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Home video editing Build

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November 9, 2011 7:51:28 PM

Looking to build my first PC and I am having trouble deciding on a CPU and MOBO. The PC will be used for typical home stuff, streaming music and video, and editing video. I don't game at all and find most hardware advice geared to that.

I was wondering what the video & cpu needs are for basic home video editing. Is going with an H67/ i5-2500 good enough to handle that? Or am I better off upping to an i7-2600 and/or a Z68 mobo. I've played with OC'ing in the past, but I'm pretty sure I'd overbuy and never really find the time to mess with it, so it's no a main concern- I'd rather save $150 than have it I guess.

Thanks

More about : home video editing build

November 10, 2011 5:01:19 AM

Hello kwyjibo13;

For just casual and occasional home video editing a Core i5-2300 / H67 combo will get the job done without any fuss and in a fairly rapid manner. For all your home office and entertainment usages it's a fine option.
Core i5-2500 / Z68 would be a bit faster, of course. But the there is no job the i5-2500 or i7-2600 can do that the i5-2300 can't also do.
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November 10, 2011 7:17:20 AM

Usually video editing programs benefit from multicore CPUs. So according to your budget I would look for either AMD FX 8120 or AMD Phenom II X6 1090T along with 16GB of RAM.
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November 10, 2011 3:06:16 PM

Thanks. Budget isn't a major concern, I just don't want to waste money. I'm partial to Intel. Would I be correct in saying a dedicated video card is probably not necessary?
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November 10, 2011 3:13:54 PM

That would be correct. The integrated HD Graphics handles everything but 3D gaming.

And adding a video card later is a no-drama upgrade. (as long as the power supply can cope).
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November 10, 2011 3:27:58 PM

What kind of video are you editing? HD? That takes all the power your system can provide. If budget is not a concern go with the i7 2600. What software are you using? Adobe Premiere does use the graphics card to accelerate rendering and other operations. Other software may do that now and certainly will do that in the future. Here is a link to Adobe's list of approved graphics cards for Premiere, http://www.adobe.com/products/premiere/tech-specs.html.

Edit: for some reason that link isn't working for me. If it doesn't work for you just google adobe premiere graphics card.
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November 10, 2011 3:48:35 PM

KentC said:
What kind of video are you editing? HD? That takes all the power your system can provide.
Thats true.
But if your system has - say a C2D CPU - and an old modest GPU - it will still take all the power the system can provide. And still get the work done just fine.
Just not as fast a more powerful system.

Most of the casual video editors don't use Premiere Pro though. A lot more are using Windows Live Movie Maker for example. And it doesn't need top flight hardware to handle HD video.

For someone only editing the occasional home video the i7 2700K/Z68/GeForce GTX 570 plus a $800 copy of Premiere Pro route is a bit over the top.


Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5 / Tech specs

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November 10, 2011 3:50:42 PM

It's best to buy according to what programs you 'll use. If you want "pro" programs like premiere, sony vegas etc look at i7 2600 + Z68 motherboard. If you 'll use Movie maker 1090T seems ideal ;)  Be sure to get 16GB of RAM
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November 10, 2011 3:58:19 PM

The i5 blows away the AMD processors for most tasks, but the Phenom II X6 1090T can match it for some video editing/transcoding tasks. Also of note, the i5 uses a lot less energy, but it does cost more.

However, the i5-2500k has the HD3000 graphics and Intel Quick Sync. If you want to transcode the AMD chpis can't touch the i5/i7 when using quick sync. (note that the non-k version has HD2000 graphics and I don't know how much that drops the performance of quick sync since everyone seems to evaluate it with the HD3000). If you don't want to use the Quick Sync feature for transcoding, then in terms of performance it really depends exactly what you are doing. The i7-2600/k will always be #1, but the FX-8150, Phenom II X6 1100T, and i5-2500/k trade blows depending on what video task you are doing.

You do not need a graphics card, but some editing programs can take advantage of them. For home use it isn't necessary, but you can always add one later. For example, I use Sony Vegas 9 and it doesn't use GPU hardware acceleration so no real need for a graphics card. If I updated to the latest version I could take advantage of the OpenCL support.

I'm going to suggest you get the i5-2500k with a Z68 motherboard and the Cooler Master Hyper 212+. You can overclock to 4GHz without thinking and be safe, which will increase the speed. If you don't want to overclock you'll still get the benefits of quick sync and the HD3000 integrated graphics.

For the motherboard there are a few options depending on what features you need/want. I'd choose from one of these:
GIGABYTE GA-Z68M-D2H LGA 1155 - $95 after rebate - no USB 3.0, may not be able to overclock high but should hit 4GHz.
ASRock Z68 PRO3-M LGA 1155 - $110 - USB 3.0, may not be able to overclock high but should hit 4GHz.
ASRock Z68 Extreme3 Gen3 - $125 (at superbiiz.com) - USB 3.0, not the best overclocker, but can hit 4.5GHz with little problem. Also has PCIe 3.0 support but you probably don't care about that.

As a note, quick sync is what swayed me to buy an i5-2500k and Z68 chipset for my own HD home video editing and gaming system. You can see my system specs in my sig.
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November 10, 2011 5:35:01 PM

nordlead said:
The i5 blows away the AMD processors for most tasks, but the Phenom II X6 1090T can match it for some video editing/transcoding tasks. Also of note, the i5 uses a lot less energy, but it does cost more.

However, the i5-2500k has the HD3000 graphics and Intel Quick Sync. If you want to transcode the AMD chpis can't touch the i5/i7 when using quick sync. (note that the non-k version has HD2000 graphics and I don't know how much that drops the performance of quick sync since everyone seems to evaluate it with the HD3000). If you don't want to use the Quick Sync feature for transcoding, then in terms of performance it really depends exactly what you are doing. The i7-2600/k will always be #1, but the FX-8150, Phenom II X6 1100T, and i5-2500/k trade blows depending on what video task you are doing.

You do not need a graphics card, but some editing programs can take advantage of them. For home use it isn't necessary, but you can always add one later. For example, I use Sony Vegas 9 and it doesn't use GPU hardware acceleration so no real need for a graphics card. If I updated to the latest version I could take advantage of the OpenCL support.

I'm going to suggest you get the i5-2500k with a Z68 motherboard and the Cooler Master Hyper 212+. You can overclock to 4GHz without thinking and be safe, which will increase the speed. If you don't want to overclock you'll still get the benefits of quick sync and the HD3000 integrated graphics.

For the motherboard there are a few options depending on what features you need/want. I'd choose from one of these:
GIGABYTE GA-Z68M-D2H LGA 1155 - $95 after rebate - no USB 3.0, may not be able to overclock high but should hit 4GHz.
ASRock Z68 PRO3-M LGA 1155 - $110 - USB 3.0, may not be able to overclock high but should hit 4GHz.
ASRock Z68 Extreme3 Gen3 - $125 (at superbiiz.com) - USB 3.0, not the best overclocker, but can hit 4.5GHz with little problem. Also has PCIe 3.0 support but you probably don't care about that.

As a note, quick sync is what swayed me to buy an i5-2500k and Z68 chipset for my own HD home video editing and gaming system. You can see my system specs in my sig.


Big deal...I can also use gpu to transcode media....but here we are taking about CPUs.... And truth is that AMD FX 8120 and 1090T are close or better than i5 2500 at such tasks...
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November 10, 2011 5:45:19 PM

I just got an HD camera, so I am just getting into doing more editing. I have a ton of older Digital8 (via Firewire) that I have just started editing down. That's when I discovered my old jalopy of a PC was no where up to the task. I have used a variety of software in the past - Sony Vegas, Cyberlink PowerDirector, and Adobe Premier Elements. I'm just now getting back into it and it's a hobby I can see spending more time on it.

USB 3.0 is certainly something I want as the newer external drives support those speeds and I envision copying large files there.

This PC also serves as a media server and as a Play On server (to some degree) for appliances in the rest of the house, so a 2500k with a Z68 Mobo (ASRock) will probably make the most sense. That's the route I was leaning when I started wondering if I was on the wrong track. Who knows, maybe I'll just blow an extra $100 and get the 2600k.

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November 10, 2011 6:45:40 PM

michxymi said:
Big deal...I can also use gpu to transcode media....but here we are taking about CPUs.... And truth is that AMD FX 8120 and 1090T are close or better than i5 2500 at such tasks...


Yes, you can use a GPU to transcode media, but first off he would have to buy a GPU, which he is talking about not buying. Secondly, the transcoding is better and faster than GPU transcoding. With Media Converter 7 as the test software CUDA transcoding on a GTX looks bad (I can easily distinguish that screen as the worst) and the OpenCL (ATI Stream), CPU, and Quick Sync are all much closer and hard to tell apart.

http://www.anandtech.com/show/4083/the-sandy-bridge-rev...

If you aren't going to use Quick Sync to transcode, then like I said the FX8150 and 1100T trade blows with the i5-2500.

I haven't used it yet only because of an RMA issue, but I do take short family videos that I just want to throw on youtube without editing. Quick Sync and Media Espresso are perfect for this.

EDIT: there are three peices of software that I know of that use quick sync at this time.

Cyberlink's Media Espresso 6.5
Cyberlink's PowerDirector 9 and 10
Arcsoft's MediaConverter 7 and up
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November 11, 2011 2:38:14 PM

Best answer selected by kwyjibo13.
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February 24, 2012 5:30:35 PM

Hi, I'm interested in doing a similar build as you for mainly home video editing and some light gaming. I'm just wondering how your build has worked out for you so far. Also, if you don't mind, what was your total overall cost for your build and what software do you use for editing your movies. Thanks.

Darren
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February 24, 2012 11:59:11 PM

This topic has been closed by Mousemonkey
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