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New System Not POSTing

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November 4, 2011 9:18:53 PM

System components:
Intel I7 2600k
ASUS Z68 V - Pro
Corsair Veg. 2x2GB
GTX570
Corsair TX850M
Crucail m4 64gB
WD black 1TB 64mb cache 6GB/s
H80 cooler
Antec 300 case

I put the system together and it will not POST. The board turns on for a second(fans spin/lights turn on) than instantly shuts off. The only light turning on is the CPU indicator LED. Currently I have been testing with the system breadboarded and only using the motherboard, cpu, and memory. Just to get the obvious answers out of the way.. I have..


- Connected the 24pin motherboard and the 8pin CPU power connectors.
- Tried all DIMM configurations.
- Tried using the MemOK button
- Replaced the motherboard, but the problem persists.
- Reset the BIOS.
- Used a high powered scope to check for bent pins. There weren't any bent pins.
- Resocketed the CPU 8-10 times.
- Tried the power supply on another system with success.
- Tried powering current system with another power supply, only to have the motherboard power/reset LEDs strobe in/out.
AKA they didn't work, but not in the same fashion as the TX850M.
- Used a multimeter to ensure voltages under no load conditions (they all met specs).


I am starting to be convinced that I have a bad CPU..

Any / all help is appreciated, just please don't ask me to do something I have already done =P.

More about : system posting

November 4, 2011 9:27:01 PM

Even though you mentioned you tried the PSU with another system and it works, Id try a different PSU with your current board. I had an Asus Z68 V LE not work on a corsair 430 builder edition. But it worked on everything else. Same issue that you are mentioning. Try that then if not, I would say CPU.
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a b B Homebuilt system
November 4, 2011 9:39:51 PM

First, boot with just your CPU, PSU, Heatsink, and MoBo. You should hear it beep.
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Related resources
November 5, 2011 10:43:32 AM

Hi semlethe3rd, can i ask the Specs of your computer?
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November 5, 2011 11:33:32 AM

I would reconnect everything needed to boot the system, that means only leaving in the boot drive, a graphics card if no IGP is available, the CPU in, RAM etc..

If you get it to post, slowly add in one part at a time until the perpetrator is found and test that component in another system if possible.

If the system still doesn't boot you likely have a DOA CPU or Motherboard, as long as you know the other parts are still good or work in another system RMA the new parts that don't seem to work.
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a c 122 B Homebuilt system
November 5, 2011 1:26:04 PM

When you are asking for help, always start off with the system specifications.

The Great Carnack is dead. We need you to tell us these things.

However, onward to some systematic troubleshooting techniques.

Like gkay said, it happens but it is very rare.

Work systematically through our standard checklist and troubleshooting thread:
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/261145-31-read-postin...
I mean work through, not just read over it. We spent a lot of time on this. It should find most of the problems.

If not, continue.
The following is an expansion of my troubleshooting tips in the breadboarding link in the "Cannot boot" thread.

I have tested the following beep patterns on Gigabyte, eVGA, and ECS motherboards. Other BIOS' may be different, but they all use a single short beep for a successful POST.

Breadboard - that will help isolate any kind of case problem you might have.
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/262730-31-breadboardi...

Breadboard with just motherboard, CPU & HSF, case speaker, and PSU.

Make sure you plug the CPU power cable in. The system will not boot without it.

I always breadboard a new build. It takes only a few minutes, and you know you are putting good parts in the case once you are finished.

You can turn on the PC by momentarily shorting the two pins that the case power switch goes to. You can accomplish the same thing by (working from the back of the main power plug) shorting the green wire to one of the neighboring black wires with a paperclip). You should hear a series of long, single beeps indicating memory problems. Silence indicates a problem with (in most likely order) the PSU, motherboard, or CPU. Remember, at this time, you do not have a graphics card installed so the load on your PSU will be reduced.

If no beeps:
Running fans and drives and motherboard LED's do not necessarily indicate a good PSU. In the absence of a single short beep, they also do not indicate that the system is booting.

At this point, you can sort of check the PSU. Try to borrow a known good PSU of around 550 - 600 watts. That will power just about any system with a single GPU. If you cannot do that, use a DMM to measure the voltages. Measure between the colored wires and either chassis ground or the black wires. Yellow wires should be 12 volts. Red wires: +5 volts, orange wires: +3.3 volts, blue wire : -12 volts, violet wire: 5 volts always on. Tolerances are +/- 5% except for the -12 volts which is +/- 10%.

The gray wire is really important. It should go from 0 to +5 volts when you turn the PSU on with the case switch. CPU needs this signal to boot.

You can turn on the PSU by completely disconnecting the PSU and using a paperclip or jumper wire to short the green wire to one of the neighboring black wires.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5FWXgQSokF4&feature=yout...

A way that might be easier is to use the main power plug. Working from the back of the plug where the wires come out, use a bare paperclip to short between the green wire and one of the neighboring black wires. That will do the same thing with an installed PSU. It is also an easy way to bypass a questionable case power switch.

This checks the PSU under no load conditions, so it is not completely reliable. But if it can not pass this, it is dead. Then repeat the checks with the PSU plugged into the computer to put a load on the PSU.

If the system beeps:
If it looks like the PSU is good, install a memory stick. Boot. Beep pattern should change to one long and several short beeps indicating a missing graphics card.

Silence, long single beeps, or series of short beeps indicate a problem with the memory. If you get short beeps verify that the memory is in the appropriate motherboard slots.

Insert the video card and connect any necessary PCIe power connectors. Boot. At this point, the system should POST successfully (a single short beep). Notice that you do not need keyboard, mouse, monitor, or drives to successfully POST.
At this point, if the system doesn't work, it's either the video card or an inadequate PSU. Or rarely - the motherboard's PCIe interface.

Now start connecting the rest of the devices starting with the monitor, then keyboard and mouse, then the rest of the devices, testing after each step. It's possible that you can pass the POST with a defective video card. The POST routines can only check the video interface. It cannot check the internal parts of the video card.
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a c 78 B Homebuilt system
November 5, 2011 1:47:50 PM

Start with bread boarding.

Take everything out of the case and only plug the PSU into the motherboard (both at the 4 or 8 pin CPU connector and at the 20 or 24 pin motherboard connector) and only leave the RAM and CPU connected to the motherboard and then turn it on and see what happens.

When you short the power button wires like jsc described the CPU fan should turn on and stay on if things are working right.
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November 5, 2011 2:30:59 PM

I apologize for not have the system specs. I had them in there when i wrote it, not sure why they didnt show up when i posted it, odd. Anyways,

Intel I7 2600k
ASUS Z68 V - Pro
Corsair Veg. 2x2GB
GTX570
Corsair TX850M
Crucail m4 64gB
WD black 1TB 64mb cache 6GB/s
H80 cooler
Antec 300 case

I will have to admit im disaapointed as always with forums. I tell you all the things I've tried and still people post things I have already told you I have done. Please read my original post closely before posting. Thank you for those of you who didn't post things I have done.

I have read through the troubleshooting sticky, and have performed everything on the list besides checking system beeps. I do not own a mobo speaker. I know they are cheap, but I don't currently have one. All the testing I have been doing is with the system breadboarded, and with only the mobo, cpu, memory, and power supply.
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a c 78 B Homebuilt system
November 5, 2011 2:52:01 PM

The forums aren't perfect, they are completely free after all.

If people were working at a job doing the same things a lot of people would bill their expertise at $90 an hour for what the responders are doing for free.

I think people on the forums are probably disappointed as always when people ask the same questions every day that have already been answered by someone else in the next thread down as well.

There is probably some play there where if the average poster doesn't give 100%, then the responder shouldn't either.

For better or worse, until the quality of questions goes up the quality of answers probably won't either.
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November 5, 2011 3:07:10 PM

Raiddinn said:
The forums aren't perfect, they are completely free after all.

If people were working at a job doing the same things a lot of people would bill their expertise at $90 an hour for what the responders are doing for free.

I think people on the forums are probably disappointed as always when people ask the same questions every day that have already been answered by someone else in the next thread down as well.

There is probably some play there where if the average poster doesn't give 100%, then the responder shouldn't either.

For better or worse, until the quality of questions goes up the quality of answers probably won't either.


The only thing that I didnt post are the system specs, but that wasn't because I forgot them. Somehow they got edited out of my post, because I specifically recall adding them. I have followed the troubleshooting sticky, and performed everything on the list besides the system speaker(which i dont own currently). All I'm asking is to keep on topic, and not to ask me to do things I have already confirmed doing. I rarely post on forums because it's typically just people not reading my post fully, and then replying quickly to get a higher status on the forums. Just gets old, and I was hoping to avoid it this time. Lets not get off topic of the original post. Anyone have an further ideas on how to isolate which component is the root cause?
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November 5, 2011 3:10:01 PM

i too am having the same problem, it seems that a user called timur in the thread below solved the problem by buying a new PSU
http://www.tomshardware.co.uk/forum/324904-13-build-doe...

I took a video of my computer trying to turn on - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e_6fW_U-98I

does it look like yours when you try to turn it on?

i have noticed that me, timur and semlethe3rd all have an i7 2600k, this seems to be the only component we all have and we are all experiencing the same issue

also what is the Wattage of your PSU?

Mine is 530W and timur's was 500W but he has a 850W which solved the problem. mine should get to me on monday, so i will update you if it has solved my issue or if it hasn't.

here is the PSU i have bought to replace my old one - http://www.ebuyer.com/191851-cit-850w-modular-psu-80-du...
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November 5, 2011 5:09:05 PM

mad_mike333 said:
i too am having the same problem, it seems that a user called timur in the thread below solved the problem by buying a new PSU
http://www.tomshardware.co.uk/forum/324904-13-build-doe...

I took a video of my computer trying to turn on - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e_6fW_U-98I

does it look like yours when you try to turn it on?

i have noticed that me, timur and semlethe3rd all have an i7 2600k, this seems to be the only component we all have and we are all experiencing the same issue

also what is the Wattage of your PSU?

Mine is 530W and timur's was 500W but he has a 850W which solved the problem. mine should get to me on monday, so i will update you if it has solved my issue or if it hasn't.

here is the PSU i have bought to replace my old one - http://www.ebuyer.com/191851-cit-850w-modular-psu-80-du...


My PSU is the corsair TX850M, meaning 850W. One thing I've read now more then once, is people having trouble POSTing with a Corsair PSU. I've never previously had trouble with them, but maybe thats what is happening here. I bought everything at Microcenter, so i'll probably replace both the CPU and PSU tomorrow just to be safe.
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November 8, 2011 8:46:43 AM

i have solved my problem. My PSU has a wire with 3 molex connectors AND a 4 pin connector. when i connected my fans via molex, i also plugged in the 4 pin connector into the motherboard.

As this is my first time building a computer from scratch i assumed the 4 pin connector was to be plugged into the motherboard system fan slot.

when i took the 4 pin connector out, the system successfully booted. So it turned out it wasnt a PSU problem at all, just a connection problem.

Hope this helps anyone experiencing the same problem.
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November 8, 2011 11:24:02 AM

My problem was a DOA i7 2600k. Wasn't fun to diagnosis.
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a c 122 B Homebuilt system
November 8, 2011 12:19:53 PM

Congratulations. A dead motherboard never is fun to diagnose.

Sorry your experiences here weren't better. I would like to point out that when you have a nonbooting system, a system speaker is invaluable. Both shortstuff and I mentioned that in our threads.

Breadboarding would eliminate your case and a system speaker would have immediately eliminated everything except the PSU, motherboard, and CPU. So you didn't do everything we suggested. :) 
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November 8, 2011 12:42:46 PM

Thanks for proving my point that people aren't actually reading what I'm posting. A DOA i7 2600k is not a motherboard, its a processor. And I had already pointed out I didn't use a system speaker, "I have followed the troubleshooting sticky, and performed everything on the list besides the system speaker(which i dont own currently)". I had also already told you I had breadboarded the system, "Currently I have been testing with the system breadboarded and only using the motherboard, cpu, and memory". Please read everything before commenting, thats all I've ever wanted out of these forums..
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December 4, 2011 7:05:03 PM

Hopefully not a stupid Question: In the scenario described above, with only CPU, PSU and RAM attached, when the motherboard (hopefully) POSTS, would one hear beeping from the mother board without a system speaker in place or another speaker plugged into an output jack, for that matter? In other words, if there are no speakers attached to the board, is there a way for the beeping to be heard?
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a c 78 B Homebuilt system
December 4, 2011 7:26:00 PM

With no PC speaker you can't hear anything.
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December 4, 2011 7:28:24 PM

Gotcha. Thanks very much.
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