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What power supply and GPU should I get?

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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September 26, 2011 1:50:40 AM

I'm thinking about replacing the graphics card on my Gateway FX 6840-15e, it's an ATI Radeon HD 5750 and I'd like to upgrade to this. I'm not absolutely set on this card so any upgrade that would push me past a certain benchmark would be great, I'm surpassing the minimum for BF3 but the only thing holding me back from the recommended specs is my GPU.

I'm 90% sure that my power supply isn't enough so does anyone know type of power supply I should get? I've never upgraded a computer before and I've only got the information from CPU-Z to go on. It's telling me I've got a PCI Express x16 slot for graphics but I can't find if I've got PCI 2.0 or not. CPU-Z is telling me that my Mainboard spec is the Gateway FX6840

I'm also just looking for some information on what I would be doing to increase performance over time with this rig. I'd like for it to last at least another year before I think about a major overhaul or a new rig. I'm pretty new at this thing and everyone here seems so nice :) .

Other info: My monitor resolution is 1600x900, my current power supply says its max wattage is 450W, and I know what overclocking is but I've never done it before nor do I know the specifics of it.

Thanks!

More about : power supply gpu

a b U Graphics card
a b ) Power supply
September 26, 2011 1:55:34 AM

As far as PSUs are concerned, be informed. Before you buy any PSU read accurate, objective PSU reviews at reputable sites such as www.jonnyguru.com or www.hardwaresecrets.com on the EXACT model PSU that you are interested in as some brands have good and poor quality PSUs.

You can also get an accurate rating of how much PSU power is required for your current or future system at the PSU calculator link below. Once you know the total PSU watts required then you need to confirm that the 12v rail has enough amps. to support your Vid card(s) and the rest of the PC system.

There are several websites that show the Vid card power consumption in watts. Divide the watts by 12 to determine the amps. required on the 12v rail(s). Add 15 amps for the rest of the PC on the 12v rail and you now know the Minimum total 12v rail amps required under full load. It's best to have at least 5-10 amps. reserve on the 12v rail available under full load so the PSU is not loaded to 100%.

It's also worth noting that people often misunderstand the 80% power rating. This is a rating of the PSU's energy efficiency not it's output. 80% plus PSUs use less grid power to produce the same PC power. If it's 80% Bronze, Silver or Gold the cost savings on electricity is pretty small between Bronze, Silver and Gold unless you are paying very high rates for electricity so any 80% rated quality PSU is fine even if not Gold. For those who leave their PC on 24/7 a quality 80% PSU is a good investment.


http://extreme.outervision.com/psucalculatorlite.jsp

http://www.guru3d.com/article/geforce-gtx-560-ti-sli-re...

http://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/NVIDIA/GeForce_GTX_5...

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a c 214 U Graphics card
a b ) Power supply
September 26, 2011 1:58:28 AM

The GTX560ti would be a very nice upgrade from the 5750.

It has a 450watt PSU but I don't know if it's a quality one or not.

Do you know how many amps are on the +12/v rail(s) on your 450 watt PSU?

Since it's an i7 870 you still have some mileage left on it.I would suggest O.C.ing for improved performance and it should last you a while longer.Should last you about 2-3 years more.

What is your budget for the new PSU(if you infact need one) and the GPU?

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a c 214 U Graphics card
a b ) Power supply
September 26, 2011 1:59:54 AM

beenthere said:
As far as PSUs are concerned, be informed. Before you buy any PSU read accurate, objective PSU reviews at reputable sites such as www.jonnyguru.com or www.hardwaresecrets.com on the EXACT model PSU that you are interested in as some brands have good and poor quality PSUs.

You can also get an accurate rating of how much PSU power is required for your current or future system at the PSU calculator link below. Once you know the total PSU watts required then you need to confirm that the 12v rail has enough amps. to support your Vid card(s) and the rest of the PC system.

There are several websites that show the Vid card power consumption in watts. Divide the watts by 12 to determine the amps. required on the 12v rail(s). Add 15 amps for the rest of the PC on the 12v rail and you now know the Minimum total 12v rail amps required under full load. It's best to have at least 5-10 amps. reserve on the 12v rail available under full load so the PSU is not loaded to 100%.

It's also worth noting that people often misunderstand the 80% power rating. This is a rating of the PSU's energy efficiency not it's output. 80% plus PSUs use less grid power to produce the same PC power. If it's 80% Bronze, Silver or Gold the cost savings on electricity is pretty small between Bronze, Silver and Gold unless you are paying very high rates for electricity so any 80% rated quality PSU is fine even if not Gold. For those who leave their PC on 24/7 a quality 80% PSU is a good investment.


http://extreme.outervision.com/psucalculatorlite.jsp

http://www.guru3d.com/article/geforce-gtx-560-ti-sli-re...

http://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/NVIDIA/GeForce_GTX_5...


Do you copy and paste that every time?
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September 26, 2011 2:05:56 AM

I'm looking at my PSU now and while I'm not sure (because the grid label isn't very clear) it's telling me that my 3.3V rail outputs 16A, my 5V rail is 20A my 12V1 rail is 18A, and my 12V2 rail is also 18A. Right below the 12v1 and 12v2 grids it says that my max W is 360. Also is there a way to find out if I've got a PCI Express 2.0 slot? I believe I've got it from this page on the specs tab.
As far as budget is concerned I'm pretty flexible, I figure the money I save by getting a nice graphics card and PSU and transferring them over to my next comp is worth it, not to mention PC gaming is cheaper in the long run.

When it comes to the size of the PSU, are they different sizes? I'd rather not get one and have it be too big.
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Best solution

a c 214 U Graphics card
a b ) Power supply
September 26, 2011 2:40:59 AM

You can look up the info/spec on the mobo on the manufactuer's website.Your mobo is probably a 2.0 slot since it's somewhat new.

Their are lots of different sizes of PSU's but their all mostly ATX.Of course they do vary within a couple inches.

I would suggest going with these GTX560ti's because they offer really really good cooling solutions.

Asus GTX560ti high O.C.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Asus GTX560ti + Game

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

MSI GTX560ti slight O.C.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

As for the PSU, it's always good to get a bigger PSU than you need for futureproofing.Who know maybe someday you will want to SLI.

Seasonic 620watt

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
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September 29, 2011 8:02:38 PM

Best answer selected by jp0249107.
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November 15, 2011 7:27:58 PM

jp0249107 said:
Best answer selected by jp0249107.

nHi there, so I'm interested what card you got and what PSU? How is the performance now? I'm also thinking about upgrading, but in my case I would go with a GTX 460 OC (MSI, Palit or eVGA). Please let me know - thanks
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