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Nikon D50 vs D70s?

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Anonymous
April 21, 2005 12:44:16 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

The Nikon D50 was just announced.

Could somebody please give a short run-down of what is missing
versus the D70s? AFAICT nothing but CF card slot.

More about : nikon d50 d70s

Anonymous
April 21, 2005 1:52:42 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <4267ca50@news.meer.net>, Bill Tuthill <can@spam.co> wrote:

> The Nikon D50 was just announced.
>
> Could somebody please give a short run-down of what is missing
> versus the D70s? AFAICT nothing but CF card slot.

See...

<http://www.dpreview.com/articles/nikond50/&gt;

--
Remove _me_ for e-mail address
Anonymous
April 21, 2005 10:13:38 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <116fmiqmrjkje1c@corp.supernews.com>, prager_me_@ieee.org
says...
> In article <4267ca50@news.meer.net>, Bill Tuthill <can@spam.co> wrote:
>
> > The Nikon D50 was just announced.
> >
> > Could somebody please give a short run-down of what is missing
> > versus the D70s? AFAICT nothing but CF card slot.
>
> See...
>
> <http://www.dpreview.com/articles/nikond50/&gt;
>
>
Interesting what the details can tell.

The D50 has one command wheel, and the D70 has two. It might
not seem like a big deal, but I have my D70 configured so that
the EV override is on the front command wheel (without a
second finger pressing the EV override button), and the back
command wheel overrides aperture. Those are two exposure
controls I use a lot, and it's nice to have both of them
easily accessible and changeable under my right hand without
taking my eye from the viewfinder. Neat!

I couldn't do that with the D50, it seems. Something you'd
never miss, unless you knew that you needed it.

Switching subjects slightly, the same page shows a new
55-200 DX lens. Any information available about that yet?
Doesn't look like there's a separate manual focusing ring.
(Same comment about the new 18-55 DX lens.)

Diane
Related resources
Can't find your answer ? Ask !
April 21, 2005 10:13:39 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Diane Wilson wrote:
>
> ...I have my D70 configured so that
> the EV override is on the front command wheel (without a
> second finger pressing the EV override button), and the back
> command wheel overrides aperture.


How do you do this? P mode?
Anonymous
April 21, 2005 10:13:39 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Diane Wilson <diane@firelily.com> wrote:
>
>> [Most important missing feature is] no CF card slot.
>
> The D50 has one command wheel, and the D70 has two.

I did not notice that! Thanks for pointing it out. I agree
the 2nd command dial is useful, but with Program Shift not
totally necessary. One dial really sux for manual exposure.

> Switching subjects slightly, the same page shows a new
> 55-200 DX lens. Any information available about that yet?
> Doesn't look like there's a separate manual focusing ring.
> (Same comment about the new 18-55 DX lens.)

Oops, I missed that too. Press releases are always boring
and it's hard reading white letters on a black background.

Looks like it might be able to share filters with the 18-55.

I was wondering why anyone would want a 18-55 DX lens,
especially with slow f/3.5-5.6 aperture, considering
that Nikon hasn't issued a moderate long zoom since the
50-135/3.5 and 50-300/4.5 (don't know which came first).
Anonymous
April 21, 2005 10:13:40 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Bill Tuthill <can@spam.co> writes:
> I was wondering why anyone would want a 18-55 DX lens,
> especially with slow f/3.5-5.6 aperture,

It's aimed at people who want cheap entry level lenses. The 18-55 is
the full frame equivalent of a 28-90 and those were hot sellers in the
entry level SLR segment. Point and shoot zooms are of course even
slower, and many people who buy those SLR's really want glorified
point-and-shoots.
Anonymous
April 21, 2005 10:34:48 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Thu, 21 Apr 2005 11:16:39 -0700, paul <paul@not.net> wrote:

>Diane Wilson wrote:
> >
>> ...I have my D70 configured so that
>> the EV override is on the front command wheel (without a
>> second finger pressing the EV override button), and the back
>> command wheel overrides aperture.
>
>How do you do this? P mode?

Nah, it's all in the custom Menu - CSM 10.

--
Owamanga!
http://www.pbase.com/owamanga
April 21, 2005 10:34:49 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Owamanga wrote:

> On Thu, 21 Apr 2005 11:16:39 -0700, paul <paul@not.net> wrote:
>
>
>>Diane Wilson wrote:
>>
>>>...I have my D70 configured so that
>>>the EV override is on the front command wheel (without a
>>>second finger pressing the EV override button), and the back
>>>command wheel overrides aperture.
>>
>>How do you do this? P mode?
>
>
> Nah, it's all in the custom Menu - CSM 10.


Oh yeah, I'm going to like this.
Purple pencil menu, turn ON Exp. comp.
Basically lets you control shutter in aperture priority mode & aperture
in shutter priority mode.
Anonymous
April 21, 2005 11:30:36 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <0msf61phs5istlslc48308lqav1p6i0ooc@4ax.com>, Owamanga <owamanga
(not-this-bit)@hotmail.com> says...
> On Thu, 21 Apr 2005 11:16:39 -0700, paul <paul@not.net> wrote:
>
> >Diane Wilson wrote:
> > >
> >> ...I have my D70 configured so that
> >> the EV override is on the front command wheel (without a
> >> second finger pressing the EV override button), and the back
> >> command wheel overrides aperture.
> >
> >How do you do this? P mode?
>
> Nah, it's all in the custom Menu - CSM 10.

P mode (it might not work in Auto), CSM 10 ON, CSM 14 YES

You kinda have to juggle around CSM 10 and 14; you can pick
two of shutter override, aperture override, and EV override
for the command dials, and depending on your shooting mode.

Diane
Anonymous
April 21, 2005 11:45:20 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <MPG.1cd1c96b39a7108f989ac6@news-server>, diane@firelily.com
says...
> In article <0msf61phs5istlslc48308lqav1p6i0ooc@4ax.com>, Owamanga <owamanga
> (not-this-bit)@hotmail.com> says...
> > On Thu, 21 Apr 2005 11:16:39 -0700, paul <paul@not.net> wrote:
> >
> > >Diane Wilson wrote:
> > > >
> > >> ...I have my D70 configured so that
> > >> the EV override is on the front command wheel (without a
> > >> second finger pressing the EV override button), and the back
> > >> command wheel overrides aperture.
> > >
> > >How do you do this? P mode?
> >
> > Nah, it's all in the custom Menu - CSM 10.
>
> P mode (it might not work in Auto), CSM 10 ON, CSM 14 YES
>
> You kinda have to juggle around CSM 10 and 14; you can pick
> two of shutter override, aperture override, and EV override
> for the command dials, and depending on your shooting mode.
>
> Diane
>
Oh,yes. The other trick is that a simple OFF/ON of the
camera will reset EV override. Resetting aperture or
shutter override is either by dialing back until the
override clears (P* indicator on control panel in P mode),
or a full reset.

The EV override beats the heck out of trying to set up auto
bracketing on the fly.

Diane
Anonymous
April 21, 2005 11:45:21 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Diane Wilson" <diane@firelily.com> wrote in message
news:MPG.1cd1ccdd9f52e402989ac7@news-server...
> In article <MPG.1cd1c96b39a7108f989ac6@news-server>, diane@firelily.com
> says...
>> In article <0msf61phs5istlslc48308lqav1p6i0ooc@4ax.com>, Owamanga
>> <owamanga
>> (not-this-bit)@hotmail.com> says...
>> > On Thu, 21 Apr 2005 11:16:39 -0700, paul <paul@not.net> wrote:
>> >
>> > >Diane Wilson wrote:
>> > > >
>> > >> ...I have my D70 configured so that
>> > >> the EV override is on the front command wheel (without a
>> > >> second finger pressing the EV override button), and the back
>> > >> command wheel overrides aperture.
>> > >
>> > >How do you do this? P mode?
>> >
>> > Nah, it's all in the custom Menu - CSM 10.
>>
>> P mode (it might not work in Auto), CSM 10 ON, CSM 14 YES
>>
>> You kinda have to juggle around CSM 10 and 14; you can pick
>> two of shutter override, aperture override, and EV override
>> for the command dials, and depending on your shooting mode.
>>
>> Diane
>>
> Oh,yes. The other trick is that a simple OFF/ON of the
> camera will reset EV override. Resetting aperture or
> shutter override is either by dialing back until the
> override clears (P* indicator on control panel in P mode),
> or a full reset.
>
> The EV override beats the heck out of trying to set up auto
> bracketing on the fly.
>
> Diane

I've never been happy setting up the front wheel to control EV. Every once
in a while I'd accidentally move the wheel while carrying the camera.
Leaving it in default mode I have to use a button and the wheel, very hard
to do by accident.

As to your original question, I think the aside from the front wheel, the
D50 is not as fast as the D70s in continuous mode. I also doubt the glass
for the D50 is as good or as versatile as the glass that comes with the
D70s. I'd either get a D70 now, with all the rebates, or take a wait see.
From what I've read the D70s doesn't offer a lot more than the D70 does now.
Anonymous
April 22, 2005 12:33:55 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Sheldon <sheldon@xxxxxxxxsopris.net> wrote:
>
> I also doubt the glass for the D50 is as good or as versatile
> as the glass that comes with the D70s.

Until the tests are in, who knows?

The 18-70/3.5-4.5 DX that comes with the D70 kit might be sharp
but it has hellacious barrel distortion at much of the wide end.
It's almost like a fisheye lens. I wouldn't want one. I'd get
the Sigma 18-125 instead, which has more moderate distortion.
(I posted its Pop Photo numbers a while back.)

focal range & 35equiv weight length close filter
Nikon 18-55/3.5-5.6 DX 27-82 210g 74mm 28cm ø52
Nikon 55-200/4-5.6 DX 82-300 255g 79mm 95cm ø52
Anonymous
April 22, 2005 12:34:50 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Paul Rubin wrote:
> Bill Tuthill <can@spam.co> writes:
>> I was wondering why anyone would want a 18-55 DX lens,
>> especially with slow f/3.5-5.6 aperture,
>
> It's aimed at people who want cheap entry level lenses. The 18-55 is
> the full frame equivalent of a 28-90 and those were hot sellers in the
> entry level SLR segment. Point and shoot zooms are of course even
> slower, and many people who buy those SLR's really want glorified
> point-and-shoots.

Some point and shoot zooms may be slower, but not all. For example, many
of the Panasonic FZ range offer f/2.8 over the entire zoom range of 36 -
432mm.

David
Anonymous
April 22, 2005 12:34:51 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"David J Taylor" <david-taylor@blueyonder.co.not-this-bit.nor-this-part.uk> writes:
> Some point and shoot zooms may be slower, but not all. For example, many
> of the Panasonic FZ range offer f/2.8 over the entire zoom range of 36 -
> 432mm.

Whaaaaat? Are you talking about some tiny digicam zoom, with the
"35mm equivalent" focal lengths? An actual 432mm f/2.8 zoom would
have a front element over 6 inches in diameter and cost kilobucks.

Here's a review of the Nikon 400/2.8 (non-zoom) which costs about $8K:

http://www.kenrockwell.com/nikon/40028afsII.htm

Advancing technology has made it smaller than the previous version.
As the review says, "t weighs just 9.7 lbs (4.4kg). Compare this to
the 13.9 pound (6.3kg) 400mm f/2.8 AF-I!"
Anonymous
April 22, 2005 12:45:37 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Bill Tuthill <can@spam.co> writes:
> The 18-70/3.5-4.5 DX that comes with the D70 kit might be sharp
> but it has hellacious barrel distortion at much of the wide end.
> It's almost like a fisheye lens. I wouldn't want one. I'd get
> the Sigma 18-125 instead, which has more moderate distortion.
> (I posted its Pop Photo numbers a while back.)

You know, I wonder whether coming generations of digicam lenses might
be designed with lots of distortion on purpose, since accepting
distortion can make it easier to optimize other aspects of the lens,
like contrast or whatever. The distortion might be simple barrel or
pincushion distortion or it could be complex (e.g. "mustache-shaped")
as results from some aspheric elements, but in any case it can be
modelled precisely and will be the same for all units of the same
lens. These days one can use PC software to correct for distortion
but ideally, the distortion parameters should be built into the lens's
microprocessor and communicated to the camera, so the camera itself
applies the correction when making the JPEG file. The RAW file would
be uncorrected but would contain the distortion parameters as received
from the lens, so that PC software could apply the correction.
Anonymous
April 22, 2005 1:45:03 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Sheldon wrote:
> "Diane Wilson" <diane@firelily.com> wrote in message
> news:MPG.1cd1ccdd9f52e402989ac7@news-server...
>
>>In article <MPG.1cd1c96b39a7108f989ac6@news-server>, diane@firelily.com
>>says...
>>
>>>In article <0msf61phs5istlslc48308lqav1p6i0ooc@4ax.com>, Owamanga
>>><owamanga
>>>(not-this-bit)@hotmail.com> says...
>>>
>>>>On Thu, 21 Apr 2005 11:16:39 -0700, paul <paul@not.net> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>>Diane Wilson wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>>...I have my D70 configured so that
>>>>>>the EV override is on the front command wheel (without a
>>>>>>second finger pressing the EV override button), and the back
>>>>>>command wheel overrides aperture.
>>>>>
>>>>>How do you do this? P mode?
>>>>
>>>>Nah, it's all in the custom Menu - CSM 10.
>>>
>>>P mode (it might not work in Auto), CSM 10 ON, CSM 14 YES
>>>
>>>You kinda have to juggle around CSM 10 and 14; you can pick
>>>two of shutter override, aperture override, and EV override
>>>for the command dials, and depending on your shooting mode.
>>>
>>>Diane
>>>
>>
>>Oh,yes. The other trick is that a simple OFF/ON of the
>>camera will reset EV override. Resetting aperture or
>>shutter override is either by dialing back until the
>>override clears (P* indicator on control panel in P mode),
>>or a full reset.
>>
>>The EV override beats the heck out of trying to set up auto
>>bracketing on the fly.
>>
>>Diane
>
>
> I've never been happy setting up the front wheel to control EV. Every once
> in a while I'd accidentally move the wheel while carrying the camera.
> Leaving it in default mode I have to use a button and the wheel, very hard
> to do by accident.
>
> As to your original question, I think the aside from the front wheel, the
> D50 is not as fast as the D70s in continuous mode. I also doubt the glass
> for the D50 is as good or as versatile as the glass that comes with the
> D70s. I'd either get a D70 now, with all the rebates, or take a wait see.
> From what I've read the D70s doesn't offer a lot more than the D70 does now.
>
>
Talking of glass ....
After googling for reviews on Sigma's 18-125 lens I've placed an order
with B&H. The majority of personal reviews goes from " great lens for
the price " to " I've sold my Nikon 18-70 and bought the Sigma " One
person even suggested that the photos from the Sigma were equal to or
better than the kit lens. There are plenty of photos from the Sigma out
there as well .... convinced me.
Bernard
Anonymous
April 22, 2005 2:21:05 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <MPG.1cd1b75e17bb3cdb989ac5@news-server>,
Diane Wilson <diane@firelily.com> wrote:
>Switching subjects slightly, the same page shows a new
>55-200 DX lens. Any information available about that yet?
>Doesn't look like there's a separate manual focusing ring.

Nikon has information obout the new lenses on its web-site.
http://nikonimaging.com/global/products/lens/af/dx/af-s...

I doubt that they would add a A-M switch if there was no way to focus
manually :-) (I guess it is the small ring at the front).


--
That was it. Done. The faulty Monk was turned out into the desert where it
could believe what it liked, including the idea that it had been hard done
by. It was allowed to keep its horse, since horses were so cheap to make.
-- Douglas Adams in Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency
Anonymous
April 22, 2005 2:21:06 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <c02cqe9jucef6ortmns87vplf1@inews_id.stereo.hq.phicoh.net>,
philip@pch.home.cs.vu.nl says...
> In article <MPG.1cd1b75e17bb3cdb989ac5@news-server>,
> Diane Wilson <diane@firelily.com> wrote:
> >Switching subjects slightly, the same page shows a new
> >55-200 DX lens. Any information available about that yet?
> >Doesn't look like there's a separate manual focusing ring.
>
> Nikon has information obout the new lenses on its web-site.
> http://nikonimaging.com/global/products/lens/af/dx/af-s...
>
> I doubt that they would add a A-M switch if there was no way to focus
> manually :-) (I guess it is the small ring at the front).
>
>
>
Yeah, saw the switch, but that "ring" at the front (if that's
what it is) is just too narrow to be useful, and there's no
distance scale estimates, either. I'll stick with the theory
that one ring does both jobs. (And I'll stick with my 70-300
for now, unless this has clearly superior performance.)

I'm guessing that this is a really cheap (but nicely compact)
entry level lens. Looking forward to reviews, though.

Diane
Anonymous
April 23, 2005 12:07:26 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

> Yeah, saw the switch, but that "ring" at the front (if that's
> what it is) is just too narrow to be useful, and there's no
> distance scale estimates, either.

I'm a bit disappointed with the lack of a "real" focusing ring on many of
the newer digital lenses. I guess eventually the ring will vanish
altogether and you won't be able to focus manually anymore. Too bad. The
whole idea of a DSLR is lots of options. If I wanted a point and shoot I
would have bought one.
Anonymous
April 23, 2005 12:37:56 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Paul Rubin <http://phr.cx@nospam.invalid&gt; wrote:
>
> You know, I wonder whether coming generations of digicam lenses might
> be designed with lots of distortion on purpose, since accepting
> distortion can make it easier to optimize other aspects of the lens,
> like contrast or whatever.

Could be. I've heard lens design is a matter of tradeoffs, but I have
no idea what is improved by designing-in unacceptable distortion.

> The distortion might be simple barrel or
> pincushion distortion or it could be complex (e.g. "mustache-shaped")
> as results from some aspheric elements, but in any case it can be
> modelled precisely and will be the same for all units of the same lens.

Possibly. In my lens testing and usage I've found that distortion is
one of the most variable things in current (past 5-10 years) lenses.
E.g. Pop Photo, Foto and Chasseur d'Images often publish wildly varying
results for distortion. Examples on request.

> These days one can use PC software to correct for distortion
> but ideally, the distortion parameters should be built into the lens's
> microprocessor and communicated to the camera, so the camera itself
> applies the correction when [converting] the RAW file.

The Olympus 4/3 system touted this capability when first announced,
but I noticed that most of the current Olympus 4/3 lenses have visible
and sometimes objectionable distortion, so whaddya say.

----
Paul Rubin <http://phr.cx@nospam.invalid&gt; wrote:
> "David J Taylor" <david-taylor@blueyonder.co.not-this-bit.part.uk> wrote:
>> Panasonic FZ range offer f/2.8 over the entire zoom range of 36-432mm.
>
> Whaaaaat? Are you talking about some tiny digicam zoom, with the
> "35mm equivalent" focal lengths? An actual 432mm f/2.8 zoom would
> have a front element over 6 inches in diameter and cost kilobucks.

Correct, it is a 6-72mm f/2.8 lens, but the CCD sensor is so small
that its 35mm equivalent range is 38-432.
Anonymous
April 23, 2005 1:07:15 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Bill Tuthill <can@spam.co> writes:
> Could be. I've heard lens design is a matter of tradeoffs, but I have
> no idea what is improved by designing-in unacceptable distortion.

Well, look at fisheye lenses, for example. They eliminate the usual
light falloff at the edge of wide-angle lenses.

Anyway the "unacceptable" distortion is only manifest at the imaging
CCD. By the time it comes out of the camera, it's not an image at
all, it's a file that came out of a computer program crunching an
image. The computer program does all kinds of sharpening, color
interpolation, noise reduction, and whatever. The idea is that the
computer program can also remove the distortion.
Anonymous
April 23, 2005 2:16:48 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Paul Rubin wrote:
> "David J Taylor"
> <david-taylor@blueyonder.co.not-this-bit.nor-this-part.uk> writes:
>> Some point and shoot zooms may be slower, but not all. For example,
>> many of the Panasonic FZ range offer f/2.8 over the entire zoom
>> range of 36 - 432mm.
>
> Whaaaaat? Are you talking about some tiny digicam zoom, with the
> "35mm equivalent" focal lengths? An actual 432mm f/2.8 zoom would
> have a front element over 6 inches in diameter and cost kilobucks.
>
> Here's a review of the Nikon 400/2.8 (non-zoom) which costs about $8K:
>
> http://www.kenrockwell.com/nikon/40028afsII.htm
>
> Advancing technology has made it smaller than the previous version.
> As the review says, "t weighs just 9.7 lbs (4.4kg). Compare this to
> the 13.9 pound (6.3kg) 400mm f/2.8 AF-I!"

I was responding to your comment that "Point and shoot zooms are of course
even
slower" than "f/3.5-5.6 aperture", by pointing out at least one range that
did better.

Makes what you can do with a small sensor camera and a Leice lens all the
more amazing, doesn't it? Try one, you might be surprised.

Cheers,
David
Anonymous
April 23, 2005 8:13:13 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <v7mdnRWbhNZOMPTfRVn-gA@comcast.com>, sheldon@XXXXXXXXsopris.net
says...
>
> > Yeah, saw the switch, but that "ring" at the front (if that's
> > what it is) is just too narrow to be useful, and there's no
> > distance scale estimates, either.
>
> I'm a bit disappointed with the lack of a "real" focusing ring on many of
> the newer digital lenses. I guess eventually the ring will vanish
> altogether and you won't be able to focus manually anymore. Too bad. The
> whole idea of a DSLR is lots of options. If I wanted a point and shoot I
> would have bought one.
>
>
>
There are several possibilities; I'm just curious for a *real*
answer, not speculation.

One possibility is that the zoom and focus controls are built
into a single ring. It's been done before.

The fact that the lens has a switch for manual or auto focus
does suggest that it's not auto-focus only. The question is
how does manual focus work.

I wasn't exactly thrilled by the lack of an aperture ring on the
DX lenses, either, but I'm learning to live with it and not
consider it a limitation. A command wheel is fine for setting
the aperture once I got used to it. I've used P&S cameras with
a command wheel for manual focus, though, and that was pretty
lousy.

Diane
Anonymous
April 23, 2005 2:09:00 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <v7mdnRWbhNZOMPTfRVn-gA@comcast.com>,
Sheldon <sheldon@XXXXXXXXsopris.net> wrote:
>
>> Yeah, saw the switch, but that "ring" at the front (if that's
>> what it is) is just too narrow to be useful, and there's no
>> distance scale estimates, either.
>
>I'm a bit disappointed with the lack of a "real" focusing ring on many of
>the newer digital lenses. I guess eventually the ring will vanish
>altogether and you won't be able to focus manually anymore. Too bad. The
>whole idea of a DSLR is lots of options. If I wanted a point and shoot I
>would have bought one.

Well, first of all, there is no digital P&S with a sensor that is the size
of APS-C. So the D50 is likely to have better dynamic range than P&S
cameras.

Furthermore, it is just a budget lens. Don't buy it if you don't like it.
Personally, I think that 5.6 is far to slow for any lens shorter than 400mm.
But some people find low weight and high zoom ratios more important.

Of course, if you want to focus manually, nothing beats a manual focus lens.


--
That was it. Done. The faulty Monk was turned out into the desert where it
could believe what it liked, including the idea that it had been hard done
by. It was allowed to keep its horse, since horses were so cheap to make.
-- Douglas Adams in Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency
Anonymous
April 24, 2005 6:13:01 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"David J Taylor" <david-taylor@blueyonder.co.not-this-bit.nor-this-part.uk> writes:
> >> Some point and shoot zooms may be slower, but not all. For example,
> >> many of the Panasonic FZ range offer f/2.8 over the entire zoom
> >> range of 36 - 432mm.
> >
> I was responding to your comment that "Point and shoot zooms are of
> course even slower" than "f/3.5-5.6 aperture", by pointing out at
> least one range that did better.

I was talking about point and shoot 35mm film camera zooms. That's
what you have to compare 35mm SLR zooms too, and consequently DSLR zooms.
!