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Delete dual OS on same partition

Last response: in Windows 7
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January 8, 2010 2:05:22 AM

Hey everyone i've run intro a problem. I recently installed XP onto a partition with Windows 7 already on it and i've read that it's bad to do, so I made another partition and installed XP onto and now i've got 2 partitions which are both XP and I can't get into my 7 :(  . Right now I have a C:\ and E:\ (XP and 7 are on C:\ and XP itself is on E:\). So my question is can I revert C:\ back to 7 without having to format? I still have to Windows folders, 1 names Windows and the other named windows.old. Help!

More about : delete dual partition

a b $ Windows 7
January 8, 2010 5:26:24 AM

Oops.. Sounds like a proper stuff-up. I'm not sure if you can do anything, to be honest. Maybe deleting the XP partition on C: and then booting from the Windows 7 disc to fix the boot loader will do the trick.
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January 8, 2010 6:01:40 AM

okay thanks i will try that
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a b $ Windows 7
January 8, 2010 1:06:28 PM

You need to install XP first, then 7 to do this correctly. And no, you cannot install them both onto the same partition. When you do the 7 install, you will create a new partition, install there, and install the boot loader so you can choose which OS you wish to boot with. (7 will present you with the options when you do the install, just choose how you want to do it)
Go here, some pretty good instructions:
http://apcmag.com/the_definitive_dualbooting_guide_linu...
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a b $ Windows 7
January 8, 2010 9:10:08 PM

Enzed20,

You cannot have multiple operating systems on the same exact partition. If you installed XP on to the same partition that Windows 7 was first installed and you wish to revert back to Windows 7 you will need to perform a clean install.

Please note that when migrating from Windows XP to Windows 7 you will not have an "in place upgrade" option. You will however have the option to select "custom" install when prompted. The Windows 7 install process will then copy all of your data in "My Documents" over to a Windows.old folder within Windows 7 itself. All applications and documents stored in other locations will have to be reinstalled / transferred manually.
For more information on the Windows 7 Upgrade, please go here: http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows7/Installing-...
For additional assistance with the migration of Windows XP to Windows 7, please go here: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/ee150430.asp...

Jessica
Microsoft Windows Client Team
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a b $ Windows 7
January 9, 2010 6:17:43 PM

When you have two OS's, even on separate partitions, the boot files for both reside on the same partition which is why having two OS's on the same HD is less than ideal. Over the years, I have seen many setups:

Workable - 1st OS say Win9x on C:\Windows and 2nd OS on C:\WinNT. Not only did this eliminate the possibility of using NTFS but left both OS's exposed to failure. Little Johnny coming home from school to play his game could easily mess up Dad's system.

Better - Using a 3 party boot manager like Powerquest's Partition Magic, you would create two separate C:\ Partitions. Booting to one locked and hid the other meaning little Johnny couldn't mess with dad's stuff at all.

Workable - You put WinXP on C:\ and then add Win7 on D:\ at first glance your OS's are separate but no real protection is provided. Booting to XP, any virus or other problem can affect the D:\ partition.....corrupted boot files prevent access to both OS's.

Better - Use a 3rd party boot manager to hide and lock the 2nd OS from access while booted to the 1st. Or, put each OS on a separate HD, installing each while the other HD is unplugged. Switch between OS's via the BIOS boot priority.

At this point in time, it's the 1st time in 20 years I don't have multiple OS's installed. Win 7's "XP mode" has made it redundant for me.
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