Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

RAM frequency increases CPU temperatur

Last response: in CPUs
Share
February 4, 2012 10:06:36 AM

Hi,

Increasing the RAM speed more than 1066 MHz (XMP enbaled or not) results in drastic temerature increament to processor, more than 85'C. My RAM and mainboard both support XMP memory profile.

Is this due to any conflict or limitation with the processor/mainboard? I have checked Intel's site that says memory specification to be DDR 3 800/1066 for this processor. Does this mean higher memory frequency cannot be used with this processor?

System remains stable with XMP at 1800 MHz with Intel Turbo Boost disabled but with constant temperature to 86'C which is terrible. Using Microsoft Windows 7 Ultimate x64 with power cooling policy to PASSIVE (decrease processor frequency before increasing fan speed).

Mainboard: Gigabyte GA-EX58-UD3R Rev 1.0 with no performance enhancement and/or OC (Gigabyte)
Processor: Intel Core i7 920 @ 2.66/2.8 GHz (Intel Turbo Boost enabled) with BCLK 133/135, CPU fan is at full speed 24/7 (Intel)
RAM: 4x2 GB Transend aXe DDR III (8-8-8-24) supporting XMP upto 1800 MHz (Transend)
Graphics: AMD Radeon HD 6870 with 1 GB DDR III with no OC (AMD)
PSU: Thermaltek Toughpower XT 875 Watt (Thermaltek)
Internet: Cabled 1 Mbps download & 1 Mbps upload full duplex

Note: System remains active and online 24/7

Thanks in advance for your kind advices
February 4, 2012 10:13:18 AM

FIY, current CPU temperatur is ~65'C with XMP disabled with memory @ 1066 MHz (8-8-8-24). Also note that I am in a region (South East Asia) where ambient temperature is higher than Europe.
m
0
l
Related resources
a b à CPUs
February 4, 2012 10:56:47 AM

Since the memory controllers are integrated into the CPU core, increasing the memory speed puts direct heat load on the cpu core.
It means you can use higher memory speed but your overclocking the memory controller to do it, there for going to generate more heat, so you will have to compensate with increased cooling
m
0
l
February 4, 2012 11:09:46 AM

sosofm said:
First of all you did a great mistake. X58 what is socket 1366 run with triple channel memory , you need something like this http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Looks like I made the mistake :(  However, Gigabyte entitles the RAM as compatible with this mainboard, and they have instruction installing for tripple channel + 1 extended slot for virtually double dual channel.

But you are correct, the system becomes more stable with tripple slot/channel installation at 1800 MHz with Intel Turbo Boost enbaled, though still causes temperature increament.
m
0
l
February 4, 2012 11:13:52 AM

kitsunestarwind said:
Since the memory controllers are integrated into the CPU core, increasing the memory speed puts direct heat load on the cpu core.
It means you can use higher memory speed but your overclocking the memory controller to do it, there for going to generate more heat, so you will have to compensate with increased cooling

That really makes sense.

Transend says the memory modules have a timing of 8-8-8-24 and can operate at 1.7 Volt.

I currently set the modules with 8-8-8-24 at 1.5 Volt, does this cause any memory performace degrade? I have XMP disabled and had to set the timings manually, as standard profile doesn't accept that timing automatically.
m
0
l
February 4, 2012 11:48:15 AM

Increasing the memory frequency shouldn't cause that much load on the PRoccessor. I'm betting that you have your OC profile to auto and it is resulting in less than desirable settings. It is probably overclocking the CPU to accomadate the faster RAM, the RAM controller cannot output enough energy to raise the temp of the CPU on it's own. It's simply to small of a part compared to the actual CPU something like 1/100 or so.

Even if you are not OCing I recommend you read these guides to figure out exactly what everything does and find a more stable configuration.
http://whirlpool.net.au/wiki/rmp_i7_920_overclocking
http://www.overclockers.com/3-step-guide-overclock-core...
m
0
l
February 4, 2012 12:01:50 PM

here a good one I missed
http://www.overclock.net/t/538439/guide-to-overclocking...

and answer to RAM voltage question, at any given voltage/RAM frequency/timings your RAM will either, Run Stable, Run unstable, or not boot at all. If you are running off of non-stock settings I would probably run a stability test on it.
m
0
l
February 4, 2012 12:14:44 PM

jamie_1318 said:
...at any given voltage/RAM frequency/timings your RAM will either, Run Stable, Run unstable, or not boot at all.

Looks like RAM are like wives! However, RAM is stable with 8-8-8-24 @ 1.5 Volt, was wondering if I should put it on 1.7 Volt ;) 
m
0
l
February 4, 2012 12:34:07 PM

NO! max is 1.65 under any condition. 1.6 is safe max.
just go to control panel, search memory, click "Diagnose your computer's memory problems" Reboot and wait for confirmation.

Not kidding if you go to 1.7 you will DESTROY your processor within minutes
m
0
l
a b à CPUs
February 4, 2012 12:40:08 PM

Don't icrease the voltage more then is specified , only if you want a new PC :) 
m
0
l
February 4, 2012 12:50:38 PM

Thanks to both jamie_1318 & sosofm for waking up the blind.
m
0
l
!