me more success than any
> "creative" setting.
>
> ----- Paul J. Gans

Children can certainly limit the opportunity to fiddle with settings.


--
Ron Hunter rphunter@charter.net
Anonymous
April 17, 2005 7:13:07 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Paul J Gans" <gans@panix.com> wrote in message
news:D 3sk82$s49$6@reader1.panix.com...
> "Mark?" <mjmorgan(lowest even number here)@cox..net> wrote:
>
>>"Newbie" <chromallly@yahoo.com> wrote in message
>>news:1113623798.099411.257280@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
>>> What's your default camera setting for everyday use? When you take
>>> pictures spontaneously. How many megapixel? Normal, Fine, or
>>> Superfine?
>
>>You can always down-sample a large image file if you need to for some
>>reason...
>>...But there's no way you can create details missed as a result of low
>>resolution originals.
>
> True. But I find that my default setting depends on what
> day it is.
>
> If I'm going to a museum I set up for RAW mode and and ISO of
> 800 or 1600 since there's no flash allowed. I've also got
> my 50mm f/1.8 lens on the camera and the kit zoom in my
> pocket (you never know.)
>
> But when I'm off with my grandchildren I've got ISO 100 and
> fully automatic set. And I'm not doing RAW mode. And I've
> got the kit zoom on the camera.
>
> Of course during the day I'll change settings if need be.
> But especially with highly active children where I'm taking
> many images (knowing many will not come out for one reason
> or another) full automatic gives me more success than any
> "creative" setting.

When I think of what settings I want my camera on when left in my bag (and
not actively shooting), I usually want is in Program mode--simply because
that is the state most appropriate for what I call the "panic shot." By
"panic shot," I mean those times when (for example) a plane is 3 seconds
from smashing into a building, and 2 of those seconds will be taken up
waiting for your camera to turn on. In situations like that...where I would
be in a mad rush to grab my camera and grab ANY shot possible in a split
second...I want to be safe assuming that I'll get at least a usable shot in
the event it is literally IMPOSSIBLE to fiddle with settings--no matter how
quick I may be. There is nothing worse than mising a split-second
opportunity shot simply because your previous shooting scene required
extreme exposures settings which were left that way when something
unexpected happens.
April 17, 2005 7:41:03 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Newbie wrote:

> What's your default camera setting for everyday use?

RAW, ISO 100, A priority, center weighted metering, AF+MF.

--

Stacey
Anonymous
April 17, 2005 3:18:29 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Paul Rubin wrote:
> "Newbie" <chromallly@yahoo.com> writes:
>
>>With a Canon SD200, at 3 megapixel superfine setting, it's 1.7
>>megabytes per shot. Don't you think that's a bit excessive for
>>spontaneous shots?
>
>
> I generally use the "fine" setting on my S100. I get more shots per
> megabyte and the camera handles a little faster that way. The higher
> setting is useful if you're planning to edit the picture. I haven't
> been able to spot any significant difference just looking at the jpegs
> directly on screen.
>
> No matter what you do though, these little cameras are snapshot
> cameras, and if you're after superfine quality, you have to use
> something more serious. So the "fine" setting (for me anyway) has
> been good enough for just about any purpose the superfine setting is
> good for.

If you have a 256 meg card, 1.7 meg/picture gives you about 150
pictures. I don't see that as excessive. Keep as much data as you can,
and toss the excess later, when you can better evaluate the image.


--
Ron Hunter rphunter@charter.net
April 17, 2005 4:17:44 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On 15 Apr 2005 20:56:38 -0700, "Newbie" <chromallly@yahoo.com> wrote:

>What's your default camera setting for everyday use? When you take
>pictures spontaneously. How many megapixel? Normal, Fine, or
>Superfine?

Highest res and Auto everything.

That way you can grab the camera and shoot straight away if needed.
Anonymous
April 17, 2005 5:12:14 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In message <a0j361ttnba0pkk51kc3m58r3srtkf8olh@4ax.com>,
John A. Stovall <johnastovall@earthlink.net> wrote:

> I know for my 20D that's the case but we don't know that
>camera/sensor combination the questioner is using. I would be willing
>to bet a large sum of money (enough for me to by a Canon 1DmkII with
>your money) he doesn't have a 20D.

Sometimes I wish my newsreader had the capability of showing a
different, low-contrast background of my choosing for each newsgroup.
I'd put one here with a scanner, a P&S, and a DSLR.
--

<>>< ><<> ><<> <>>< ><<> <>>< <>>< ><<>
John P Sheehy <JPS@no.komm>
><<> <>>< <>>< ><<> <>>< ><<> ><<> <>><
Anonymous
April 17, 2005 5:23:31 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In message <a0j361ttnba0pkk51kc3m58r3srtkf8olh@4ax.com>,
John A. Stovall <johnastovall@earthlink.net> wrote:

>On Sun, 17 Apr 2005 01:02:33 GMT, JPS@no.komm wrote:

>>In message <s90361p0heaq3sv3fh35l5g1pt07vm0tqb@4ax.com>,
>>John A. Stovall <johnastovall@earthlink.net> wrote:

>>>400 will make for a lot of noise depending on the sensor.

>>I would consider the 20D's noise at 400 irrelevant unless the image is
>>low-key or is under-exposed. 400 is the absolute lowest I use with a
>>300mm or greater lens.

> I know for my 20D that's the case but we don't know that
>camera/sensor combination the questioner is using. I would be willing
>to bet a large sum of money (enough for me to by a Canon 1DmkII with
>your money) he doesn't have a 20D.

That's one of the big problems with the ISO standards (or lack thereof)
for digitals. The numbers are a bit arbitrary. Some cameras are
accurate, as far as metering a grey, contiguous surface; some are not.
They vary much more than film does at a given ISO, as far as noise is
concerned. If you shoot in RAW at ISO 100 with many digitals, you have
a lot more headroom than you do with, say, slide film, so the ISO 100
mode of the camera with +1 EC compensation may actually be like an EI of
50 with slide film. My 10D says "100" and meters for "64" (I actually
like that as a default for RAW; however, it tends to blow out JPEGs,
especially with the 10D's shoulder-less JPEG tone curve).
--

<>>< ><<> ><<> <>>< ><<> <>>< <>>< ><<>
John P Sheehy <JPS@no.komm>
><<> <>>< <>>< ><<> <>>< ><<> ><<> <>><
April 17, 2005 11:26:41 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Newbie wrote:

> What's your default camera setting for everyday use? When you take
> pictures spontaneously. How many megapixel? Normal, Fine, or
> Superfine?


Heh, I keep trying new things... I think I use Aperture priority most
often and remember to keep an eye on the speed. It's rare that I need a
special motion blur effect but DOF is always a consideration.

I decided I don't like auto-ISO, it's too subtle of a surprise when I
don't want it because it doesn't appear on the screens with the D70 till
after it's shot. I don't hesitate to bump up the ISO to maybe 640 for
big gains in low light, closeups, etc.

Manual mode is really not that bad. Start in aperture to get a ballpark
speed recommendation but then maybe you want something specific and at
that point, it's easier to just look at the meter reading while
twiddling settings than it is to go into exposure compensation. On my
previous P&S the only thing I ever adjusted was exposure compensation
and everything else was green mode and while I was ignorant, I got good
shots. It was a simple world and that left me free from worry and able
to concentrate on the proper exposure using one consideration and able
to think about composition mostly. I worked fast and free. Anyways I
figure it's worth learning the rest. Once I've got manual mode down to
where it's automatic in my head and fingers, I'll be miles ahead. Not
yet though, I struggle & forget things and make mistakes.

My old P&S required going into the screen menus to set things manually,
the D70 has enough dials & buttons to do all that while looking through
the viewfinder (with enough practice).

Definitely the largest best quality unless I'm running out of memory
unless I'm just documenting a basement or doing time lapse movie
capture. I've begun shooting raw plus jpeg and it's nice to have the
quick previews for selecting from multiple experimental shots. In that
case, I do delete awful ones then move the jpegs into the raw folder &
delete the missing raw files. It's a hassle but better than converting
all the raw files. After sorting, I'll go through & make any tweaks on
the raw conversion, batch the whole thing to 90% jpeg quality & keep the
raws in a subfolder to be moved off my working drive. The camera jpegs
get dumped after serving their purpose for review and selection.
Anonymous
April 18, 2005 12:30:26 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <1113623798.099411.257280@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com>,
Newbie <chromallly@yahoo.com> wrote:
>What's your default camera setting for everyday use? When you take
>pictures spontaneously. How many megapixel? Normal, Fine, or
>Superfine?

Av, 100 ISO, raw.
April 18, 2005 5:53:21 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Newbie" <chromallly@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1113623798.099411.257280@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
> What's your default camera setting for everyday use? When you take
> pictures spontaneously. How many megapixel? Normal, Fine, or
> Superfine?
>

Hello all,

Can you tell me why so many of you shoot in Av mode? I understand how it's
used to change the DOF and in my case, reduce purple-fringing. Is there
another reason why you regularly shoot in that mode?

TIA

Renee
Anonymous
April 18, 2005 7:44:20 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In message <lqE8e.5789$_t3.4226@tornado.tampabay.rr.com>,
"Renee" <rr@invalid.org> wrote:

>Can you tell me why so many of you shoot in Av mode? I understand how it's
>used to change the DOF and in my case, reduce purple-fringing.

I don't see how Av mode could reduce purple fringing. Do you mean
chromatic aberration?
--

<>>< ><<> ><<> <>>< ><<> <>>< <>>< ><<>
John P Sheehy <JPS@no.komm>
><<> <>>< <>>< ><<> <>>< ><<> ><<> <>><
April 18, 2005 8:20:14 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

<JPS@no.komm> wrote in message
news:i3b661d9q2ir0c14qq4rvkur4rs196f9mu@4ax.com...
> In message <lqE8e.5789$_t3.4226@tornado.tampabay.rr.com>,
> "Renee" <rr@invalid.org> wrote:
>
>>Can you tell me why so many of you shoot in Av mode? I understand how it's
>>used to change the DOF and in my case, reduce purple-fringing.
>
> I don't see how Av mode could reduce purple fringing. Do you mean
> chromatic aberration?
> --
>
> <>>< ><<> ><<> <>>< ><<> <>>< <>>< ><<>
> John P Sheehy <JPS@no.komm>
> ><<> <>>< <>>< ><<> <>>< ><<> ><<> <>><

John,

I was told and have seen the difference in photos where one had
purple-fringing around treetops and the other didn't. Closing the aperture
by one or two values (or closing it altogether) had reduced the
purple-fringing considerably.

It's my understanding that purple-fringing is a type of chromatic
aberration. I guess the fringing could be more on the blue or red side, too.
But I'd still be calling it purple-fringing if I saw it there.

I wouldn't expect night-time shots with colored (bleeding) halos around
bright colorful lights to be called purple-fringing. In that case, I'd call
it chromatic aberration.

What part have I missed?

Renee
Anonymous
April 18, 2005 2:30:14 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <lqE8e.5789$_t3.4226@tornado.tampabay.rr.com>,
Renee <rr@invalid.org> wrote:
>
>Can you tell me why so many of you shoot in Av mode?

Because we're too lazy to use M all the time. ;-)

Seriously though, for me, it's becausefor the bulk of the images I take, I
want to ensure that I'm going to have the depth of field that I want. For
any given session, the type of photos I'm taking will be similar (landscape,
portraits, etc.), so DoF won't want to vary too much between photos. The
question is then down to whether I want to use Av or M. If the light isn't
changing a lot, and I'm after a perceptual rendition, or if I have a lot of
time to set my shot up, then I'll set my exposure in M and leave it there.
If I want the camera to be able to adjust quickly to local lighting
conditions, or am photographing something that might be fleeting in nature,
then I'll use Av.

Very occasionally, I'll use Tv mode, but that's rare with the style of
photography I like.
April 18, 2005 2:30:15 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <83ecj2-8cj.ln1@narcissus.dyndns.org>,
cpbrown@ntlworld.no_uce_please.com says...
> In article <lqE8e.5789$_t3.4226@tornado.tampabay.rr.com>,
> Renee <rr@invalid.org> wrote:
> >
> >Can you tell me why so many of you shoot in Av mode?
>
> Because we're too lazy to use M all the time. ;-)
>
> Seriously though, for me, it's becausefor the bulk of the images I take, I
> want to ensure that I'm going to have the depth of field that I want. For
> any given session, the type of photos I'm taking will be similar (landscape,
> portraits, etc.), so DoF won't want to vary too much between photos. The
> question is then down to whether I want to use Av or M. If the light isn't
> changing a lot, and I'm after a perceptual rendition, or if I have a lot of
> time to set my shot up, then I'll set my exposure in M and leave it there.
> If I want the camera to be able to adjust quickly to local lighting
> conditions, or am photographing something that might be fleeting in nature,
> then I'll use Av.
>
> Very occasionally, I'll use Tv mode, but that's rare with the style of
> photography I like.
>

Jumping into the thread late I know, but I thought I'de try to contribute.

First, and foremost for me, the settings I use will depend on what camera I
am using.

Sony F-828:

Shutter priority mode is what I usually, but not allways use on this camera.
The DOF is usually pretty deep down to about f4, and for most of what I
shoot, I want to be able to "freeze" the action, so I use the fastest shutter
speed I have enough light for, and stay at ISO 64 or ISO 100. (the camera is
FAR too noisey at higher ISO)

Canon 300D:

Since I use it mostly for posed photos (so far) with external flash (both on
a bracket on the camera, and external) it is most lilely to be used in manual
(including focus) at about 60 to 80mm equivalent, and set differently for
each shot.

Fuji S7000:

Shutter priority. I only use this camera in a horse show ring, and mostly
only for photographing horses doing whats reffered to as "The Long Trot".

When shooting "The long trot" its important to capture the horse just as he
reaches full extension of all four legs, and 160 is fast enough, so I focus
manually on a spot directly in front of me and wait till the horse steps into
that spot. I use a Sunpak 383 set Manual, full power, ISO 200 (the lowest
the camera has) and at shutter speed 160 if I press the shutter button just
as the "lead leg (inside foreleg) passes the halfway point coming forward,
the camera will capture the image just as the inside front foot is touching
down.


--
Larry Lynch
Mystic, Ct.
Anonymous
April 19, 2005 1:12:40 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In message <2AG8e.4739$716.1391@tornado.tampabay.rr.com>,
"Renee" <rr@invalid.org> wrote:

>I was told and have seen the difference in photos where one had
>purple-fringing around treetops and the other didn't. Closing the aperture
>by one or two values (or closing it altogether) had reduced the
>purple-fringing considerably.
>
>It's my understanding that purple-fringing is a type of chromatic
>aberration. I guess the fringing could be more on the blue or red side, too.
>But I'd still be calling it purple-fringing if I saw it there.
>
>I wouldn't expect night-time shots with colored (bleeding) halos around
>bright colorful lights to be called purple-fringing. In that case, I'd call
>it chromatic aberration.
>
>What part have I missed?

It seems to me that the term "Chromatic aberration" refers to optical
issues, and "blooming" is a sensor/demosaicing issue. Purple fringing
became a popular term at one time to refer to "blooming", and then
afterwards, people started using PF to refer to CA, but CA is not just
purple fringing; if you had a black-and white bull's eye target and all
the edges came out purple, that would be blooming or purple fringing.
If the inside edge of the whites were one color, and the outside edges,
another, then that would be chromatic aberration.
--

<>>< ><<> ><<> <>>< ><<> <>>< <>>< ><<>
John P Sheehy <JPS@no.komm>
><<> <>>< <>>< ><<> <>>< ><<> ><<> <>><
!