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Adamant to use my mini fridge.

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October 7, 2011 5:05:23 PM

i have a decent sized mini fridge that i want to use to cool my system. my idea is to simply mount my motherboard inside and seal it up with maybe a small hole so that pressure doesnt build too much. anywho, i was wandering if i do this what i need to do to make it work sufficiently and how to stop condensation. im going to probably give it a test run with a pos xbox360 i have laying around this weekend. any thoughts?

More about : adamant mini fridge

October 7, 2011 5:39:59 PM

I assume your cabling will also exit the hole?

Condensation is definitely going to be an issue. Also, "building pressure" shouldn't be too big a deal as you will simply be recycling air inside the frig. The heat generated won't likely build to the point where the door will be forced open. However, as the frig tries to maintain its temp, it will work harder and make the condensation issue more of a concern.

Enjoy your experiment.
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October 7, 2011 6:00:35 PM

what ways could i get rid of condensation? is there an easy way to pull the moisture out of the air to a safe point? and if i did a direct dye system would i still have to worry about condensation?
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October 8, 2011 2:12:48 AM

Many, many people have tried this. A household fridge or freezer isn't designed to constantly remove that much heat non-stop. They are designed to remove heat to a specific temperature and then cycle on when they need to drop 1-2 degrees. Your idea will cause the compressor to run all the time and will burn up.

http://www.overclock.net/faqs/105345-info-fridge-pc-cooler.html
http://www.overclock.net/cooling-experiments/110378-putting-fridge-cooling-system-rest.html
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October 8, 2011 7:03:32 AM

If you wanted something a little overkill, I have a vague memory of the v10 coolermaster heatsink, it had a unique function of being able to use I believe it was a Peltier effect I want to call it to cool the cpu quickly. Only thing people complained about was it was almost never used because it would only activate when the CPU hit around 70c I heard to prevent overcooling the CPU and creating condensation. So it was used as a normal heatsink for 99.99999% of the people who bought it, and for the price there were better heatsinks for less, so it wasn't the best bang for the buck.

http://www.coolermaster-usa.com/product.php?product_id=...
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thermoelectric_cooling

Mention this because it may be something to look into if you thought the refridgerator idea was neat.
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October 10, 2011 12:20:14 PM

Best answer selected by nagol567.
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October 10, 2011 9:34:17 PM

I'll be honest...the only reason you would need/want to use a fridge or freezer would be to run a phase change system, but that involves a decent amount of work...not simply 'putting stuff in the fridge'.
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November 26, 2011 3:25:27 PM

you know when you open a fridge and all that steam pours out? thats your issue. de humidifiers are out, they produce almost as much heat as a heater and the whole system would be counter productive. desilicant packs?
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February 8, 2012 5:15:13 PM

This topic has been moved from the section Overclocking to section CPU & Components by Jpishgar
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February 8, 2012 6:38:40 PM

This topic has been closed by Mousemonkey
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