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Strange speaker noise from new build pc

Last response: in Motherboards
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December 27, 2012 10:37:37 AM

Hello,
so my problem is that my speaker has no other sound but a strange noise when i plug it into my new build pc(front or rear jack), its a cm elite 311 casing, asrock h77m mobo and running windows 7 64bit.

i tried the speaker on my macbook and it worked just fine. i also reformatted my windows but the sound are still there.

i plugged in another old speaker to the pc and it also has the same problem(strange noise).

is it the motherboard audio jack or somewhat are causing this? the speaker was working fine on the new build pc before(using intel hd graphic) and after a long day i was messing with the graphic card (some problem) and finally get the graphic card to work then when i turn on my pc again it has this problem... it is really frustrating and double face palm... would buying a cheap external sound card fix this? pls help anyone?
a b V Motherboard
December 27, 2012 12:00:36 PM

First re-install your audio driver, download it from your motherboard's site. What's your system specs? Also check the front panel audio header and make sure you haven't shorted any of the pins there.
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a b V Motherboard
December 27, 2012 12:19:56 PM

are you sure you have the audio header connector connected to the Audio portion of the motherboard correctly, and not USB or something else...?
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December 27, 2012 5:13:58 PM

audio header connector u mean is something like hd audio and ac97? if so yes
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December 27, 2012 5:29:13 PM

do you hear it when you scroll webpages or all the time? if its webpages the two asrocks ive dealt with both did that
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December 27, 2012 5:40:19 PM

it just has no other sound but some kind of noise no matter what im doing when i plug it in
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December 27, 2012 5:41:05 PM

zdbc13 said:
First re-install your audio driver, download it from your motherboard's site. What's your system specs? Also check the front panel audio header and make sure you haven't shorted any of the pins there.

i even formatted my new build computer but still the same
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December 27, 2012 5:53:26 PM

id say its either a faulty connection, or your onboard sound card is damaged
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December 27, 2012 5:59:09 PM

so anyway to fix it? cheap usb audio adapter or sound card can fix this?
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December 28, 2012 1:19:19 AM

You've found out first-hand why on-board audio should be avoided (in general.) It is very difficult to shield the audio from everything else in the system. Some chipsets are more successful than others, but the noise will always be there, especially if your speakers have a high sensitivity. As others have hinted, you're hearing the interference from the other data-processing parts of the southbridge.

Installing another sound card isn't a guaranteed solution since noise can still creep in through the power supply. I've had this problem on my old Intel Q6600 HTPC build; adding a Creative X-Fi Platinum didn't *completely* resolve it, nor did using the optical output from a Turtle Beach card.

The solution is to throw more money at the system in the form of an external (USB) sound device with an independent power source.
FWIW, I disabled the on-board audio on my current Ivy Bridge build and bought Vanatoo Transparent One speakers...
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a b V Motherboard
December 28, 2012 2:11:54 AM

0412041 said:
audio header connector u mean is something like hd audio and ac97? if so yes

No, that's not what I mean... you said more than once this computer is a new build, so you must have had to make all the connections to the motherboard you installed - which include the Audio Header cable that goes to the front panel connectors on the case. It's supposed to be connected to the Audio pins on the motherboard.

Have you checked to make sure you connected the cable into the correct position on the motherboard?
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December 28, 2012 3:26:44 AM

dingo07 said:
No, that's not what I mean... you said more than once this computer is a new build, so you must have had to make all the connections to the motherboard you installed - which include the Audio Header cable that goes to the front panel connectors on the case. It's supposed to be connected to the Audio pins on the motherboard.

Have you checked to make sure you connected the cable into the correct position on the motherboard?

yes of course
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December 28, 2012 4:20:07 AM

major-error said:
You've found out first-hand why on-board audio should be avoided (in general.) It is very difficult to shield the audio from everything else in the system. Some chipsets are more successful than others, but the noise will always be there, especially if your speakers have a high sensitivity. As others have hinted, you're hearing the interference from the other data-processing parts of the southbridge.

Installing another sound card isn't a guaranteed solution since noise can still creep in through the power supply. I've had this problem on my old Intel Q6600 HTPC build; adding a Creative X-Fi Platinum didn't *completely* resolve it, nor did using the optical output from a Turtle Beach card.

The solution is to throw more money at the system in the form of an external (USB) sound device with an independent power source.
FWIW, I disabled the on-board audio on my current Ivy Bridge build and bought Vanatoo Transparent One speakers...

then its the power supply or the mobo problem? and what is the cheap price of external (USB) sound device u r talking about? thx
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December 28, 2012 5:26:01 AM

0412041 said:
then its the power supply or the mobo problem? and what is the cheap price of external (USB) sound device u r talking about? thx

There isn't necessarily going to be a *cheap* solution. It all depends on your budget and annoyance factor.

Another facet to the problem is what is coming from the wall outlet--if you have a noisy municipal power supply, a quality PSU *might* help, but something that actively "cleans up" the feed is more-desirable. A lot of my equipment is also behind an APC Back-UPS Pro or Smart-UPS (graceful shutdowns during power outages are an added bonus.)

If you want to (also) continue down the external sound route and have no need for inputs like a microphone, something like the AudioEngine D1 would be a reasonable start.
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a b V Motherboard
December 28, 2012 12:05:52 PM

Try disconnecting your front panel header and see if that improves the situation. There may be RF leakage in your front panel cables.
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December 28, 2012 9:23:28 PM

problem fixed by buying a cheap usb to audio adapter
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!