Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

ULV CPUs for Ultrabooks (i5-2467m) is marketing gimmick!

Last response: in CPUs
Share
February 6, 2012 7:39:14 PM

I have a samsung series 7 slate with i5-2467m, and a toshiba portege r835 with i5-2435m.
I noticed the idle power usage is about the same for both models, around 7.5 mW. Of course when full load, the regular voltage cpu will use much more power.
The CPU both idles at close to 800 mHz, and near 0.776V-0.8V. Suprisingly the i5-2467m is 0.8V, and the i5-2435m is the lower 0.776V.
Just by looking at these, the regular voltage i5 is actually using less power on idle which is important for laptops.

So, as long as I can limit (throttle) the CPU speed of the regular voltage to a certain level, this means it'll be much cheaper than having a ULV CPU inside with similar performance. I think that's what Toshiba portege's approach was. A bonus to this is that if I need more cpu power, I can always unleash the limit and use the full potential of the regular voltage cpu while the ULV is locked in to its max turbo frequency. Of course I would use a laptop cooler if I need the cpu to stay at 100% for more than a minute. But I think it even helps while surfing internet with the micro boosts of cpu speed.

If Ultrabooks had regular voltage cpu, and it's throttled by controlling the power settings in Windows, I think this would be the best option for people like me (likes to tinker with settings). Sure, the thin profile of the Ultrabook is probably why they absolutely want to limit the cpu speed and only allow a ULV in it, but wouldn't it have helped if the cpu can go to 3 GHz for 0.5 second when needed without heating up too much?

I hope Tom's can do an article about the power usage for mobile cpus. I know I've seen one about desktop ULVs somewhere, but not for mobile platform. In the past, the ULV cpus had lower idle voltages too (which regular voltage cpus can achieve too with software), but for Sandy Bridge, I think that all changed now. I'd like to see an article using a i5-2410m or any regular voltage cpu like a ULV cpu and see if there really should be a premium of getting a ULV cpu.
February 13, 2012 11:50:59 PM

Quote:
so ?
I don't get why you're so mad about it.


No, I'm not mad about anything. I'm just thinking could intel be just using the same i5-2410m and just cap the max speed, label it as i5-2467m? I tried capping my RV i5 cpu to 2GHz, and the power usage (clock x voltage) was very close for both machines.
In the past, the ULV cpus are indeed better binned parts. I don't think that's the case any more, and wanted some insight from others.
Also, it might not matter to you if you only use a desktop and do not consider buying Ultrabooks or Sandybridge ULV equipped laptops.
m
0
l
a c 185 à CPUs
February 14, 2012 3:43:06 AM

m
0
l
!