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Lens Filter Protection

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Anonymous
April 18, 2005 1:13:22 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Having just bought a new Nikon D70 i want to buy a filter to protect the
lens what is the best one to get as it will be on the lens all the time it,s
67mm thread thankyou.Can someone recommend a good web site with tips etc.for
this camera.

More about : lens filter protection

Anonymous
April 18, 2005 1:13:23 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Stephen Manaton" <meade@tivvy.freeserve.co.uk> writes:

> Having just bought a new Nikon D70 i want to buy a filter to protect the
> lens what is the best one to get as it will be on the lens all the time it,s
> 67mm thread thankyou.Can someone recommend a good web site with tips etc.for
> this camera.

Go to http://www.2filter.com. I see a lot of people liking B+W MRC coated UV
filters, and others liking Hoya Pro filters.

--
Michael Meissner
email: mrmnews@the-meissners.org
http://www.the-meissners.org
Anonymous
April 18, 2005 1:13:23 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <d3ug0r$daj$1@news7.svr.pol.co.uk>,
"Stephen Manaton" <meade@tivvy.freeserve.co.uk> wrote:

> Having just bought a new Nikon D70 i want to buy a filter to protect the
> lens what is the best one to get as it will be on the lens all the time it,s
> 67mm thread thankyou.Can someone recommend a good web site with tips etc.for
> this camera.

Heliopan UV SH-PMC which also happens to be a slim filter with front
threads so your lens cap will still fit and it will also minimize
vignetting being a slim style.

--
To reply no_ HPMarketing Corp.
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Anonymous
April 18, 2005 3:08:03 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Stephen Manaton" <meade@tivvy.freeserve.co.uk> wrote in message
news:D 3ug0r$daj$1@news7.svr.pol.co.uk...
> Having just bought a new Nikon D70 i want to buy a filter to protect the
> lens what is the best one to get as it will be on the lens all the time
it,s
> 67mm thread thankyou.Can someone recommend a good web site with tips
etc.for
> this camera.

One note of caution. A good standard filter (Hoya, Tiffen, etc) will work
fine, but you cannot stack filters on that lens. If you're going to use a
polarizer, you'll need to take the UV off. With standard thickness filters,
inside of 22mm or so the corners go *DARK*. I've heard the thin filters will
minimize this, but haven't tried them.
Anonymous
April 18, 2005 3:58:45 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Skylight, Haze and UV filters are much the same. They both block UV
light. You can't see UV light, but most films can. Those films see it as
blue or blue grey. There is no rule as to exactly what a UV or Skylight
filter is so different manufacturers often have different ideas. They
differ in exactly where they cut off the light and how smoothly they cut off
the light. Different films react differently so that complicates things
even more.

You can say in general that Skylight filters are a little stronger and
often will "warm" the colors because they generally cut off a little of the
blue light. Some manufacturers offer a number of different such filters of
different ?strengths? (higher of lower cut off points). The best part of
this is they all do about the same thing and they generally do their thing
best when needed most. That is if there is a lot of UV light they get ride
of it and if there is little, they don't do much.

In short, for the most part it does not make much difference in real life.

Most people don't buy, or should I say, most people are sold UV filters not
to correct light problems, but to "Protect Your Expensive Lens." Keep in
mind that for many years the guy behind the counter (I was one of them) may
have made more on the filter, than he made on the lens! His incentive was
to make money and sell you something. Fear of damage is a good sales tool.
Sort of like the paint protection package they will offer you on a new car.

In real life, with a few exceptions like a windy sandy beach or a
photographer who over-cleans his lenses, few photographers need the
protection of a filter. But then again, even a good one does not cost all
that much* and they are easy to use. The down side is they will very
slightly reduce sharpness and very slightly increase flare. It is a wash,
little gain and little loss.

Most of the time you would get better protection with a good lens shade and
it would be likely to reduce flare, but they are more difficult to use.

So if you want one and if you like warmer colored photos get a skylight, if
you like less warm photos go for a UV or Haze.

* On of the tricks of selling add ones like filters is to have the price low
enough that the buyer will say, even if it does not work I did not speed
that much on it. Which is why you will not often find the sales person
trying to sell you a B&W brand filter that is going to cost a few additional
$$$ but cause less image problems.

Given the real protection offered (on a small percentage of lenses will
suffer any damage to a lens preventable by a UV filter and the fact that the
UV filter is not free, especially if you buy a good one (a good UV for a
typical wide angle lens can cost of the $100 US range a lot more difference
than the $10 you suggest) the value factor is likely to be negative. In
addition the lose of optical ability of a lens which does suffer damage that
might have been prevented by a UV filter is generally very small.

What may well be worth the cost to most photographers is the feeling of
security, which is one of the real values of any insurance.

My training is in economics and accounting and I tend to go overboard on
the measurable facts. I also see that many people don't understand or
properly measure those economic facts.


Please note that this author is not the same Joseph Meehan who is a
professional author of Photograph materials.

--
Joseph Meehan

Dia's Muire duit
"Stephen Manaton" <meade@tivvy.freeserve.co.uk> wrote in message
news:D 3ug0r$daj$1@news7.svr.pol.co.uk...
> Having just bought a new Nikon D70 i want to buy a filter to protect the
> lens what is the best one to get as it will be on the lens all the time
> it,s
> 67mm thread thankyou.Can someone recommend a good web site with tips
> etc.for
> this camera.
>
>
Anonymous
April 18, 2005 3:58:46 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Joseph Meehan <sligojoe_Spamno@hotmail.com> wrote:

[..]
> So if you want one and if you like warmer colored photos get a skylight,
> if you like less warm photos go for a UV or Haze.

Note that Skylight filters will confuse your camera's auto white
balance. The camera will correct against the filter, negating it.
Anonymous
April 18, 2005 3:30:22 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Paul Mitchum wrote:
> Joseph Meehan <sligojoe_Spamno@hotmail.com> wrote:
>
> [..]
>> So if you want one and if you like warmer colored photos get a
>> skylight, if you like less warm photos go for a UV or Haze.
>
> Note that Skylight filters will confuse your camera's auto white
> balance. The camera will correct against the filter, negating it.

Yea, I really need to revamp my standard response for digital specific
issues. :-)

--
Joseph Meehan

Dia's Muire duit
Anonymous
April 18, 2005 10:19:31 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <iTM8e.6740$0d6.736@tornado.ohiordc.rr.com>,
sligojoe_Spamno@hotmail.com says...
> Paul Mitchum wrote:
> > Joseph Meehan <sligojoe_Spamno@hotmail.com> wrote:
> >
> > [..]
> >> So if you want one and if you like warmer colored photos get a
> >> skylight, if you like less warm photos go for a UV or Haze.
> >
> > Note that Skylight filters will confuse your camera's auto white
> > balance. The camera will correct against the filter, negating it.
>
> Yea, I really need to revamp my standard response for digital specific
> issues. :-)
>
>

"Just Say No" to auto white balance.

White balance is about balancing for the light you're shooting in.
Auto white balance can only read the color balance of the image
you've just shot. Any strongly colored image will confuse auto
white balance.

"Just Say No."

Diane
!