How do you paint a pc case?

i kind of want to turn my HAF 912 into this glossy white kind of looking thing. Like the nzxt Phantom, is there a guide on how to paint pc cases? Or do you just spray the thing down with spray paint. Can I use somethign like this? http://www.michaels.com/Krylon%C2%AE-Indoor-Outdoor-Primer/cp0423,default,pd.html?start=7&cgid=products-craftpainting-paint-spraypaint&srule=Rating%20and%20Review%20%28Hi%20to%20Low%29
Reply to amuffin
30 answers Last reply
More about paint case
  1. www.mnpctech.com/case-mod-paint-computer-pc-case-mod-how-to1.html
    Reply to unksol
  2. +1 to unksol on that link, looks great!

    1) be sure that the paint you buy is good at adhearing to the materials you are spraying them on. You may need seperate paints for the plastic and the metal, which can lead to some color issues, but better to have a slightly off color than to find that your paint is chipping off a few months later

    2) Paint is all about surface prep. When you think you are done with prep, then do it all again. The smallest problems in this stage can bring a world of hurt (bubling paint, rejected spots/fisheye, chipping, flaking, rub-off etc.)

    3) You get what you pay for. Cheap paint is cheap for a reason. With a nice case that should last a really really long time I would not cheap out on the paint used.

    Enjoy!
    Reply to CaedenV
  3. I thought those pics weren't that impressive though I too fell in love with them at first sight Muffin... What Up????
    My suggestion is don't do it.....
    You'll spoil a perfectly amazing looking case.....
    I think we both ought to buy one of those White Phantoms a little later this year.....
    You can check the Level 10GT.... White option and it really has spoiled the whole look of the Black one....


    It is the Smooth shape of the Phantom that gives it the amazing look in white.... the HAFs aren't exactly Smooth :)

    http://forum.coolermaster.com/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=14498
    Reply to alyoshka
  4. The mnpc link will show ya everything you need to know . The prep work is at least as important as the actual application ie. sanding , cleaning , priming and as caedenv noted plastic and metal may require seperate prep techniques and or products . The good news is you can do it with rattle cans ( spray paints ) and a self etching primer like 3m . Good luck with the project !
    Reply to rufus_22
  5. alyoshka said:
    I thought those pics weren't that impressive though I too fell in love with them at first sight Muffin... What Up????
    My suggestion is don't do it.....
    You'll spoil a perfectly amazing looking case.....
    I think we both ought to buy one of those White Phantoms a little later this year.....
    You can check the Level 10GT.... White option and it really has spoiled the whole look of the Black one....
    http://www.mnpctech.3dpixelnet.com/picture_library/coolermaster_haf_912_midtower_case_review5.jpghttp://www.mnpctech.3dpixelnet.com/picture_library/coolermaster_haf_912_midtower_case_review6.jpg

    It is the Smooth shape of the Phantom that gives it the amazing look in white.... the HAFs aren't exactly Smooth :)

    http://forum.coolermaster.com/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=14498

    I would get a phantom and mod my 912 but my mom is going to be asking my why I am getting a new case because I have only had the haf 912 for 6 months and then my dad doesn't let me use the dremel :/ Afraid I am going to hurt myself. Do you know how much one can sell used cases?
    Reply to amuffin
  6. unksol said:
    www.mnpctech.com/case-mod-paint-computer-pc-case-mod-how-to1.html

    Can i use regular sand paper and do it by hand? Or do I have to get one of those...
    Reply to amuffin
  7. You can do it by hand, but it will take a bit of time and a lot of patience.

    You only need etching primer if you're applying paint to bare metal. If you're applying to plastic or painted metal, any aerosol primer will work fine.

    I recommend using 320 or 400grit sandpaper to prep the metal surfaces of the case, followed by "scotchbrite". Use mild soap mixed with distilled water to clean the surface prior to applying the primer. Be sure to allow time to completely dry before applying primer. After application, allow the primer to dry fully. I usually recommend letting the primed panels sit for 8-10hrs. You should apply at least 2 coats of primer....3 tops. After the primer is completely dry, scuff with "scotchbrite" and wipe with mild soap and distilled water....allow to completely dry before applying paint.

    Follow the directions on any aerosol cans. Use in well ventilated area, wear appropriate safety items, etc... The paint fumes are toxic, as can be paint dust.
    Reply to sykozis
  8. amuffin said:
    Can i use regular sand paper and do it by hand? Or do I have to get one of those...


    I have never (and to be honest would never) paint a case. Its a good bit of work and just not worth it to me. But I know that's the go to tutorial. So that's all I can speak to for cases. As for sanding, you can always do it by hand. just need a little technique, time, and some muscle. They sell that same shape sanders in a non electric version. Just holds the paper but should be cheap and you'll need something to apply even pressure.

    Not to be overly personal, but from working on cars/houses with my dad etc, if I were you i would try and rope him into a father/son project. After all if he doesn't want you to hurt yourself with the tools ought to get him to teach you to use them right :) my three cents
    Reply to unksol
  9. unksol said:
    I have never (and to be honest would never) paint a case. Its a good bit of work and just not worth it to me. But I know that's the go to tutorial. So that's all I can speak to for cases. As for sanding, you can always do it by hand. just need a little technique, time, and some muscle. They sell that same shape sanders in a non electric version. Just holds the paper but should be cheap and you'll need something to apply even pressure.

    Not to be overly personal, but from working on cars/houses with my dad etc, if I were you i would try and rope him into a father/son project. After all if he doesn't want you to hurt yourself with the tools ought to get him to teach you to use them right :) my three cents


    You don't want to apply pressure at all. Applying pressure while sanding can result in damage to the surface being sanded.
    Reply to sykozis
  10. sykozis said:
    You don't want to apply pressure at all. Applying pressure while sanding can result in damage to the surface being sanded.


    I suppose "pressure" could be argued to be the wrong word in some cases, but you are always applying pressure even if its just the weight of the tool, or nothing's going to happen. saying you would apply none is kinda rediculous. in anycase the point was to sand evenly, which a tool will help with, vs just going at it with a piece of sand paper (by hand) which will be uneven. I do appreciate the smartasssry though
    Reply to unksol
  11. unksol said:
    I suppose "pressure" could be argued to be the wrong word in some cases, but you are always applying pressure even if its just the weight of the tool, or nothing's going to happen. saying you would apply none is kinda rediculous. in anycase the point was to sand evenly, which a tool will help with, vs just going at it with a piece of sand paper (by hand) which will be uneven. I do appreciate the smartasssry though


    I guess I should have been a bit clearer. Sanding by hand (holding the sand paper with your hand) does sand unevenly, you're right. Using a manual sander or powered sander is prefered. The idea though, is not to apply any pressure yourself. The weight of the sander should be sufficient...if you get a good quality manual sander anyway. Basically, avoid using a cheap sanding sponge.

    I actually use one of these at work: http://www.amazon.com/Eagle-00202-Super-Tack-Foam-Block/dp/B001GDVHEI/ref=sr_1_334?s=power-hand-tools&ie=UTF8&qid=1328405285&sr=1-334
    This is the kind of sander you want to avoid as well.... Look for rubber or neoprene.


    A 3M or Norton sanding sponge would work....just look for one labeled as "fine", "ultra fine" or "super fine" like this one: http://www.amazon.com/Sanding-Sponge-FINE-SANDING-SPONGE/dp/B000CD1MWA/ref=sr_1_611?s=power-hand-tools&ie=UTF8&qid=1328405711&sr=1-611


    I'll try to clarify myself better in future posts.
    Reply to sykozis
  12. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q_YY83dGbEI Thats a case chasis paint mod by mnpc . All ya need to know including prep instructions , what grit paper , cleaning etc . They use a sand blaster but tell ya what to use alternatively . The custom paint jobs can be awsome if done correctly . Have a look .
    Reply to rufus_22
  13. Dang it :/ How much do one of those sanders cost?
    Reply to amuffin
  14. as mentioned above by sykozis you could get away with a sanding sponge = $2.00 approx . according to mnpctech you use 80 grit . which seemed a bit aggressive to me but there the guys with the show right ? The key is to keep even pressure on the sponge or sanding block ( if you should go that way ) essentially let the sand paper do the work . There are other case mods / paint mods on you tube and some that use spray cans only , actually I think I have one saved . I'll post it if I can find it
    Reply to rufus_22
  15. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fgTLF0wONRE&feature=list_related&playnext=1&list=SP65BD555576BCCA3A ok thats the tutorial wou want . Really thorough and easy to follow . His voice will annoy the begeezers out of you but he's very good . His first step is filling over an old 3.5 location if I remember right . Not neccessary to what your doing but interesting . Watch all four sections . He ends up with some basic airbrush techniques .. amazing results ! enjoy !
    Reply to rufus_22
  16. That me be more involved than you were looking to undertake but at least ya know how .
    Reply to rufus_22
  17. rufus_22 said:
    as mentioned above by sykozis you could get away with a sanding sponge = $2.00 approx . according to mnpctech you use 80 grit . which seemed a bit aggressive to me but there the guys with the show right ? The key is to keep even pressure on the sponge or sanding block ( if you should go that way ) essentially let the sand paper do the work . There are other case mods / paint mods on you tube and some that use spray cans only , actually I think I have one saved . I'll post it if I can find it

    80grit is too abbrasive, regardless of what they say. It's fine if you're trying to remove plastic or metal....but it'll ruin aluminum panels. It will also take more work to get a smooth surface. Any idiot can paint using aerosol cans....trust me, I've done it enough times. If you're going to use professional, high-build primers, go ahead and start with 80grit (on steel panels)....just spray 3-4 heavy coats of primer and sand thoroughly with 320-400grit. For using aerosol primers, which generally apply much thinner coats, you need to start with 320grit and finish with either 800grit or scotchbrite pads.
    Reply to sykozis
  18. The 80 grit reference came from a mnpctech tutorial given as an equivelence to the sand blaster they were using . Also note my disclaimer "which seemed a bit aggressive to me " in regaurds to the 80 grit . The second tutorial I posted used much finer grit and progressed up to something like 1000 grit for wet-sanding . I'd like your takes on prepping raw aluminum for paint as I'm gonna be making an aluminum rad frame soon . If you have the time . ty
    Reply to rufus_22
  19. For aluminum, I start by cleaning the panel with mild soap and distilled water. Once clean, sand carefully with 400grit sandpaper, followed by 800grit. Clean with mild soap and distilled water. Apply self-etching primer. I use 2 coats to ensure adequate coverage. Once completely dry, scuff with scotchbrite pads. Clean the surface and apply paint. If you're using epoxy paint, there's no requirement to apply a primer as epoxy bonds to the metal surface. If you wish to apply a clear-coat to the paint, simply scuff the paint with scotchbrite pads and apply 2-3 coats of clear.

    The self-etching primer will bond to the surface better than the paint itself will.

    The use of distilled water is prefered as it doesn't have the chemical contaminants found in "tap" water.
    Reply to sykozis
  20. Ah I see cool . ty much for the info . My entire case is aluminum so I'll definately be putting this to use .
    Reply to rufus_22
  21. I'm using an Antec P180....so, I'm in the same position. It's so boring to look at, I had to start painting it.
    Reply to sykozis
  22. Ill be painting the frame . The skin is brushed black anodized
    Reply to rufus_22
  23. Dang this is so hard to do :/
    Reply to amuffin
  24. rufus_22 said:
    Ill be painting the frame . The skin is brushed black anodized

    Be careful not to get the paint too thick then.
    amuffin said:
    Dang this is so hard to do :/

    Nah....it's easy. Just time consuming.
    Reply to sykozis
  25. ty for the tips !
    Reply to rufus_22
  26. I've discovered that Plastikote's Engine Enamel Aerosol paint is the best for DIY paint jobs on cases and parts. It's very forgiving when you apply it heavy, I'm only guessing, but it may be oil based paint, since it's made to withstand high temps?

    This is a good guide for DIY painting your PC case

    http://themodzoo.com/forum/index.php?/topic/481-diy-mod-guide-painting-anodized-aluminum-pc-case/
    Reply to MonsterMawd
  27. CaedenV said:
    +1 to unksol on that link, looks great!

    1) be sure that the paint you buy is good at adhearing to the materials you are spraying them on. You may need seperate paints for the plastic and the metal, which can lead to some color issues, but better to have a slightly off color than to find that your paint is chipping off a few months later

    2) Paint is all about surface prep. When you think you are done with prep, then do it all again. The smallest problems in this stage can bring a world of hurt (bubling paint, rejected spots/fisheye, chipping, flaking, rub-off etc.)

    3) You get what you pay for. Cheap paint is cheap for a reason. With a nice case that should last a really really long time I would not cheap out on the paint used.

    Enjoy!
    Reply to Timberwolf55
  28. hey im a veteran painter,30 years in the field and have done federal jobs,migs,.stealths,tanks,and also commercial buildings!!
    Ok some one stated using oil based,a good polyurethane(Engine paint is a tad over board,but is basicly the same kind of paint,its more durable and will with stand intense heat,cheap isnt better,but i would for sure get a spray can of paint,do it in layers,lightly,build it up,i have a HVLP,so am ahead of the game) will work excellent,on both plastic and metal,far as the prep,on the plastic,i would use,carpenters putty,water it down a tad so you can do a slurry coat on it,so its smooth,then use unm,maybe 220 or atleast 180 grid sand paper,be careful,im doing the same thing,am taking a full tower by dell and gonna make it Rock..lol...also you can use a good polyurethane caulk,but thats a one step deal,cant sand it,and better be a pro, application wise or your screwed..i would use a carpenters putty like i said for the scratches etc,then i would use kills oil base,can get it in spray cans,then a good oil base finish,color of your choice,and watch it the nozzels will clog,the cheap ones suck..warning ok...get what ya pay for! email me if you have any questions!
    Reply to Timberwolf55
  29. Hello,
    I have my computers painted a few years already. I do it not only for myself but also for my friends. We invent different weird patterns and combine different techniques. We always bring the ready idea to http://goodservice.ca
    and they do everything for us. I recommend.
    Reply to lotekon
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