Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Closed

System Builder Marathon, August 2012: $1000 Enthusiast PC

Last response: in Reviews comments
Share
August 21, 2012 4:30:44 AM

Bring on the usual motley crew of those who could have done it so much better.
Score
23
August 21, 2012 4:47:37 AM

What's going on with the processor price. The i5-3570k is $230 not $300. Then there's no mention of the CPU cooler in the price list.

And you're pairing an Ivy Bridge CPU with a P67 motherboard to save a few dollars?

Does anybody proofread these articles?
Score
19
Related resources
August 21, 2012 4:51:58 AM

^^^ Just noticed and was starting to type that same mistake too :) 
+1 for the p67 and not a maybe a B75 based mobo like:

or

Z77 based mobo for ~$95 shipped??


Just a though on the mobo situation....

Score
4
August 21, 2012 4:55:57 AM

^^^ Links didn't work, trying again below:

Score
-2
August 21, 2012 5:15:24 AM

i love how much difference a few months had on the performance.

Just want to mention : i dont see the use of including an optical drive in 2012. i cant remember the last time i used an optical drive. And with digital sales outselling physical discs, i dont see why it is included.
Its not about saving $15. Its about buying a part that you will be using less than a couple of times in an year.probably lesser.
Score
-5
August 21, 2012 5:51:07 AM

lighter17What's going on with the processor price. The i5-3570k is $230 not $300. Then there's no mention of the CPU cooler in the price list. And you're pairing an Ivy Bridge CPU with a P67 motherboard to save a few dollars?Does anybody proofread these articles?

Good catch. Not sure what was up with Don's pricing, but his CPU was way off, and he forgot to include the cooler in his price list. I've updated it, and it's only $7 bucks off his original quote, so we're still in good shape. Appreciate the sharp eye, guys!
Chris
Score
10
August 21, 2012 6:13:03 AM

mayankleoboy1i love how much difference a few months had on the performance.Just want to mention : i dont see the use of including an optical drive in 2012. i cant remember the last time i used an optical drive. And with digital sales outselling physical discs, i dont see why it is included. Its not about saving $15. Its about buying a part that you will be using less than a couple of times in an year.probably lesser.

I think there is still a place for optical drives. I just finished a new tower build myself, an i5 3570k myself with the same video card on an Asus P8Z77-V Deluxe. I put in a Blur Ray burner that was only $90. With almost all new phones doing 1080p video, I can burn discs for friends and family of personal videos. People also still have CD players in cars and honestly, on a price per GB bases, it's still the best form of backup.
Score
20
Anonymous
August 21, 2012 6:45:03 AM

60 gb SSD? why bother?
Score
-24
August 21, 2012 7:05:11 AM

The asrock professional series is shown whereas the actual motherboard being used is the performance series.

I almost thought the motherboard had 3 pcie slots for only $100- that would have been a steal!
Score
-1
August 21, 2012 7:11:03 AM

Any particular reason for P67 over Z77? Is it purely cost-based, or are there significant performance benefits?
Score
5
Anonymous
August 21, 2012 7:35:11 AM

Looks promising except for the UEFI issue. What motherboard would you recommend for someone who doesn't happen to have a spare Sandy Bridge processor around to update the UEFI?
Score
10
August 21, 2012 7:44:59 AM

I thought the ivy bridge wasn't that good in overclocking as sandy bridge, cause of the whole intel hd graphics being bigger and all the overheating?
Score
-5
August 21, 2012 7:47:36 AM

In my opinion, you should stick to the budget, Tom's. Part of the fun (and the reality of the situation for most people) are the tradeoffs you have to deal with when assembling your PC. And no, it wasn't the extra memory or the SSD that pushed you over budget since you say those are compulsory components. It was the 670 that you wanted so much. If you can't fit it under $1,000, then just don't get the 670, get something worse or get a cheaper CPU with the 670. I understand going over budget by a few bucks, but $57, that's a pretty significant lapse in budgeting, in my mind.
Score
7
August 21, 2012 8:10:23 AM

mayankleoboy1i love how much difference a few months had on the performance.Just want to mention : i dont see the use of including an optical drive in 2012. i cant remember the last time i used an optical drive. And with digital sales outselling physical discs, i dont see why it is included. Its not about saving $15. Its about buying a part that you will be using less than a couple of times in an year.probably lesser.

Because it's needed. Need it to install Windows and certain software. Sometimes you can't avoid using the optical drive.
Score
15
August 21, 2012 8:12:59 AM

sterimarIn my opinion, you should stick to the budget, Tom's. Part of the fun (and the reality of the situation for most people) are the tradeoffs you have to deal with when assembling your PC. And no, it wasn't the extra memory or the SSD that pushed you over budget since you say those are compulsory components. It was the 670 that you wanted so much. If you can't fit it under $1,000, then just don't get the 670, get something worse or get a cheaper CPU with the 670. I understand going over budget by a few bucks, but $57, that's a pretty significant lapse in budgeting, in my mind.

But the SSD and RAM don't have much effect on the benchmarks preformed in the marathon. Those optional components are dead weight when it comes to the comparisons.
Score
0
Anonymous
August 21, 2012 8:44:44 AM

FokissedBut the SSD and RAM don't have much effect on the benchmarks preformed in the marathon. Those optional components are dead weight when it comes to the comparisons.

exactly. i get a few thumbs down from people that think a 60 gb SSD is worth it.

well what does it do?
boots windows faster thats it; a complete waste of $60 in terms of performance.

if its an advantage to install an SSD a minimum would be 120 gbs so at least all applications and games can be installed.
Score
1
August 21, 2012 8:48:10 AM

any PC built today needs an SSD. depending on your budget, choose the capacity. A PC cant be fast without removing the biggest bottleneck.
Score
8
August 21, 2012 9:00:26 AM

Again a build that is over limit and greedy, I regard $1000 as the basic enthusiast build and this doesn't reflect it adequately;

1] Fixation on 'k' chips is insane, the fact that I can run BF3 on a stock Thuban at well over 70 FPS with maxed presets is enough to suggest that $50 for the overclocking is actually not really needed.

2] Ivy bridge on a P67 setup, just to get a pretty board on a dead chipset, not only are you crimping the IB features you can settle on a Z77 UD5H from Gigabyte a far superior board.

3] GTX 670, a HD7850 can max out a game at HD res around 1080P why spend more?
Score
-5
August 21, 2012 9:20:02 AM

I don't know how someone could put such components in a crappy case like this !
Score
0
August 21, 2012 9:23:43 AM

For this tier the 7870/660ti/7950B should have been the criteria, that is a price range from $270 to $330 total savings of $70-130 which is more than sufficient.
Score
8
August 21, 2012 12:30:37 PM

I too am at a loss as to why anyone would put an Ivy Bridge processor on a P67 motherboard and not a Z77 instead. Kinda like putiing a brand new Hemi crate engine in an 84 ford van.
Score
11
August 21, 2012 1:22:03 PM

Regardless of the performance and price of the ASRock motherboard, if you have ever had to return an ASRock prooduct, suffice is to say that you'd never buy another product from them again. Their entire process as stated on their website for receiving warranty work is the most confusing I have ever had to deal with. It's almost as if it's that confusing, on purpose i.e. to keep the number of rma/warranty requests down.

Just say no to ASRock products until they change their warrany/rma process.
Score
2
August 21, 2012 1:23:59 PM

Personally I would have gone a AMD 7950 and used the saved money for a bigger and better SSD and possibly a better case too.
Score
-1
August 21, 2012 1:28:30 PM

Fokissed :

But the SSD and RAM don't have much effect on the benchmarks preformed in the marathon. Those optional components are dead weight when it comes to the comparisons.


Your dead wrong on the SSD becaue it does a lot more than just boot windows faster. The builder should have used a bigger SSD (minimum of 120GB).

I use my SSD for a select few games where load times are important or excruciatingly long on a HDD. Best example is Battlefield 3. On my HDD it took 3-5 minutes to load a map where now on my SSD it takes less than a minute sometimes even less than 30 seconds. The people I play with who are on HDD's can join a map and then I can join my friends after through battlelog after they have already started to load and be in the game playing (usually already died once) before they even get to the screen to choose their loadout!
Score
0
August 21, 2012 1:35:02 PM

Intel Core i5-3570K is a king of all builds ever for $230. Unlocked and 22nm. And yet everyone worries about Intel with no competition. I think Intel recognizes what the bread and butter price point is now. It's not $500-1000 top end CPU's. It's $225 ones.

4.6GHz overclock for free essentially... Unreal.

I would pony extra $20 for Z77 on the MB and maybe 660 Ti. A year from now, pick up another 660 Ti for $150-200 ... SLI and Xfire extend the life cycle... Love it.
Score
6
Anonymous
August 21, 2012 1:44:22 PM

Why not use the 60gig using Intels SMART CACHING? I have many friends who swear by it. Would it not also improve the performance of games as well?
Score
1
August 21, 2012 1:49:33 PM

I have no problem with the budget going over for decent stuff. Further I have no problems with the P67, BUT you need to verify the IB is supported AND the BIOS (UEFI) has the minimum BIOS revision to support the IB CPU otherwise it will NOT post.

My question is did the ASRock come with an IB supporting BIOS or did you need a donor CPU???
Score
-1
August 21, 2012 1:57:27 PM

Good build. A friend and i were planning a build with the same CPU+GPU combo, impressed to see how it does.

Perfect for 1080p.
Score
3
August 21, 2012 1:58:09 PM

jaquithI have no problem with the budget going over for decent stuff. Further I have no problems with the P67, BUT you need to verify the IB is supported AND the BIOS (UEFI) has the minimum BIOS revision to support the IB CPU otherwise it will NOT post. My question is did the ASRock come with an IB supporting BIOS or did you need a donor CPU???


READ

THE

ARTICLE
Score
10
August 21, 2012 2:00:16 PM

$180 - Z77 UD5H and $270 - 7870 would have not only saved it would be better representative of the $1000 build. It was almost as though they deliberately tried to fit a card that saturates half the budget and try piecemeal the rest around it into scant resources.

Score
0
August 21, 2012 2:04:23 PM

This build would be good for 1080p for the next few years.
Score
4
August 21, 2012 2:17:27 PM

basically someone who got that board and an IB, without having a SB in spare, is screwed.
He cant POST.
Score
1
August 21, 2012 2:18:45 PM

@jaquith: Don answered your no-post question in the article. He had to use a donor CPU.

The need for what jaquith calls a donor CPU should not be glossed over. I faced this once with a Foxconn A9DA board, and ended up having to purchase another (cheap) CPU just so I could upgrade the BIOS and use the parts I'd already paid for. The cost of that additional CPU should be included in the total system cost, less whatever it is selling for used on Ebay. Or, go through the MB vendor's RMA process, pay whatever shipping charges are involved, get them to flash it for you, and then include those additional costs in your total.

I'm disappointed in the over-budget expenditures. I like pushing the limit, but going this far over wasn't necessary. I suspect that the 660 Ti wasn't available when parts were ordered, or else I can't explain why you willingly went overbudget when you could have stayed under and gotten that card instead. It's clearly targeted at the mid-range enthusiast market, which is what this build is supposed to be. A 7950 could have also done an adequate job and kept you under budget.
Score
7
August 21, 2012 2:28:03 PM

So a person buys this and cannot POST without a buddy or vendor bailing him/her out, this is a complete fail for this month. Z77+3570k+7870/7950/660ti and probably save some extra too. The P67 was a total skimp just to fit in a GTX 670 when honestly a HD6850 still games well to over ambitious on a entry level mainstream build and went over budget.


Can see the $2000 with a X79+3960X and the rest bits and pieces.
Score
4
August 21, 2012 2:44:59 PM

This is a great build and it shows how far $1000 build has come. Perfect 1080p performance! Ruh roh, 2560 x 1600 is looking very good too, this system can handle a Catleap monitor for $300 more. That's $1300 for good 2560 x 1440 performance on a 27" IPS monitor. A great battle station we all can afford.

I'm not sure why 670 @ $400 instead of 7970 @$400. Especially since the 7970 can be flashed to a Ghz edition. Is it a thermal issue? Because that power supply is overkill for a 670. I'm not a huge fan of the P67 board choice like everyone else.
Score
2
August 21, 2012 3:02:04 PM

Imo 660Ti(MSI/PE version) + a larger SSD is better than the current Windforce 670+small SSD in overall sytem performance since you can get quality 120/128G ssd at the $120 range( Samsung 830) and will allow you to hit the budget target easier.
Score
0
August 21, 2012 3:02:22 PM

cknobmanREADTHE ARTICLE

First no surprise. It's frigging buried and not where I expected it to be, and it should be on the first page (WARNING) or by the MOBO info.

Deceptive Add $50+ to the build cost for anyone trying to copy this build. $10 TIM and $41 Intel Celeron G440 as a Donor CPU/RMA Shipping + Time/Repair Shop Costs.

Therefore, instead of that waste for 99.9999% of the people use a Z75/Z77 MOBO. The real total build cost is $100+ over the ($1000) budget.

Quote:
With our machine built, the only problem we ran into was an old UEFI version that didn't recognize our CPU. Fortunately, we anticipated this and had a Sandy Bridge-based chip on-hand to use for updating ASRock's platform. Surprisingly, the only firmware version we found on the company's support site was bundled in a Windows-based installer. So, we had to get the operating system up and running before we could swap in the Core i5-3570K.
Score
-3
August 21, 2012 3:09:12 PM

Ok, I've thought about this build for the last four+ hours. There's a lot to criticize, but I'd like to offer constructive ideas as well.
First of all, you busted the budget. Suggest what that extra money could buy, but stick to the budget. It is what defines the scale against which these machines are measured.
Second, I agree that a 60GB SSD just for the sake of meeting some artificial requirement for a SSD is pointless. Why not make it 32GB? Seriously, why not a Z68/Z77 and set up SRT?
Third, enough with the "academic" benchmark victories please. Measure minimum FPS, and everything over 60FPS counts the same, as they are essentially indiscernible. Feel free to give one point in a new category, "Future-resistance," for each title in which a minimum FPS of (e.g.) 70 is achieved; maybe another point if (e.g.) 90 is maintained. Otherwise, regardless of what the benchmarks say, if an experienced user cannot readily discern a difference in the playability of one system from another, disproportionate benchmark scores should not be permitted to give one of them a significant victory over the other. To that end, using a HD7870 would have taken care of the budget issues and allowed a selection of a current mobo and a reasonable SSD.
This build "felt" cobbled together, with a mix of old and new parts. I don't feel like I learned anything from it. If I win these parts, at the very least I'll use a 120GB SSD; very likely I'll also switch to a Z77 board.
Score
2
August 21, 2012 3:09:19 PM

It seems to me that you are "spreading the love" a little thin when you recommend a known problematic SSD to the exclusion of obviously superior competitors. Yes they cost a few dollars more but there are better places to save money.
Score
0
August 21, 2012 3:15:12 PM

I don't like the budget busting, because it's easy to bust a budget (especially if your not paying for it). I also don't like the p67 mobo. I would rather have a z77/b75 based mobo instead and spend $0-20 more than the p67 based mobo. I would also use a different GPU to make sure that I have either a bigger SSD and/or other parts and make sure I'm within the $1k budget.
Score
1
August 21, 2012 3:15:28 PM

This SBM is turning out very well so far!
Score
6
August 21, 2012 3:17:53 PM

Wow. I missed that the first time around. Tom's actually published a build where most of us would have to purchase a second CPU and install it first just to get it to post??? Seriously??? SHAME ON YOU!
Score
-2
August 21, 2012 3:25:31 PM

larsenexWhy not use the 60gig using Intels SMART CACHING? I have many friends who swear by it. Would it not also improve the performance of games as well?


Because they have a really foolish motherboard choice, and clearly should have went with a Z68 or Z77 motherboard. It wouldn't have added ANY extra price, or negatively effect the OC, while adding more features.... you know, like SSD smart caching.

LOL, the SSD was used as a boot drive instead. It's.... really bad.
Score
-2
August 21, 2012 3:27:21 PM

jtt283It is what defines the scale against which these machines are measured.Second, I agree that a 60GB SSD just for the sake of meeting some artificial requirement for a SSD is pointless. Why not make it 32GB? Seriously, why not a Z68/Z77 and set up SRT?


I really don't understand why more people don't use just a 60GB SSD with SRT. It completely removes the drive management restrictions, and makes pretty much everything you use on a regular basis near as fast as a straight up SSD. In my own testing I couldn't even notice the difference between booting off of my SSD vs Booting to an SRT'd spinning drive, and all my daily apps are in pretty much the same boat.
Score
2
August 21, 2012 3:44:25 PM

For those of us who dont have a loaner Sandy Bridge CPU laying around to get this kluged together build to post, take the cost of buying that loaner CPU (which wasn't included in the builds price tag!) and use it instead replace that P67 Mobo with the Gigabyte GA-Z77-DH3 mobo (which incorporates Viru MVP) and upgrade the 60GB SSD to a 120GB model. Then you have a build that makes sense. Lord knows the current build does not.
Score
0
August 21, 2012 3:45:15 PM

Actually, I have to say that I'm glad THG did this build the way they did. From an education standpoint, this build has a lot to say:

- Mobo choice matters. Choose poorly, and you can't boot
- Unlocked multipliers matter (if you OC)
- What SSD size (if any) is appropriate for a given budget, and how should it be configured (along with "Mobo choice, part 2: Mobo features matter")
- A cheap case can meet your needs, if your budget requires it

And the winner of this particular build will get a rockin' CPU and GPU with adequate RAM and functional HDD, ODD and SSD. They'll be able to swap in their own case, Mobo, etc. as desired so the core components they get offer maximum value.
Score
2
August 21, 2012 4:05:48 PM

Hmm..

The system is a great baseline. Could adjust it with a few parts.

You can get the i5 3570k for $189 plus a Z77 MB at Microcenter for lot less then newegg charges. Replace the CPU cooler with a CoolerMaster 212 EVO. Upgrade the video with a 7970.

Score
5
August 21, 2012 4:06:01 PM

jaquithFirst no surprise. It's frigging buried and not where I expected it to be, and it should be on the first page (WARNING) or by the MOBO info.Deceptive Add $50+ to the build cost for anyone trying to copy this build. $10 TIM and $41 Intel Celeron G440 as a Donor CPU/RMA Shipping + Time/Repair Shop Costs. Therefore, instead of that waste for 99.9999% of the people use a Z75/Z77 MOBO. The real total build cost is $100+ over the ($1000) budget.


I completely agree with the stupid logic behind the MOBO choice especially if "Johnny" @ home was trying to replicate this. Who on earth buys a freaking motherboard that does not support your proc out of the box???????????

There is no valid reason why the builder should not have used a Z77.
Score
2
August 21, 2012 4:31:56 PM

I personally like the build, though it does go over budget it lays a foundation to build off it. From personally looking you might add +25/30 to MB and i would up the memory to 16GB's all in all even after considering the OS the price comes around $1200 and in reality i paid wayy more for a build back in 2005 that only played games at 1280x1024 on medium settings so people just need to lay off the budget thing and get real this is a mad machine with tons of power.
Score
0
!