Solved

Reseat CPU Without changing thermal paste?

Hi, I currently have a AM3 Phenom II X4 840T CPU, and think about getting this Motherboard "http://www.newegg.ca/Product/Product.aspx?Item=13-131-657", it is cheap but anything is better than my current OEM Mobo.

I know that to remove an CPU, you need to remove the heatsink and the thermal paste too (then clean it and re-apply a new one), but I was wondering if there was a way to remove the CPU still attached to the heatsink together (with the thermal paste of course), and transfer it to another motherboard?

Is that possible without using machines or specialized tools?

Also, I have a unbranded thermal paste right now but it is a really cheap (around 2$) bought at an small electronic store. Does the quality of the thermal paste matter? Do I really need a Carbon or Metal-based thermal paste like the Arctic Silver 5?

-Thanks in advance. :)
16 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about reseat changing thermal paste
  1. There are real quality differences in thermal pastes. Just google for thermal paste roundup.

    Why not just spring for the 10 or 12 dollars and buy a tube of the good stuff. It's not like it's alot of money.
  2. WOuldnt advise trying to remove your CPU with the cooler on top cause it wont have anything to hold it, cept the paste. If it falls while you are moving it, goodbye CPU cause the pins are very fragile. Arctic Silver is dirt cheap even if you have to order it online. It doesnt pay to be lazy with it. Clean it off, and reapply before you reattach the CPU cooler any other way and its just foolish.
  3. dude, you have a $100 processor a $80 mobo but you wanna skimp on $10 for thermal paste?
  4. Nope, best not to even try. Good chance you'll just bend pins on the cpu.

    Thermal paste quality matters little unless you plan to overclock, otherwise just use what you have.
  5. lucuis said:
    Nope, best not to even try. Good chance you'll just bend pins on the cpu.

    Thermal paste quality matters little unless you plan to overclock, otherwise just use what you have.


    YEAH you can even use, mayonnaise, lipstick, mustard, toothpaste and butter!
    just stay away from using chocolate, worse than non at all :p

    http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/article/Thermal-Compound-Roundup-January-2012/1468/5
  6. So I don't have a chance to successfully remove the CPU with the Heatsink?

    Then do you guys have tips to how to remove properly the old thermal paste, since with my old computer (circa 2001), the temps went up 8C after that I changed the Thermal Paste. :fou:

    We definitively need to go back to the old days of the Slot-Sockets... (Just like the Pentium II.)

    Thanks again! :)
  7. Anonymous said:


    Nice article, really worth reading. :D

    Anonymous said:
    YEAH you can even use, mayonnaise, lipstick, mustard, toothpaste and butter!
    just stay away from using chocolate, worse than non at all :p


    Mustard with Butter? :lol:
  8. Best answer
    bloc97 said:
    So I don't have a chance to successfully remove the CPU with the Heatsink?

    Then do you guys have tips to how to remove properly the old thermal paste, since with my old computer (circa 2001), the temps went up 8C after that I changed the Thermal Paste.

    Thanks again! :)


    to clean, i like the rubbing alcohol and coffee filter method.

    to apply new, here is an article on the same site that lists the various methods and tests them:
    http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/article/How-To-Correctly-Apply-Thermal-Grease/274
  9. Anonymous said:
    to clean, i like the rubbing alcohol and coffee filter method.

    to apply new, here is an article on the same site that lists the various methods and tests them:
    http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/article/How-To-Correctly-Apply-Thermal-Grease/274


    Nice article again. :D

    But what % of Alcohol do you recommend? 50%, 70%, 90% or 99%?
  10. 70% or better preferrably.

    Also, I'm going to run counter to prevailing wisdom and say it's not really a problem to respread the old stuff and use it over again. As long as you can spread it out to get good even coverage then there's no reason it won't be fine. It might not be best practice and it is slightly risky, but so it applying your own thermal paste from scratch.

    I've done this a couple of times on my own systems with no ill effects. Just pay attention to what your doing and use common sense. If you can't get good coverage or the old stuff is dried out then it's time for new stuff.
  11. use the 70% alcool to clean and get new paste then you will be shure that contact with the cpu and cooler is good so prevent overheathing an save a lot of headhache
  12. bloc97 said:
    Nice article again. :D

    But what % of Alcohol do you recommend? 50%, 70%, 90% or 99%?


    atleast 100 proof!

    oh sorry wrong kind . . 90% is best. 70% suffices.
  13. 87ninefiveone said:
    70% or better preferrably.

    Also, I'm going to run counter to prevailing wisdom and say it's not really a problem to respread the old stuff and use it over again. As long as you can spread it out to get good even coverage then there's no reason it won't be fine. It might not be best practice and it is slightly risky, but so it applying your own thermal paste from scratch.

    I've done this a couple of times on my own systems with no ill effects. Just pay attention to what your doing and use common sense. If you can't get good coverage or the old stuff is dried out then it's time for new stuff.


    i just do not get it. people spend hundreds of dollars on a cpu but will short change $10. or maybe your talking about some "found at the curb" junk.
  14. Thanks guys, I am going to buy an cheap small bottle of isopropyl alcohol tomorrow, and use my current thermal paste.

    Ugh... Maby it is time to look at liquid-cooling solutions... Hate having over 30C at Idle.
  15. Best answer selected by bloc97.
  16. Anonymous said:
    i just do not get it. people spend hundreds of dollars on a cpu but will short change $10. or maybe your talking about some "found at the curb" junk.


    Well, in my case it was usually on old Dell or HP systems that I was playing around with, but I don't think I'd hesitate to the same to my current 2600K/Z68 system even though I have 2-3 tubes of AS5 on hand. Maybe it's laziness? Like I said though, I've never had a problem.
Ask a new question

Read More

CPUs Thermal Compound Motherboards