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First build, advice on this $1000 budget build - Help is appreciated!

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November 5, 2011 2:29:34 AM

I ended up going with this build to see what it would come out to, which is about $1080 after MIBs. Can you guys give advice? Thanks in advance.

ASUS DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS Black SATA 24X DVD Burner
COOLER MASTER HAF 922 RC-922M-KKN1-GP Black Steel + Plastic and Mesh Bezel ATX Mid Tower Computer Case
Western Digital Caviar Green WD7500AARX 750GB IntelliPower SATA 6.0Gb/s 3.5" Internal Hard Drive
OCZ ModXStream Pro 600W Modular High Performance Power Supply
G.SKILL Ripjaws Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600
ASRock Z68 Extreme3 Gen3 LGA 1155 Intel Z68 HDMI SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard
EVGA 012-P3-1571-KR GeForce GTX 570 HD w/Display-Port (Fermi) 1280MB 320-bit GDDR5 PCI Express 2.0 x16
Intel Core i5-2500K Sandy Bridge 3.3GHz (3.7GHz Turbo Boost) LGA 1155 95W Quad-Core Desktop Processor

Totaling $1,024.17 with shipping, and $989.17 after the rebates.

Not going to lie, that's a lot of firepower for ~$1000. I'll have to wait on the SSD, Thailand getting flooded really shot up the prices of drives.

Thanks in advance.

More about : build advice 1000 budget build appreciated

November 5, 2011 2:44:08 AM

I would get another psu , maybe this one;

Antec High Current Gamer Series HCG-750 750W ATX12V v2.3 / EPS12V v2.91 SLI Certified CrossFire Certified 80 PLUS BRONZE Certified Active PFC Power Supply
$99.99

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

or this one;

Thermaltake TR2 RX 750W Bronze W0382RU ATX 12V v2.3 / EPS 12V v2.91 SLI Ready CrossFire Ready 80 PLUS BRONZE Certified Modular Active PFC Power Supply
$89.99

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

What size SSD were you looking at , the price has actually dropped on this one;

Corsair Force Series GT CSSD-F120GBGT-BK 2.5" 120GB SATA III Internal Solid State Drive (SSD) $199.99

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

OCZ Vertex 3 VTX3-25SAT3-120G 2.5" 120GB SATA III MLC Internal Solid State Drive (SSD) $189.99 and a $20 rebate

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

So it looks like the prices are actually being reduced right now so it would be a good time to grab one.
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November 5, 2011 2:45:38 AM

This is nearly identical to a system I spec'd out as a back up in case my wife goes ballistic to the $1500 rig I want to build. So ya It's solid. My only question is what are you going to use for cpu cooling? Stock? I would recommend the Cooler Master Hyper 212 Plus. It will compete with coolers twice its price.
Good call on that Antec PSU by the way.
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November 5, 2011 2:59:48 AM

Avoid the Thermaltake TR2. Thermaltake drives, if they can even deliver stated wattage, tend to have absolutely huge ripple charts using oscilloscopes.

Here is a review of of the 750w in question

http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/article/Thermaltake-TR2-...

Notice how the word FAIL is written so many times on the charts and how those yellow lines are huge on the graphs. The first FAIL is at 583w, which is well below 750. The last safe one was at 440.

To contrast, here is a 750w Corsair drive instead

http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/article/Corsair-HX750W-P...

Note the lack of FAILs and how thin the 12v graphs are. Those 12v graphs are thinner than the Thermaltake 5v graphs even at 2.4x the juice. The Corsair 750w 5v and 3.3v graphs are almost straight lines.

In case it is unclear, that is an improvement. The corsair 750w (on the next page) had a successful pull of 913 on the PSU, as compared to the last successful pull on the Thermaltake of 440.

Stick with Antec, Corsair, XFX, or Seasonic on PSUs.

I am not a big fan of OCZs, but they are way better than the Thermaltakes at least.

Also, feel free to look here

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/overclock-cpu-ssd,3...

That is a link to a monthly full PC build competition run by this website for $500, $1000, and $2000 PCs (that being the $1000 one).

If I were in the market for a $1000 PC, I would probably start from there and then modify things as necessary rather than trying to piece things together individually if it were me. Starting with 2x 4GB sticks of RAM.

In any event, those PCs are reviewed by experts and work well.

What you have doesn't look too bad, though. Either way would be fine.

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November 5, 2011 3:41:09 AM

Ok I'll take another glance at PSUs, in that case.
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