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Thanks to Apple

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Anonymous
April 22, 2005 3:43:58 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.mac.apps,rec.photo.digital,misc.consumers,comp.sys.mac.hardware (More info?)

I thought I would share my experience with an Applecare warranty service
request. I bought a new 1 Ghtz Powerbook a little more than two years
ago to use for my digital photography hobby and other uses. About 14
months ago when I was rushing to catch a flight, my Powerbook flew out
of its case and hit a concrete curb, then bounced two or three times.
When this happened, my heart sank. The slot for the Superdrive was bent
so badly, I could not insert any discs into it and the case sustained a
lot of other damage. The entire case was bent. As a result, my Powerbook
would not close properly. I had to push the lid down much harder than
normal to get it to close.

I used a screwdriver to pry the SuperDrive slot open and when I powered
up my Powerbook, it worked fine. I was relieved, to say the least. Last
Saturday, I took a flight from Philadelphia to Las Vegas. My Powerbook
worked fine on the plane. When I started my Powerbook at the hotel where
I stayed at in Las Vegas, it started to wig out. The display would
severely pixelate and go white on me. If I jiggled the Powerbook lid, it
would work again. Than on Sunday, the display died on me completely.

On Monday, I attended a convention all day, but on Tuesday, I took my
Powerbook over to the Apple store in the Fashion Show Mall. A Mac Genius
looked at it and he said the damage from being dropped may have caused
the motherboard to slowly fail over time. He filled out the paperwork to
have my Powerbook sent away to be repaired. I left instructions to call
me if the repairs were out of warranty, in which case, I would have
probably declined the repair work and bought a new Powerbook. I have a
three year AppleCare warranty on my Powerbook, but I did not expect it
to cover this repair because of my having dropped it. The damage looked
to be well beyond normal wear and tear.

Much to my surprise, when I arrived home this afternoon, my Powerbook
was there waiting for me! It was completely fixed, as good as new for
free! Not only that, but Apple replaced the damaged case! My Powerbook
that previously had several scratches and dents in it now looks and
works as good as new!

I am thrilled with the way Apple handled my service request. Apple
went way beyond the call of duty and I wish to thank Apple publicly.
That's why I am posting this message on these newsgroups.

Thanks Apple for a job well done! Thanks also to DHL for delivering my
Powerbook to me so quickly.

More about : apple

Anonymous
April 22, 2005 7:19:52 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.mac.apps,rec.photo.digital,misc.consumers,comp.sys.mac.hardware (More info?)

Stan Horwitz wrote:
> I thought I would share my experience with an Applecare warranty service
> request. I bought a new 1 Ghtz Powerbook a little more than two years
> ago to use for my digital photography hobby and other uses. About 14
> months ago when I was rushing to catch a flight, my Powerbook flew out
> of its case and hit a concrete curb, then bounced two or three times.
> When this happened, my heart sank. The slot for the Superdrive was bent
> so badly, I could not insert any discs into it and the case sustained a
> lot of other damage. The entire case was bent. As a result, my Powerbook
> would not close properly. I had to push the lid down much harder than
> normal to get it to close.
>
> I used a screwdriver to pry the SuperDrive slot open and when I powered
> up my Powerbook, it worked fine. I was relieved, to say the least. Last
> Saturday, I took a flight from Philadelphia to Las Vegas. My Powerbook
> worked fine on the plane. When I started my Powerbook at the hotel where
> I stayed at in Las Vegas, it started to wig out. The display would
> severely pixelate and go white on me. If I jiggled the Powerbook lid, it
> would work again. Than on Sunday, the display died on me completely.
>
> On Monday, I attended a convention all day, but on Tuesday, I took my
> Powerbook over to the Apple store in the Fashion Show Mall. A Mac Genius
> looked at it and he said the damage from being dropped may have caused
> the motherboard to slowly fail over time. He filled out the paperwork to
> have my Powerbook sent away to be repaired. I left instructions to call
> me if the repairs were out of warranty, in which case, I would have
> probably declined the repair work and bought a new Powerbook. I have a
> three year AppleCare warranty on my Powerbook, but I did not expect it
> to cover this repair because of my having dropped it. The damage looked
> to be well beyond normal wear and tear.
>
> Much to my surprise, when I arrived home this afternoon, my Powerbook
> was there waiting for me! It was completely fixed, as good as new for
> free! Not only that, but Apple replaced the damaged case! My Powerbook
> that previously had several scratches and dents in it now looks and
> works as good as new!
>
> I am thrilled with the way Apple handled my service request. Apple
> went way beyond the call of duty and I wish to thank Apple publicly.
> That's why I am posting this message on these newsgroups.
>
> Thanks Apple for a job well done! Thanks also to DHL for delivering my
> Powerbook to me so quickly.

Great service! My kudos to Apple for customer care!
So now you are going to rush out and buy a Dell,right? Grin.
Enjoy the 'new' computer.


--
Ron Hunter rphunter@charter.net
Anonymous
April 22, 2005 11:08:19 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.mac.apps,rec.photo.digital,misc.consumers,comp.sys.mac.hardware (More info?)

In article <stan-3D0487.11435822042005@news.giganews.com>,
Stan Horwitz <stan@temple.edu> wrote:

> Thanks Apple for a job well done!

Your $15,000 check is in the mail! :) 
Thanks,
Steve J.
Related resources
Anonymous
April 23, 2005 1:28:20 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.mac.apps,rec.photo.digital,misc.consumers,comp.sys.mac.hardware (More info?)

On Fri, 22 Apr 2005 14:43:58 -0400, Stan Horwitz wrote:
> I thought I would share my experience with an Applecare warranty service
> request. I bought a new 1 Ghtz Powerbook a little more than two years
> ago ...
> ...snipped....
>
> Much to my surprise, when I arrived home this afternoon, my Powerbook
> was there waiting for me!

I have a good story too, only involving a glass of water spilling into the
keyboard and flooding, and then shorting many internal components. I took the
case apart myself and you could clearly see where things had arced.

I sent it off to Apple on a Monday, overnight, fully expecting to pay for a
new motherboard. They received it Tuesday and shipped it Wednesday, and I got
it back Thursday. They said they also added a new hinge and bezel for the
display.

Meanwhile my neighbor's Dell ... with additional warranty ... had been
who-knows-where for two weeks.
Anonymous
April 23, 2005 3:30:58 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.mac.apps,rec.photo.digital,misc.consumers,comp.sys.mac.hardware (More info?)

Good to hear the kudos, Stan. We often hear only the bad and none of
the good.

Phil

Stan Horwitz wrote:
> I thought I would share my experience with an Applecare warranty service
> request. I bought a new 1 Ghtz Powerbook a little more than two years
> ago to use for my digital photography hobby and other uses. About 14
> months ago when I was rushing to catch a flight, my Powerbook flew out
> of its case and hit a concrete curb, then bounced two or three times.
> When this happened, my heart sank. The slot for the Superdrive was bent
> so badly, I could not insert any discs into it and the case sustained a
> lot of other damage. The entire case was bent. As a result, my Powerbook
> would not close properly. I had to push the lid down much harder than
> normal to get it to close.
>
> I used a screwdriver to pry the SuperDrive slot open and when I powered
> up my Powerbook, it worked fine. I was relieved, to say the least. Last
> Saturday, I took a flight from Philadelphia to Las Vegas. My Powerbook
> worked fine on the plane. When I started my Powerbook at the hotel where
> I stayed at in Las Vegas, it started to wig out. The display would
> severely pixelate and go white on me. If I jiggled the Powerbook lid, it
> would work again. Than on Sunday, the display died on me completely.
>
> On Monday, I attended a convention all day, but on Tuesday, I took my
> Powerbook over to the Apple store in the Fashion Show Mall. A Mac Genius
> looked at it and he said the damage from being dropped may have caused
> the motherboard to slowly fail over time. He filled out the paperwork to
> have my Powerbook sent away to be repaired. I left instructions to call
> me if the repairs were out of warranty, in which case, I would have
> probably declined the repair work and bought a new Powerbook. I have a
> three year AppleCare warranty on my Powerbook, but I did not expect it
> to cover this repair because of my having dropped it. The damage looked
> to be well beyond normal wear and tear.
>
> Much to my surprise, when I arrived home this afternoon, my Powerbook
> was there waiting for me! It was completely fixed, as good as new for
> free! Not only that, but Apple replaced the damaged case! My Powerbook
> that previously had several scratches and dents in it now looks and
> works as good as new!
>
> I am thrilled with the way Apple handled my service request. Apple
> went way beyond the call of duty and I wish to thank Apple publicly.
> That's why I am posting this message on these newsgroups.
>
> Thanks Apple for a job well done! Thanks also to DHL for delivering my
> Powerbook to me so quickly.
April 23, 2005 5:37:25 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.mac.apps,rec.photo.digital,misc.consumers,comp.sys.mac.hardware (More info?)

On Fri, 22 Apr 2005 18:28:20 -0700, Tim Murray wrote
(in article <0001HW.BE8F1CF40002B33DF03355B0@newsgroups.bellsouth.net>):

> I sent it off to Apple on a Monday, overnight, fully expecting to pay for a
> new motherboard. They received it Tuesday and shipped it Wednesday, and I got

> it back Thursday. They said they also added a new hinge and bezel for the
> display.

Also under AppleCare coverage?
--
Please, no "Go Google this" replies. I wouldn't
ask a question here if I hadn't done that already.

DaveC
me@privacy.net
This is an invalid return address
Please reply in the news group
Anonymous
April 23, 2005 5:37:26 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.mac.apps,rec.photo.digital,misc.consumers,comp.sys.mac.hardware (More info?)

On Fri, 22 Apr 2005 21:37:25 -0400, DaveC wrote:
> On Fri, 22 Apr 2005 18:28:20 -0700, Tim Murray wrote
> (in article <0001HW.BE8F1CF40002B33DF03355B0@newsgroups.bellsouth.net>):
>
>> I sent it off to Apple on a Monday, overnight, fully expecting to pay for
>> a new motherboard. They received it Tuesday and shipped it Wednesday, and
>> I got it back Thursday. They said they also added a new hinge and bezel
>> for the display.
>
> Also under AppleCare coverage?
>

Indeed.
April 23, 2005 6:41:48 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Fri, 22 Apr 2005 11:43:58 -0700
In message <stan-3D0487.11435822042005@news.giganews.com>
Stan Horwitz <stan@temple.edu> wrote:

> I thought I would share my experience with an
> Applecare warranty service request. I bought
> a new 1 Ghtz Powerbook a little more than two
> years ago to use for my digital photography
> hobby and other uses.
> <SNIP good Apple experiance>

(COUNTERPOINT)

Last year I purchased a 12" Powerbook directly from
Apple for $2123US with 1/2 GIG RAM and an 80 GIG HD
for the same reason; to support my often mobile
digital photography hobby.

It arrived with a defective pixel; not a good feature
for mobile photographic purposes.

I went to the nearest Apple Store and an Apple Genius
informed me that selecting a larger HD "customized"
the Powerbook and neither the store or Apple would
swap it out or take it back. Customization voided the
satisfaction guarantee.

"You can send it in for evaluation, but
they will not replace or fix the screen."

There were no warnings on the order page stating that
selecting some options would void the guarantee.
Paying a worker in Mexico to pick a hard drive from
BOX 3 instead of BOX 1 is a customization.

NO return. NO satisfaction guarantee. NO fix.

Buyer be aware.

Jeff
Anonymous
April 23, 2005 12:30:28 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <aq7j61lgfsm9cl2p3ni8fjuc5hhqp14rpf@4ax.com>, Confused
<somebody@someplace.somenet> wrote:

> It arrived with a defective pixel; not a good feature
> for mobile photographic purposes.
>
> I went to the nearest Apple Store and an Apple Genius
> informed me that selecting a larger HD "customized"
> the Powerbook and neither the store or Apple would
> swap it out or take it back. Customization voided the
> satisfaction guarantee.

Actually, there are two issues at work here. Ordering BTO (Build To
Order) does indeed negate the somewhat-informal "satisfaction
guarantee"; once you've done that, the computer can't be described by
one of the standard part numbers and so can't go back into inventory.

Your real issue is the display, though. If I recall correctly, the
Apple standard to declare a laptop screen defective is five bad pixels
total, or three within the same area of the screen. One or two bad
pixels is a "manufacturing variance" not a warrantable defect.

Both of these policies are common in the industry, though as yields
increase some manufacturers are getting better about bad LCD's.

Advice 1: Keep bugging them. If you make enough noise, and go
immediately to customer RELATIONS, instead of customer SERVICE, you'll
usually get an exception made. Usually. In your case, since the issue
came up a year ago, you're probably out of luck.

Advice 2: With ANY product that has an LCD, buy locally and demand to
examine in advance the exact one you'll be taking home. You miss out on
some good mail order deals, but you know you're getting a good screen.
Anonymous
April 23, 2005 7:59:46 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.mac.apps,rec.photo.digital,misc.consumers,comp.sys.mac.hardware (More info?)

In article <I%cae.5289$Gq6.3208@fe02.lga>,
Ron Hunter <rphunter@charter.net> wrote:

> Stan Horwitz wrote:
> > I thought I would share my experience with an Applecare warranty service
> > request. I bought a new 1 Ghtz Powerbook a little more than two years
> > ago to use for my digital photography hobby and other uses. About 14
> > months ago when I was rushing to catch a flight, my Powerbook flew out
> > of its case and hit a concrete curb, then bounced two or three times.
> > When this happened, my heart sank. The slot for the Superdrive was bent
> > so badly, I could not insert any discs into it and the case sustained a
> > lot of other damage. The entire case was bent. As a result, my Powerbook
> > would not close properly. I had to push the lid down much harder than
> > normal to get it to close.
> >
> > I used a screwdriver to pry the SuperDrive slot open and when I powered
> > up my Powerbook, it worked fine. I was relieved, to say the least. Last
> > Saturday, I took a flight from Philadelphia to Las Vegas. My Powerbook
> > worked fine on the plane. When I started my Powerbook at the hotel where
> > I stayed at in Las Vegas, it started to wig out. The display would
> > severely pixelate and go white on me. If I jiggled the Powerbook lid, it
> > would work again. Than on Sunday, the display died on me completely.
> >
> > On Monday, I attended a convention all day, but on Tuesday, I took my
> > Powerbook over to the Apple store in the Fashion Show Mall. A Mac Genius
> > looked at it and he said the damage from being dropped may have caused
> > the motherboard to slowly fail over time. He filled out the paperwork to
> > have my Powerbook sent away to be repaired. I left instructions to call
> > me if the repairs were out of warranty, in which case, I would have
> > probably declined the repair work and bought a new Powerbook. I have a
> > three year AppleCare warranty on my Powerbook, but I did not expect it
> > to cover this repair because of my having dropped it. The damage looked
> > to be well beyond normal wear and tear.
> >
> > Much to my surprise, when I arrived home this afternoon, my Powerbook
> > was there waiting for me! It was completely fixed, as good as new for
> > free! Not only that, but Apple replaced the damaged case! My Powerbook
> > that previously had several scratches and dents in it now looks and
> > works as good as new!
> >
> > I am thrilled with the way Apple handled my service request. Apple
> > went way beyond the call of duty and I wish to thank Apple publicly.
> > That's why I am posting this message on these newsgroups.
> >
> > Thanks Apple for a job well done! Thanks also to DHL for delivering my
> > Powerbook to me so quickly.
>
> Great service! My kudos to Apple for customer care!
> So now you are going to rush out and buy a Dell,right? Grin.
> Enjoy the 'new' computer.

Well, at least they are trying hard with the new MacMini. $500 for a new
computer and all you need is a keyboard, mouse and display.
Anonymous
April 23, 2005 7:59:47 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.mac.apps,rec.photo.digital,misc.consumers,comp.sys.mac.hardware (More info?)

In article <anyone4tennis-4A4F8E.15594623042005@newssv.kcn.ne.jp>,
Stewy <anyone4tennis@hotmail.com> wrote:

> In article <I%cae.5289$Gq6.3208@fe02.lga>,
> Ron Hunter <rphunter@charter.net> wrote:
>
> > Stan Horwitz wrote:
> > > I thought I would share my experience with an Applecare warranty service
> > > request. I bought a new 1 Ghtz Powerbook a little more than two years
> > > ago to use for my digital photography hobby and other uses. About 14
> > > months ago when I was rushing to catch a flight, my Powerbook flew out
> > > of its case and hit a concrete curb, then bounced two or three times.
> > > When this happened, my heart sank. The slot for the Superdrive was bent
> > > so badly, I could not insert any discs into it and the case sustained a
> > > lot of other damage. The entire case was bent. As a result, my Powerbook
> > > would not close properly. I had to push the lid down much harder than
> > > normal to get it to close.
> > >
> > > I used a screwdriver to pry the SuperDrive slot open and when I powered
> > > up my Powerbook, it worked fine. I was relieved, to say the least. Last
> > > Saturday, I took a flight from Philadelphia to Las Vegas. My Powerbook
> > > worked fine on the plane. When I started my Powerbook at the hotel where
> > > I stayed at in Las Vegas, it started to wig out. The display would
> > > severely pixelate and go white on me. If I jiggled the Powerbook lid, it
> > > would work again. Than on Sunday, the display died on me completely.
> > >
> > > On Monday, I attended a convention all day, but on Tuesday, I took my
> > > Powerbook over to the Apple store in the Fashion Show Mall. A Mac Genius
> > > looked at it and he said the damage from being dropped may have caused
> > > the motherboard to slowly fail over time. He filled out the paperwork to
> > > have my Powerbook sent away to be repaired. I left instructions to call
> > > me if the repairs were out of warranty, in which case, I would have
> > > probably declined the repair work and bought a new Powerbook. I have a
> > > three year AppleCare warranty on my Powerbook, but I did not expect it
> > > to cover this repair because of my having dropped it. The damage looked
> > > to be well beyond normal wear and tear.
> > >
> > > Much to my surprise, when I arrived home this afternoon, my Powerbook
> > > was there waiting for me! It was completely fixed, as good as new for
> > > free! Not only that, but Apple replaced the damaged case! My Powerbook
> > > that previously had several scratches and dents in it now looks and
> > > works as good as new!
> > >
> > > I am thrilled with the way Apple handled my service request. Apple
> > > went way beyond the call of duty and I wish to thank Apple publicly.
> > > That's why I am posting this message on these newsgroups.
> > >
> > > Thanks Apple for a job well done! Thanks also to DHL for delivering my
> > > Powerbook to me so quickly.
> >
> > Great service! My kudos to Apple for customer care!
> > So now you are going to rush out and buy a Dell,right? Grin.
> > Enjoy the 'new' computer.
>
> Well, at least they are trying hard with the new MacMini. $500 for a new
> computer and all you need is a keyboard, mouse and display.

A friend of mine has a Mac mini. He bought it to supplement his old G4
and he loves it.
Anonymous
April 23, 2005 7:59:47 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.mac.apps,rec.photo.digital,misc.consumers,comp.sys.mac.hardware (More info?)

Stewy wrote:
> In article <I%cae.5289$Gq6.3208@fe02.lga>,
> Ron Hunter <rphunter@charter.net> wrote:
>
>
>>Stan Horwitz wrote:
>>
>>>I thought I would share my experience with an Applecare warranty service
>>>request. I bought a new 1 Ghtz Powerbook a little more than two years
>>>ago to use for my digital photography hobby and other uses. About 14
>>>months ago when I was rushing to catch a flight, my Powerbook flew out
>>>of its case and hit a concrete curb, then bounced two or three times.
>>>When this happened, my heart sank. The slot for the Superdrive was bent
>>>so badly, I could not insert any discs into it and the case sustained a
>>>lot of other damage. The entire case was bent. As a result, my Powerbook
>>>would not close properly. I had to push the lid down much harder than
>>>normal to get it to close.
>>>
>>>I used a screwdriver to pry the SuperDrive slot open and when I powered
>>>up my Powerbook, it worked fine. I was relieved, to say the least. Last
>>>Saturday, I took a flight from Philadelphia to Las Vegas. My Powerbook
>>>worked fine on the plane. When I started my Powerbook at the hotel where
>>>I stayed at in Las Vegas, it started to wig out. The display would
>>>severely pixelate and go white on me. If I jiggled the Powerbook lid, it
>>>would work again. Than on Sunday, the display died on me completely.
>>>
>>>On Monday, I attended a convention all day, but on Tuesday, I took my
>>>Powerbook over to the Apple store in the Fashion Show Mall. A Mac Genius
>>>looked at it and he said the damage from being dropped may have caused
>>>the motherboard to slowly fail over time. He filled out the paperwork to
>>>have my Powerbook sent away to be repaired. I left instructions to call
>>>me if the repairs were out of warranty, in which case, I would have
>>>probably declined the repair work and bought a new Powerbook. I have a
>>>three year AppleCare warranty on my Powerbook, but I did not expect it
>>>to cover this repair because of my having dropped it. The damage looked
>>>to be well beyond normal wear and tear.
>>>
>>>Much to my surprise, when I arrived home this afternoon, my Powerbook
>>>was there waiting for me! It was completely fixed, as good as new for
>>>free! Not only that, but Apple replaced the damaged case! My Powerbook
>>>that previously had several scratches and dents in it now looks and
>>>works as good as new!
>>>
>>>I am thrilled with the way Apple handled my service request. Apple
>>>went way beyond the call of duty and I wish to thank Apple publicly.
>>>That's why I am posting this message on these newsgroups.
>>>
>>>Thanks Apple for a job well done! Thanks also to DHL for delivering my
>>>Powerbook to me so quickly.
>>
>>Great service! My kudos to Apple for customer care!
>>So now you are going to rush out and buy a Dell,right? Grin.
>>Enjoy the 'new' computer.
>
>
> Well, at least they are trying hard with the new MacMini. $500 for a new
> computer and all you need is a keyboard, mouse and display.

Yes, while Dell advertises a computer, printer, monitor, keyboard, and
mouse for less. Still, his experience was a positive one, and the
company should be recognized for pleasing one of their customers.


--
Ron Hunter rphunter@charter.net
Anonymous
April 23, 2005 7:59:48 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.mac.apps,rec.photo.digital,misc.consumers,comp.sys.mac.hardware (More info?)

Stan Horwitz wrote:
> In article <anyone4tennis-4A4F8E.15594623042005@newssv.kcn.ne.jp>,
> Stewy <anyone4tennis@hotmail.com> wrote:
>
>
>>In article <I%cae.5289$Gq6.3208@fe02.lga>,
>> Ron Hunter <rphunter@charter.net> wrote:
>>
>>
>>>Stan Horwitz wrote:
>>>
>>>>I thought I would share my experience with an Applecare warranty service
>>>>request. I bought a new 1 Ghtz Powerbook a little more than two years
>>>>ago to use for my digital photography hobby and other uses. About 14
>>>>months ago when I was rushing to catch a flight, my Powerbook flew out
>>>>of its case and hit a concrete curb, then bounced two or three times.
>>>>When this happened, my heart sank. The slot for the Superdrive was bent
>>>>so badly, I could not insert any discs into it and the case sustained a
>>>>lot of other damage. The entire case was bent. As a result, my Powerbook
>>>>would not close properly. I had to push the lid down much harder than
>>>>normal to get it to close.
>>>>
>>>>I used a screwdriver to pry the SuperDrive slot open and when I powered
>>>>up my Powerbook, it worked fine. I was relieved, to say the least. Last
>>>>Saturday, I took a flight from Philadelphia to Las Vegas. My Powerbook
>>>>worked fine on the plane. When I started my Powerbook at the hotel where
>>>>I stayed at in Las Vegas, it started to wig out. The display would
>>>>severely pixelate and go white on me. If I jiggled the Powerbook lid, it
>>>>would work again. Than on Sunday, the display died on me completely.
>>>>
>>>>On Monday, I attended a convention all day, but on Tuesday, I took my
>>>>Powerbook over to the Apple store in the Fashion Show Mall. A Mac Genius
>>>>looked at it and he said the damage from being dropped may have caused
>>>>the motherboard to slowly fail over time. He filled out the paperwork to
>>>>have my Powerbook sent away to be repaired. I left instructions to call
>>>>me if the repairs were out of warranty, in which case, I would have
>>>>probably declined the repair work and bought a new Powerbook. I have a
>>>>three year AppleCare warranty on my Powerbook, but I did not expect it
>>>>to cover this repair because of my having dropped it. The damage looked
>>>>to be well beyond normal wear and tear.
>>>>
>>>>Much to my surprise, when I arrived home this afternoon, my Powerbook
>>>>was there waiting for me! It was completely fixed, as good as new for
>>>>free! Not only that, but Apple replaced the damaged case! My Powerbook
>>>>that previously had several scratches and dents in it now looks and
>>>>works as good as new!
>>>>
>>>>I am thrilled with the way Apple handled my service request. Apple
>>>>went way beyond the call of duty and I wish to thank Apple publicly.
>>>>That's why I am posting this message on these newsgroups.
>>>>
>>>>Thanks Apple for a job well done! Thanks also to DHL for delivering my
>>>>Powerbook to me so quickly.
>>>
>>>Great service! My kudos to Apple for customer care!
>>>So now you are going to rush out and buy a Dell,right? Grin.
>>>Enjoy the 'new' computer.
>>
>>Well, at least they are trying hard with the new MacMini. $500 for a new
>>computer and all you need is a keyboard, mouse and display.
>
>
> A friend of mine has a Mac mini. He bought it to supplement his old G4
> and he loves it.

If one has an older machine, and just wants to replace the old one with
a newer machine (smaller, most likely) with the current OS, and doesn't
need the peripherals, then it isn't a bad deal. For a new user, it
probably isn't such a great deal.


--
Ron Hunter rphunter@charter.net
Anonymous
April 23, 2005 7:59:49 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.mac.apps,rec.photo.digital,misc.consumers,comp.sys.mac.hardware (More info?)

In article <tOtae.9169$Gq6.7226@fe02.lga>,
Ron Hunter <rphunter@charter.net> wrote:
>
> If one has an older machine, and just wants to replace the old one with
> a newer machine (smaller, most likely) with the current OS, and doesn't
> need the peripherals, then it isn't a bad deal. For a new user, it
> probably isn't such a great deal.

Again, it really depends on one's needs. For me, a Mac mini would be a
terrible choice. I have a dual processor 2.5Ghtz G5 machine at home, and
I already put it through its paces with Photoshop. Another friend of
mine just told me today that he got a Mac mini for home. It replaces an
original iMac and he and his family are thrilled with it.
Anonymous
April 23, 2005 8:07:03 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.mac.apps,rec.photo.digital,misc.consumers,comp.sys.mac.hardware (More info?)

In article <1Ntae.9160$Gq6.6757@fe02.lga>,
Ron Hunter <rphunter@charter.net> wrote:

> What I don't understand is why Apple users feel obligated to denigrate
> the computers others have chosen. If you are happy with yours, and I am
> happy with mine, why do you feel you have to insult me by implying I am
> somehow mentally defective because I didn't choose the computer you did?
> Buy what you like, use it in happiness, and let others do the same.

Except of course, you've also said:

"I don't like Apple (the company, or its leadership). I don't like the
traditional pattern of a product that is underpowered, and overpriced,
and proprietary to the core. I don't like the way the Mac GUI works,
or the 'locked in' attitude expressed by Apple. In short, I don't like
Macs, Apple, or the way it does things."

"Macs are vastly over priced at any performance level. Fact, you can
ignore it all you wish, but it won't change the facts."

Of course, you then go on the say things like the "use it in happiness"
stuff above, but once you've told someone that they've bought something
that's "underpowered and overpriced," you're not going to get them to
believe you very easily.
Anonymous
April 23, 2005 8:11:06 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.mac.apps,rec.photo.digital,misc.consumers,comp.sys.mac.hardware (More info?)

Stan Horwitz wrote:
> In article <tOtae.9169$Gq6.7226@fe02.lga>,
> Ron Hunter <rphunter@charter.net> wrote:
>
>>If one has an older machine, and just wants to replace the old one with
>>a newer machine (smaller, most likely) with the current OS, and doesn't
>>need the peripherals, then it isn't a bad deal. For a new user, it
>>probably isn't such a great deal.
>
>
> Again, it really depends on one's needs. For me, a Mac mini would be a
> terrible choice. I have a dual processor 2.5Ghtz G5 machine at home, and
> I already put it through its paces with Photoshop. Another friend of
> mine just told me today that he got a Mac mini for home. It replaces an
> original iMac and he and his family are thrilled with it.
Like I said, if you already have suitable monitor/keyboard/mouse, etc.,
it can be a good way to upgrade to the latest OS, and a newer processor.
For a starter, I suspect most people would like to buy the whole
system, already more or less configured.


--
Ron Hunter rphunter@charter.net
Anonymous
April 23, 2005 8:26:12 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.mac.apps,rec.photo.digital,misc.consumers,comp.sys.mac.hardware (More info?)

In article <lHtae.9130$Gq6.2193@fe02.lga>, Ron Hunter
<rphunter@charter.net> wrote:

> > Well, at least they are trying hard with the new MacMini. $500 for a new
> > computer and all you need is a keyboard, mouse and display.
>
> Yes, while Dell advertises a computer, printer, monitor, keyboard, and
> mouse for less.

"A computer," yes. A comparable one, I'm not so sure. Let's look at
the Dimension 2400, their least expensive system available online, and
compare it to a basic Mini:


The $299 Dell system includes a super-slow Celeron 2.4GHz processor.
(We have a 2.7GHz Celeron at work in a Compaq -- it's glacial. My
800MHz iMac blows the doors off it.) But we'll leave it as-is; both
manufactuers offer faster chips for more money.

The Mac includes a Combo drive, a DVD-ROM and CD-RW in one unit. Dell
doesn't even offer one. The best they can do is two separate drives (a
DVD-ROM and a CD-RW), and that's a $99 upgrade.

Dell has only a 90-day warranty. If you want the 1-year warranty to
match the Mac, it's another $19.

Since the Mini doesn't include a monitor, we'll subtract the cheapie
CRT from the Dell at $50, per their web site.

Size of hard drive and RAM included are identical between the two.
Modem and 10/100 Ethernet are included in both. The Mac includes music
and CD-burning software. As does the Dell. Neither includes a floppy
drive.


The Mac includes the full iPhoto 5, while the Dell includes a crippled
version of its photo program. To get their "deluxe" version and add
archiving and red-eye removal, Dell wants another $29.

The Mac includes Quicken, while it's another $50 for MS Money on the
Dell. The Mac includes AppleWorks, while the Dell includes no basic
productivity software whatsoever. Microsoft Works is another $50 at
the store.


The Dell includes a keyboard and mouse, so we'll add Apple's set at
$58. Obviously you can get a set cheaper in a store, but we're
sticking with what you can get from the manufacturers for this
comparison.

The Dell uses shared video memory, not the dedicated memory the Mini
uses. That means a much slower video subsystem, and that RAM it
"shares" is thus unusable by the system. Your 256MB becomes 192MB of
RAM when the video steals its 64MB, making the RAM upgrade almost a
necessity, or a new video card. The Mac has AGP video with a Radeon
9200 chipset, and its own dedicated RAM.

The Mac also offers a digital video connection (DVI), which will make a
flat-panel look MUCH crisper than the VGA connection the Dell offers.
So to really make it comparable, we're going to have to add a basic ATI
video card with DVI to the Dell. That's $79 for the Radeon 9250.
That's the cheapest ATI branded PCI card I could find with DVI -- the
Dell doesn't have an AGP slot.

Dell includes Windows XP Home edition, which is loaded with irritating
limitations. Want XP Pro, the full OS? That's not a build-to-order
option from Dell on the 2400, despite the banner at the top of every
page that they recommend XP Pro. You'll have to buy it separately, and
it's $199 for the upgrade version. On sale now at CompUSA for $149, so
we'll use that figure.

Firewire is not included in the Dell. To add that, a PCI card is $21
for the cheapest no-name I could find on CompUSA's web site. Dell
doesn't offer one.

Both are offering free shipping.

Dell is including a free printer valued at $53, Apple isn't for the
moment, so we'll knock that off the Dell's price

Adding it up, we're looking at $690 for a Dell with specs comparable to
the Mac Mini, at $557 with the keyboard and mouse.


Which really looks like the better deal for a *comparable* machine?
The Dell looks like it's $133 *more* expensive to me. It only looks
less expensive at first glance because it's stripped to the bone. Make
it comparable to the Mini in functionality, and it's 24% *more*
expensive.

--
Garner R. Miller
Clifton Park, NY =USA=
Anonymous
April 23, 2005 9:09:36 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.mac.apps,rec.photo.digital,misc.consumers,comp.sys.mac.hardware (More info?)

On Sat, 23 Apr 2005 16:26:12 GMT, Garner Miller <garner@netstreet.net>
wrote:

>In article <lHtae.9130$Gq6.2193@fe02.lga>, Ron Hunter
><rphunter@charter.net> wrote:
>
>> > Well, at least they are trying hard with the new MacMini. $500 for a new
>> > computer and all you need is a keyboard, mouse and display.
>>
>> Yes, while Dell advertises a computer, printer, monitor, keyboard, and
>> mouse for less.
>
>"A computer," yes. A comparable one, I'm not so sure. Let's look at
>the Dimension 2400, their least expensive system available online, and
>compare it to a basic Mini:
>
>
>The $299 Dell system includes a super-slow Celeron 2.4GHz processor.
>(We have a 2.7GHz Celeron at work in a Compaq -- it's glacial. My
>800MHz iMac blows the doors off it.) But we'll leave it as-is; both
>manufactuers offer faster chips for more money.
>
>The Mac includes a Combo drive, a DVD-ROM and CD-RW in one unit. Dell
>doesn't even offer one. The best they can do is two separate drives (a
>DVD-ROM and a CD-RW), and that's a $99 upgrade.
>

So, what do you do when you need to copy a CD on your Mac? Find
someone smart enough to buy a system with both a source and a
destination drive?
Anonymous
April 23, 2005 9:09:37 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.mac.apps,rec.photo.digital,misc.consumers,comp.sys.mac.hardware (More info?)

Bob Ward wrote:
> On Sat, 23 Apr 2005 16:26:12 GMT, Garner Miller <garner@netstreet.net>
> wrote:
>
>
>>In article <lHtae.9130$Gq6.2193@fe02.lga>, Ron Hunter
>><rphunter@charter.net> wrote:
>>
>>
>>>>Well, at least they are trying hard with the new MacMini. $500 for a new
>>>>computer and all you need is a keyboard, mouse and display.
>>>
>>>Yes, while Dell advertises a computer, printer, monitor, keyboard, and
>>>mouse for less.
>>
>>"A computer," yes. A comparable one, I'm not so sure. Let's look at
>>the Dimension 2400, their least expensive system available online, and
>>compare it to a basic Mini:
>>
>>
>>The $299 Dell system includes a super-slow Celeron 2.4GHz processor.
>>(We have a 2.7GHz Celeron at work in a Compaq -- it's glacial. My
>>800MHz iMac blows the doors off it.) But we'll leave it as-is; both
>>manufactuers offer faster chips for more money.
>>
>>The Mac includes a Combo drive, a DVD-ROM and CD-RW in one unit. Dell
>>doesn't even offer one. The best they can do is two separate drives (a
>>DVD-ROM and a CD-RW), and that's a $99 upgrade.
>>
>
>
> So, what do you do when you need to copy a CD on your Mac? Find
> someone smart enough to buy a system with both a source and a
> destination drive?
>
>
No, you just tell it to copy the CD. You load the source, read the CD
onto the HD, then remove the source, and write the data to the new CD. Duh!

BTW, just about every PC I have seen advertised includes a DVD-ROM and
CD-RW, even the pretty basic ones.I can't imagine that Dell doesn't. If
not, that is their error.


--
Ron Hunter rphunter@charter.net
Anonymous
April 23, 2005 9:09:37 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.mac.apps,rec.photo.digital,misc.consumers,comp.sys.mac.hardware (More info?)

In article <s50l611ae5ruousfdnopn0uib6t10amspv@4ax.com>,
Bob Ward <bobward@verizon.net> wrote:

> On Sat, 23 Apr 2005 16:26:12 GMT, Garner Miller <garner@netstreet.net>
> wrote:
>
> >In article <lHtae.9130$Gq6.2193@fe02.lga>, Ron Hunter
> ><rphunter@charter.net> wrote:
> >
> >> > Well, at least they are trying hard with the new MacMini. $500 for a new
> >> > computer and all you need is a keyboard, mouse and display.
> >>
> >> Yes, while Dell advertises a computer, printer, monitor, keyboard, and
> >> mouse for less.
> >
> >"A computer," yes. A comparable one, I'm not so sure. Let's look at
> >the Dimension 2400, their least expensive system available online, and
> >compare it to a basic Mini:
> >
> >
> >The $299 Dell system includes a super-slow Celeron 2.4GHz processor.
> >(We have a 2.7GHz Celeron at work in a Compaq -- it's glacial. My
> >800MHz iMac blows the doors off it.) But we'll leave it as-is; both
> >manufactuers offer faster chips for more money.
> >
> >The Mac includes a Combo drive, a DVD-ROM and CD-RW in one unit. Dell
> >doesn't even offer one. The best they can do is two separate drives (a
> >DVD-ROM and a CD-RW), and that's a $99 upgrade.
> >
>
> So, what do you do when you need to copy a CD on your Mac? Find
> someone smart enough to buy a system with both a source and a
> destination drive?

If enough hard drive space is available, you would copy the CD (or a
disk image) to the hard drive, then eject the original CD, put in a
blank writable CD and copy the disk image to the blank media. Its not
a big deal. Than again, how many people ever need to do such a thing?
Anonymous
April 23, 2005 9:36:16 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.mac.apps,rec.photo.digital,misc.consumers,comp.sys.mac.hardware (More info?)

In article <s50l611ae5ruousfdnopn0uib6t10amspv@4ax.com>, Bob Ward
<bobward@verizon.net> wrote:

> So, what do you do when you need to copy a CD on your Mac? Find
> someone smart enough to buy a system with both a source and a
> destination drive?

You put the disk in, hit "copy," it makes an image and ejects it, then
you put a blank in, and it writes what it read earlier, as many times
as you need. Since I make about 3 straight copies a year, if that, I
don't feel the need to have two separate CD drives, one to read and one
to write. (And if that changes, I can always add one later.)

--
Garner R. Miller
Clifton Park, NY =USA=
Anonymous
April 23, 2005 9:36:17 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.mac.apps,rec.photo.digital,misc.consumers,comp.sys.mac.hardware (More info?)

Garner Miller wrote:
> In article <s50l611ae5ruousfdnopn0uib6t10amspv@4ax.com>, Bob Ward
> <bobward@verizon.net> wrote:
>
>
>>So, what do you do when you need to copy a CD on your Mac? Find
>>someone smart enough to buy a system with both a source and a
>>destination drive?
>
>
> You put the disk in, hit "copy," it makes an image and ejects it, then
> you put a blank in, and it writes what it read earlier, as many times
> as you need. Since I make about 3 straight copies a year, if that, I
> don't feel the need to have two separate CD drives, one to read and one
> to write. (And if that changes, I can always add one later.)
>
Yeah, besides, they take up too much room in a laptop! Grin.


--
Ron Hunter rphunter@charter.net
Anonymous
April 23, 2005 9:39:13 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.mac.apps,rec.photo.digital,misc.consumers,comp.sys.mac.hardware (More info?)

Bob Ward wrote:
>
>
> So, what do you do when you need to copy a CD on your Mac? Find
> someone smart enough to buy a system with both a source and a
> destination drive?
>
>

Easily done with a single drive. If not, all laptop owners (Mac or PC)
would be SOL
Anonymous
April 23, 2005 9:39:14 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.mac.apps,rec.photo.digital,misc.consumers,comp.sys.mac.hardware (More info?)

Phil Wheeler wrote:
> Bob Ward wrote:
>
>>
>>
>> So, what do you do when you need to copy a CD on your Mac? Find
>> someone smart enough to buy a system with both a source and a
>> destination drive?
>>
>>
>
> Easily done with a single drive. If not, all laptop owners (Mac or PC)
> would be SOL
Well, not exactly. I have NEVER copied a CD. NOt something I need. I
sometimes (very rarely) burn one, but I have never copied one.


--
Ron Hunter rphunter@charter.net
Anonymous
April 23, 2005 10:35:49 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.mac.apps,rec.photo.digital,misc.consumers,comp.sys.mac.hardware (More info?)

In article <wtCae.12342$go4.4613@newsread2.news.atl.earthlink.net>, leo
<someone@somewhere.net> wrote:

> Nevertheless, I am betting the future's going to be Linux.

HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA
Anonymous
April 23, 2005 10:48:21 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.mac.apps,rec.photo.digital,misc.consumers,comp.sys.mac.hardware (More info?)

Ron Hunter wrote:

>> Easily done with a single drive. If not, all laptop owners (Mac or
>> PC) would be SOL
>
> Well, not exactly. I have NEVER copied a CD. NOt something I need. I
> sometimes (very rarely) burn one, but I have never copied one.
>

I'm a bit paranoid. I tend to backup my original install disks and
stash the originals in a safe place (now if I could only remember where
that is) :-)

Really, not a constraint, though. Main machine (a 64 bit AMD) has two
burners and I have an external USB2/Firewire DVD burner for laptops.

Phil
Anonymous
April 24, 2005 12:37:21 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.mac.apps,rec.photo.digital,misc.consumers,comp.sys.mac.hardware (More info?)

In article <stan-4C3DCF.14553523042005@news.giganews.com>,
Stan Horwitz <stan@temple.edu> wrote:

> And how much time have you spent caring and feeding your Windows box?
> How many times have you had to rebuild the OS, clean out a virus, and
> maintain anti-virus software? Me? The answer is near zero minutes for
> all three of my Macs and several hours for my Windows XP Pro box.

You have to remember that those guys never remember all of that work
when they're talking about how great Windows is when compared to Macs.

They only remember all of that Windows troubleshooting and maintenance
when they're telling other Windows guys how smart they are for making it
all work...
Anonymous
April 24, 2005 12:44:39 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.mac.apps,rec.photo.digital,misc.consumers,comp.sys.mac.hardware (More info?)

In article <Slwae.14941$c42.13004@fe07.lga>,
Ron Hunter <rphunter@charter.net> wrote:

> BTW, just about every PC I have seen advertised includes a DVD-ROM and
> CD-RW, even the pretty basic ones.I can't imagine that Dell doesn't. If
> not, that is their error.

Actually, it's the error of the person who thought that buying the
cheapest list price PC they could find means that they're getting a good
deal.

Which would be, er, you.

Here's another little note: It's a problem at the top end, too.
Anonymous
April 24, 2005 12:44:40 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.mac.apps,rec.photo.digital,misc.consumers,comp.sys.mac.hardware (More info?)

Chad Irby wrote:
> In article <Slwae.14941$c42.13004@fe07.lga>,
> Ron Hunter <rphunter@charter.net> wrote:
>
>
>>BTW, just about every PC I have seen advertised includes a DVD-ROM and
>>CD-RW, even the pretty basic ones.I can't imagine that Dell doesn't. If
>>not, that is their error.
>
>
> Actually, it's the error of the person who thought that buying the
> cheapest list price PC they could find means that they're getting a good
> deal.
>
> Which would be, er, you.
>
> Here's another little note: It's a problem at the top end, too.

What is, or is not, a good deal depends on the person's needs, and his
budget. If the choice is a $300 E-Machines, or a $1200 iMac, and you
only have $300, then the choice is the $300 machine, or no computer at
all. No contest.


--
Ron Hunter rphunter@charter.net
Anonymous
April 24, 2005 12:44:41 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.mac.apps,rec.photo.digital,misc.consumers,comp.sys.mac.hardware (More info?)

In article <w1zae.19268$Ow2.4615@fe06.lga>, Ron Hunter
<rphunter@charter.net> wrote:

> ...If the choice is a $300 E-Machines, or a $1200 iMac, and you
> only have $300, then the choice is the $300 machine, or no computer at
> all. No contest.

Agreed. Based on my customers experience with entry level E-Machines,
no computer at all IS a much better choice!
April 24, 2005 12:47:36 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.mac.apps,rec.photo.digital,misc.consumers,comp.sys.mac.hardware (More info?)

On Sat, 23 Apr 2005 16:11:06 -0500, Ron Hunter wrote:

> Stan Horwitz wrote:
>> In article <tOtae.9169$Gq6.7226@fe02.lga>,
>> Ron Hunter <rphunter@charter.net> wrote:
>>
>>>If one has an older machine, and just wants to replace the old one with
>>>a newer machine (smaller, most likely) with the current OS, and doesn't
>>>need the peripherals, then it isn't a bad deal. For a new user, it
>>>probably isn't such a great deal.
>>
>>
>> Again, it really depends on one's needs. For me, a Mac mini would be a
>> terrible choice. I have a dual processor 2.5Ghtz G5 machine at home, and
>> I already put it through its paces with Photoshop. Another friend of
>> mine just told me today that he got a Mac mini for home. It replaces an
>> original iMac and he and his family are thrilled with it.
> Like I said, if you already have suitable monitor/keyboard/mouse, etc.,
> it can be a good way to upgrade to the latest OS, and a newer processor.
> For a starter, I suspect most people would like to buy the whole
> system, already more or less configured.

I was thinking of a Mac Mini just as an internet appliance. Maybe.

--
Keith
Anonymous
April 24, 2005 12:47:37 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.mac.apps,rec.photo.digital,misc.consumers,comp.sys.mac.hardware (More info?)

keith wrote:
> On Sat, 23 Apr 2005 16:11:06 -0500, Ron Hunter wrote:
>
>
>>Stan Horwitz wrote:
>>
>>>In article <tOtae.9169$Gq6.7226@fe02.lga>,
>>> Ron Hunter <rphunter@charter.net> wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>>If one has an older machine, and just wants to replace the old one with
>>>>a newer machine (smaller, most likely) with the current OS, and doesn't
>>>>need the peripherals, then it isn't a bad deal. For a new user, it
>>>>probably isn't such a great deal.
>>>
>>>
>>>Again, it really depends on one's needs. For me, a Mac mini would be a
>>>terrible choice. I have a dual processor 2.5Ghtz G5 machine at home, and
>>>I already put it through its paces with Photoshop. Another friend of
>>>mine just told me today that he got a Mac mini for home. It replaces an
>>>original iMac and he and his family are thrilled with it.
>>
>>Like I said, if you already have suitable monitor/keyboard/mouse, etc.,
>>it can be a good way to upgrade to the latest OS, and a newer processor.
>> For a starter, I suspect most people would like to buy the whole
>>system, already more or less configured.
>
>
> I was thinking of a Mac Mini just as an internet appliance. Maybe.
>
Fine, but if you don't add a keyboard, mouse, and monitor, at least, it
is a pretty good doorstop. Too small for boat anchor. Grin.
Even Macs don't do much without a way to get the data in and out.


--
Ron Hunter rphunter@charter.net
April 24, 2005 2:36:44 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.mac.apps,rec.photo.digital,misc.consumers,comp.sys.mac.hardware (More info?)

On Sat, 23 Apr 2005 20:34:03 -0500, Ron Hunter wrote:

> keith wrote:
>> On Sat, 23 Apr 2005 16:11:06 -0500, Ron Hunter wrote:
>>
>>
>>>Stan Horwitz wrote:
>>>
>>>>In article <tOtae.9169$Gq6.7226@fe02.lga>,
>>>> Ron Hunter <rphunter@charter.net> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>>If one has an older machine, and just wants to replace the old one with
>>>>>a newer machine (smaller, most likely) with the current OS, and doesn't
>>>>>need the peripherals, then it isn't a bad deal. For a new user, it
>>>>>probably isn't such a great deal.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>Again, it really depends on one's needs. For me, a Mac mini would be a
>>>>terrible choice. I have a dual processor 2.5Ghtz G5 machine at home, and
>>>>I already put it through its paces with Photoshop. Another friend of
>>>>mine just told me today that he got a Mac mini for home. It replaces an
>>>>original iMac and he and his family are thrilled with it.
>>>
>>>Like I said, if you already have suitable monitor/keyboard/mouse, etc.,
>>>it can be a good way to upgrade to the latest OS, and a newer processor.
>>> For a starter, I suspect most people would like to buy the whole
>>>system, already more or less configured.
>>
>>
>> I was thinking of a Mac Mini just as an internet appliance. Maybe.
>>
> Fine, but if you don't add a keyboard, mouse, and monitor, at least, it
> is a pretty good doorstop. Too small for boat anchor. Grin.
> Even Macs don't do much without a way to get the data in and out.

t'would be pretty secure then, eh? ;-) Nah, I'd put it on my KVM switch
and router. I have a Linux (this one) and WinBlows system on a KVM now.

--

Keith
April 24, 2005 5:13:14 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Sat, 23 Apr 2005 08:30:28 -0400
In message <230420050830282464%not@aol.com>
Scott Schuckert <not@aol.com> wrote:

> Actually, there are two issues at work here. Ordering BTO (Build To
> Order) does indeed negate the somewhat-informal "satisfaction
> guarantee"; once you've done that, the computer can't be described by
> one of the standard part numbers and so can't go back into inventory.

It can go back into inventory when they send them back to mexico for
repacking... changing a hard drive would not be a problem. Or maybe
they rotate them into the tax write-off free school computer program
(the only reason Apple managed to stay in business).

Besides, that is the ONLY way to order from Apple.com. You select the
options you want, and there is no mention of voiding the guarantee.
That's BS. Especially when they are "assembled to order" in Mexico.

As to the so-called "defective screens are okay" that most companies
push on consumers, yeah, I considered that... the satisfaction
guarantee covered the possibility. Apple basically said FU.

Jeff
Anonymous
April 24, 2005 6:40:22 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.mac.apps,rec.photo.digital,misc.consumers,comp.sys.mac.hardware (More info?)

On Sat, 23 Apr 2005 17:36:16 GMT, Garner Miller <garner@netstreet.net>
wrote:

>In article <s50l611ae5ruousfdnopn0uib6t10amspv@4ax.com>, Bob Ward
><bobward@verizon.net> wrote:
>
>> So, what do you do when you need to copy a CD on your Mac? Find
>> someone smart enough to buy a system with both a source and a
>> destination drive?
>
>You put the disk in, hit "copy," it makes an image and ejects it, then
>you put a blank in, and it writes what it read earlier, as many times
>as you need. Since I make about 3 straight copies a year, if that, I
>don't feel the need to have two separate CD drives, one to read and one
>to write. (And if that changes, I can always add one later.)


And you think that, based on YOUR admittedly limited experience, that
everyone who is buying a system with both a source and destination
drive is being ripped off?

Perhaps you need to post the maximum amount of RAM and video
resolution we are allowed to purchase while you are at it.
Anonymous
April 24, 2005 6:40:51 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.mac.apps,rec.photo.digital,misc.consumers,comp.sys.mac.hardware (More info?)

On Sat, 23 Apr 2005 17:39:13 GMT, Phil Wheeler <w6tuh-ng4@yahoo.com>
wrote:

>Bob Ward wrote:
>>
>>
>> So, what do you do when you need to copy a CD on your Mac? Find
>> someone smart enough to buy a system with both a source and a
>> destination drive?
>>
>>
>
>Easily done with a single drive. If not, all laptop owners (Mac or PC)
>would be SOL

More easily done on a properly equipped system.
April 24, 2005 7:15:13 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.mac.apps,rec.photo.digital,misc.consumers,comp.sys.mac.hardware (More info?)

Randall Ainsworth wrote:
> In article <wtCae.12342$go4.4613@newsread2.news.atl.earthlink.net>, leo
> <someone@somewhere.net> wrote:
>
>
>>Nevertheless, I am betting the future's going to be Linux.
>
>
> HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA


Why do you laugh? Brazilian government is putting Linux and free
software in the PC that is being sold to the poors. Many people in the
world are not/won't be buying any Macs, not even the Mini. so, why would
they want to pay for Windows either?

And finally an OS is just an OS. Don't people always scream to have a
lean OS? If it's stable and can handle real time applications, why do we
need upgrading? Take a look at the new OSX 10.4 - Tiger, I can't tell I
am running Puma, Jaguar, Panther or even Tiger. It's more like a bundle
of a few goodies. And all those security updates from Apple are just as
much as Microsoft's. Apple took the solid Darwin and build anything they
want on top of it. As long as there is solid UI, even on par with WinXP,
it's good enough for many people.

The smart company would be the first one to ship their flagship products
for Linux. There are already a handful of them. We are just waiting
for now, the giant, Adobe, Autodesk, etc.
Anonymous
April 24, 2005 7:15:14 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.mac.apps,rec.photo.digital,misc.consumers,comp.sys.mac.hardware (More info?)

In article <5bEae.15695$44.3184@newsread1.news.atl.earthlink.net>, leo
<someone@somewhere.net> wrote:

> Why do you laugh? Brazilian government is putting Linux and free
> software in the PC that is being sold to the poors. Many people in the
> world are not/won't be buying any Macs, not even the Mini. so, why would
> they want to pay for Windows either?

Do pocket protectors and tape on the glasses come with it? You penguins
just don't get it. Linux will NEVER EVER achieve mainstream popularity.

> And finally an OS is just an OS. Don't people always scream to have a
> lean OS? If it's stable and can handle real time applications, why do we
> need upgrading? Take a look at the new OSX 10.4 - Tiger, I can't tell I
> am running Puma, Jaguar, Panther or even Tiger. It's more like a bundle
> of a few goodies. And all those security updates from Apple are just as
> much as Microsoft's. Apple took the solid Darwin and build anything they
> want on top of it. As long as there is solid UI, even on par with WinXP,
> it's good enough for many people.

I'm running Tiger as we speak.
Anonymous
April 24, 2005 7:21:56 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.mac.apps,rec.photo.digital,misc.consumers,comp.sys.mac.hardware (More info?)

Randall Ainsworth wrote:
> In article <wtCae.12342$go4.4613@newsread2.news.atl.earthlink.net>, leo
> <someone@somewhere.net> wrote:
>
>
>>Nevertheless, I am betting the future's going to be Linux.
>
>
> HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA
Unix is ok, as long as you bury it deeply enough under a graphic user
interface, such as OS X. Since my only exposure to it has been through
its command line interface, I am not predisposed to finding it
desirable, however.


--
Ron Hunter rphunter@charter.net
Anonymous
April 24, 2005 7:23:37 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.mac.apps,rec.photo.digital,misc.consumers,comp.sys.mac.hardware (More info?)

Randall Ainsworth wrote:
> In article <5bEae.15695$44.3184@newsread1.news.atl.earthlink.net>, leo
> <someone@somewhere.net> wrote:
>
>
>>Why do you laugh? Brazilian government is putting Linux and free
>>software in the PC that is being sold to the poors. Many people in the
>>world are not/won't be buying any Macs, not even the Mini. so, why would
>>they want to pay for Windows either?
>
>
> Do pocket protectors and tape on the glasses come with it? You penguins
> just don't get it. Linux will NEVER EVER achieve mainstream popularity.
>
>
>>And finally an OS is just an OS. Don't people always scream to have a
>>lean OS? If it's stable and can handle real time applications, why do we
>>need upgrading? Take a look at the new OSX 10.4 - Tiger, I can't tell I
>>am running Puma, Jaguar, Panther or even Tiger. It's more like a bundle
>>of a few goodies. And all those security updates from Apple are just as
>>much as Microsoft's. Apple took the solid Darwin and build anything they
>>want on top of it. As long as there is solid UI, even on par with WinXP,
>>it's good enough for many people.
>
>
> I'm running Tiger as we speak.

Oh? And just WHAT is the underlying OS?


--
Ron Hunter rphunter@charter.net
Anonymous
April 24, 2005 7:25:47 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.mac.apps,rec.photo.digital,misc.consumers,comp.sys.mac.hardware (More info?)

Bob Ward wrote:
> On Sat, 23 Apr 2005 17:36:16 GMT, Garner Miller <garner@netstreet.net>
> wrote:
>
>
>>In article <s50l611ae5ruousfdnopn0uib6t10amspv@4ax.com>, Bob Ward
>><bobward@verizon.net> wrote:
>>
>>
>>>So, what do you do when you need to copy a CD on your Mac? Find
>>>someone smart enough to buy a system with both a source and a
>>>destination drive?
>>
>>You put the disk in, hit "copy," it makes an image and ejects it, then
>>you put a blank in, and it writes what it read earlier, as many times
>>as you need. Since I make about 3 straight copies a year, if that, I
>>don't feel the need to have two separate CD drives, one to read and one
>>to write. (And if that changes, I can always add one later.)
>
>
>
> And you think that, based on YOUR admittedly limited experience, that
> everyone who is buying a system with both a source and destination
> drive is being ripped off?
>
> Perhaps you need to post the maximum amount of RAM and video
> resolution we are allowed to purchase while you are at it.
>
>
>
>
That's not what he said. Just that the job CAN be done with one, and
that, for some, that job is rare. Not everyone wants to dup 100 copies
of the lastest Janet Jackson CD, or Adobe Photoshop CS.
Having both drives is only a convenience.


--
Ron Hunter rphunter@charter.net
Anonymous
April 24, 2005 7:26:45 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.mac.apps,rec.photo.digital,misc.consumers,comp.sys.mac.hardware (More info?)

Bob Ward wrote:
> On Sat, 23 Apr 2005 17:39:13 GMT, Phil Wheeler <w6tuh-ng4@yahoo.com>
> wrote:
>
>
>>Bob Ward wrote:
>>
>>>
>>>So, what do you do when you need to copy a CD on your Mac? Find
>>>someone smart enough to buy a system with both a source and a
>>>destination drive?
>>>
>>>
>>
>>Easily done with a single drive. If not, all laptop owners (Mac or PC)
>>would be SOL
>
>
> More easily done on a properly equipped system.
>
>
In the case of a laptop, 'properly quipped' may be a bit different from
a desktop.


--
Ron Hunter rphunter@charter.net
Anonymous
April 24, 2005 9:05:58 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.mac.apps,rec.photo.digital,misc.consumers,comp.sys.mac.hardware (More info?)

In article <w1zae.19268$Ow2.4615@fe06.lga>,
Ron Hunter <rphunter@charter.net> wrote:

> What is, or is not, a good deal depends on the person's needs, and his
> budget. If the choice is a $300 E-Machines, or a $1200 iMac, and you
> only have $300, then the choice is the $300 machine, or no computer at
> all. No contest.

....then you should probably buy a used Mac instead, since even a used
Mac is better than a bottom-end machine from a company like E-Machines.
Anonymous
April 24, 2005 9:11:17 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.mac.apps,rec.photo.digital,misc.consumers,comp.sys.mac.hardware (More info?)

In article <w%yae.19267$Ow2.17284@fe06.lga>,
Ron Hunter <rphunter@charter.net> wrote:

> Basically, your ignorance of PCs, and the Windows XP OS are so abysmal
> that there is no sense trying to dissuade you from your preconceived
> notions. Never mind.

Ah, the "I'm so much smarter and more experienced with PCs" brag.

You see that a lot online. Usually, by someone who either sells PC
support for a living, or someone who loves to brag about how good they
are at fixing PCs.

Works really well when you're talking an uneducated customer into buying
a bunch of PCs that you're going to get paid to support, but it's not so
good when you're talking to someone who gets paid to make them work.

It unravels completely when you hit Google for "Service Pack 2."
Anonymous
April 24, 2005 9:12:49 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.mac.apps,rec.photo.digital,misc.consumers,comp.sys.mac.hardware (More info?)

In article <iWyae.19265$Ow2.14199@fe06.lga>,
Ron Hunter <rphunter@charter.net> wrote:

> ANY computer can have security problems as they are usually caused by
> operator error.

Ah, so you've never actually *used* Windows in any form, then.
Anonymous
April 24, 2005 9:28:29 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.mac.apps,rec.photo.digital,misc.consumers,comp.sys.mac.hardware (More info?)

In article <so1m61dmiova070jplicogmqe6sh9hp9eb@4ax.com>,
Bob Ward <bobward@verizon.net> wrote:

> On Sat, 23 Apr 2005 17:39:13 GMT, Phil Wheeler <w6tuh-ng4@yahoo.com>
> wrote:
>
> >Bob Ward wrote:
> >>
> >>
> >> So, what do you do when you need to copy a CD on your Mac? Find
> >> someone smart enough to buy a system with both a source and a
> >> destination drive?
> >>
> >>
> >
> >Easily done with a single drive. If not, all laptop owners (Mac or PC)
> >would be SOL
>
> More easily done on a properly equipped system.

What's your point? Anyone who has a need, can easily add a second CD-RW
and/or DVD writer to a Mac.
Anonymous
April 24, 2005 11:53:42 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.mac.apps,rec.photo.digital,misc.consumers,comp.sys.mac.hardware (More info?)

In article <dIIae.5827$f6.3429@fe04.lga>, Ron Hunter
<rphunter@charter.net> wrote:

> Oh? And just WHAT is the underlying OS?

It ain't your precious Linux.
Anonymous
April 24, 2005 11:55:00 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.mac.apps,rec.photo.digital,misc.consumers,comp.sys.mac.hardware (More info?)

In article <cirby-977DD3.01055724042005@news-server2.tampabay.rr.com>,
Chad Irby <cirby@cfl.rr.com> wrote:

> ...then you should probably buy a used Mac instead, since even a used
> Mac is better than a bottom-end machine from a company like E-Machines.

Anything is better than an E-machine.
Anonymous
April 24, 2005 11:57:22 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.mac.apps,rec.photo.digital,misc.consumers,comp.sys.mac.hardware (More info?)

> Mac mail weeds out 99.9% of SPAM. What about Outlook? Forget it! Outlook
> is a Microsoft product designed to fail - it makes no profit for the
> company so why improve it? Third party software does a much better job.
> Window media player used to be a joke as it couldn't handle the most
> popular file format - mp3.

Outlook is a virus distribution client with E-mail capabilities.
Anonymous
April 24, 2005 12:46:44 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.mac.apps,rec.photo.digital,misc.consumers,comp.sys.mac.hardware (More info?)

Ron Hunter wrote:
> Randall Ainsworth wrote:
>
>> In article <wtCae.12342$go4.4613@newsread2.news.atl.earthlink.net>, leo
>> <someone@somewhere.net> wrote:
>>
>>
>>> Nevertheless, I am betting the future's going to be Linux.
>>
>>
>>
>> HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA
>
> Unix is ok, as long as you bury it deeply enough under a graphic user
> interface, such as OS X. Since my only exposure to it has been through
> its command line interface, I am not predisposed to finding it
> desirable, however.
>
>

Most of my unix use has been cmd line, too. There some nice GUI front
ends for Linux, but my experience (have SUSE on one laptop) is that it
is still a tinkerer's delight -- unlike OS X and WinXP. I do like the
ability in OS X to use its underlying unix elements to do things like
make certain printers work (e.g., my aged Lasejet) from my iBook.

Phil
!