Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Solved

Rebuilding New Mobo + CPU

Last response: in Systems
Share
November 8, 2011 4:44:21 AM

Approximate Purchase Date: This week.

Budget Range: $160 to $180.

System Usage from Most to Least Important: PC games + console game emulation.

Parts Needed: Motherboard, CPU + Cooler, 4 GB RAM, Thermal Paste.

Parts Not Required: Cooler Master Centurion 532 Mid-Tower, Antec True Power 2.0 550W, 2x 250 GB SATA HDDs, XFX GeForce 8800 GTX, Audigy 2 ZS Sound Card, Monitor, Keyboard, Mouse, Windows 7 64-bit install.

Preferred Website(s) for Parts: microcenter.com, newegg.com.

Country of Origin: USA.

Overclocking: Yes, CPU + RAM.

SLI or Crossfire: No.

Monitor Resolution: 1600 x 900.

Additional Comments: My setup has performed well in the past, but it's showing its age due to a heavily outdated board (Lanparty nF4 SLI-DR) and processor (Opteron 165, Socket 939). I'll upgrade both the mobo and CPU since I'd be mad to buy a slightly better Socket 939 CPU.

I've done my research and AMD is my best option for a budget upgrade. Specifically, the Phenom II X4 830 is being sold for $49.99 at Microcenter. Compared to the 840, it's 400 MHz slower, but the L3 Cache is just too good to pass up from what I've read. I'll try overclocking this CPU from 2.8 to 3.6 GHz and higher.

An AM3+ board would be nice for future CPU upgrading. SLI/Crossfire is not important to me. The best option I've found is the ASRock 970 Extreme3 for $84.99. I've read how someone successfully overclocked their quad-core CPU to 4GHz although this board only has a 4+1 VRM phase. The 830 is not on the supported CPUs list for this board, but I've read that it's simply a renamed 925.

For the CPU cooler, I plan on getting the Hyper 212 Plus. It's a bit smaller, cheaper, and quieter than the V6GT. I have a Thermaltake Big Typhoon that I was thinking of reusing, but the mounting bracket needed for AM3 compatibility isn't sold anymore. The Hyper should be able to fit in my case with a bit of room to spare, and I've heard that it clears G.SKILL Ripjaw-size RAM overhead, which the mobo will likely avoid anyway. I plan on pointing the cooler toward my back case fan in a push-pull system.

Lastly, I'm pretty sure my Antec TruePower 2.0 550W will be able to power this rebuild, although I need to use a 4-pin to 8-pin power adapter.

All in all:

ASRock 970 Extreme3 - $84.99 ($7.56 Shipping)
AMD Phenom II X4 830 - $49.99
G.SKILL Ripjaws X Series 2x 2GB DDR3 1600 - $29.99
Hyper 212 Plus CPU Cooler - $25.99
Rosewill 9.5" EPS 8-Pin Male to ATX 4-Pin - $5.98

Total: $203.66~

There's not much I can do to lower the total unless I forego AM3+. If anyone has suggestions, please feel free to reply. :hello: 

More about : rebuilding mobo cpu

a c 136 B Homebuilt system
a c 75 à CPUs
November 8, 2011 4:53:31 AM

I think your logic and research are sound

[but I wouldnt pay for thermal paste when it makes no real difference except to your wallet ]
m
0
l
November 8, 2011 5:09:41 AM

Thanks, I spent a lot of time just learning about PC components during all this. About the thermal paste, it's just that I've heard so many good things about quality brands that reduce temperatures by 4 to 10 degrees C under heavy load. Of course my mileage will vary, but being able to gain an overclock advantage is just so tempting. :p 
m
0
l
Related resources
November 8, 2011 5:12:19 AM

I know a cooler like the H70 uses a great thermal paste... and its a great performance cooler. I always have an extra couple tubes of paste but I'm an enthusiast :p 
m
0
l

Best solution

a c 136 B Homebuilt system
a c 75 à CPUs
November 8, 2011 7:44:08 AM

burntoast said:
Thanks, I spent a lot of time just learning about PC components during all this. About the thermal paste, it's just that I've heard so many good things about quality brands that reduce temperatures by 4 to 10 degrees C under heavy load. Of course my mileage will vary, but being able to gain an overclock advantage is just so tempting. :p 


I am very skeptical about such claims .

The processors heat shield is smooth machined metal , the heatsink base is of a good polish .
The best heat transfer is when there is NO paste . The paste just helps transfer some heat across microscopic gaps that may be present . Ideally you use as little as possible

Actually Im not that skeptical . You can install TIM incorrectly [ too much ] and that will cause a cpu to run hot , but I have never seen any evidence that the marketing claims of arctic silver and similar products perform a thermal miracle
[like dropping temps 10 degrees C ]
Share
November 8, 2011 4:11:23 PM

Exactly, you want to use AS LITTLE AS POSSIBLE but make sure you cover the ENTIRE surface, I get really picky about mine and spend 5 minutes doing it :p . Get a package that comes with the spreader! and keep it, or cut a credit card.
m
0
l
a c 136 B Homebuilt system
a c 75 à CPUs
November 8, 2011 6:01:09 PM

the edge of a cardboard business card is a perfect spreader

use once and throw away
m
0
l
November 8, 2011 6:14:47 PM

Ah, I should have figured the Hyper 212 Plus already came with a TIM. I've read that it's probably a decent OCZ brand, so I'll forego buying the MX-2. I've already read a guide for optimally applying TIM to an HDT-type cooler, so no worries there.

This drops my total by $8.98, but the G.SKILL Ripjaws RAM for $26.99 got marked up. I could buy practically the same RAM for $29.99, but (curse my temptations) I've found the G.SKILL Sniper 2x 4GB for only $39.99. Compared to 2x 2GB Ripjaws, I only pay $10 (33%) more for double (100%) the RAM. The description page also states the Sniper is compatible with AM3+, but I guess this is just a marketing scheme. At any rate, it's sure to last me a while.

New Total: $213.66

Any other suggestions? :D  I'm a bit impatient as I want to start rebuilding asap.
m
0
l
November 14, 2011 11:59:00 PM

Best answer selected by burntoast.
m
0
l
!