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I5 2500K or i7 2600K

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February 25, 2012 11:09:00 AM

Hey,

I've read a few articles and a lot of people says that the i5 and the i7 are quite similar when it comes to gaming. so what do you guys think should I get the i5 instead of the i7. And if not. Why not? The price difference is about €80. But is it worth it?

Regards,
Brian



More about : 2500k 2600k

February 25, 2012 11:19:09 AM

Not much of a difference. The i7 has HT and a litle more cache, but Hyperthreading is useless for almost all modern games. The larger amount of cache is somewhat useful, but it's not worth the price.

I would recommend getting the i5 and using that €80 for a better GPU, motherboard or cooling system.
a b à CPUs
February 25, 2012 11:27:10 AM

As he said, it's not worth for gaming, but when you actually work with your PC. And that means heavy video editing, 3D modelling, etc. And even then the i5 is sufficient.
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a b à CPUs
February 25, 2012 11:27:48 AM

Not really worth it, that 80 euros can be spent on graphics. Hyperthreading which makes i7-2600k's core like 8, does not benefit in games. So the gaming performance will be similar. The performance differs when you do rendering though, say Cinema 4D, but sice you're on gaming, like I said before, use that 80 euros for graphics. If you are worrying about bottlenecks, since the performance is the same their both 'bottleneck levels' are the same too. They should be fine up to 6990 at stock speeds.
February 25, 2012 11:49:50 AM

refillable said:
Not really worth it, that 80 euros can be spent on graphics. Hyperthreading which makes i7-2600k's core like 8, does not benefit in games. So the gaming performance will be similar. The performance differs when you do rendering though, say Cinema 4D, but sice you're on gaming, like I said before, use that 80 euros for graphics. If you are worrying about bottlenecks, since the performance is the same their both 'bottleneck levels' are the same too. They should be fine up to 6990 at stock speeds.

And if I want to Crossfire the HD7970 in the future? Will it Bottleneck?
February 25, 2012 12:29:08 PM

Firewood B B said:
And if I want to Crossfire the HD7970 in the future? Will it Bottleneck?

probably not, but remember it will overclock a fair way with a good cooler
a c 99 à CPUs
February 25, 2012 12:33:21 PM

The best way to put into words is what you do with your computer some think the extra 2mb of cache on the 2600K is worth it but that extra cache is somehow tied to the hyper threading capabilities and can also be a worthless limiting factor if you ever plan on overclocking.

If you have any overclocking intentions go with the 2500K, it is a more consistent across the board overclocker from most experiences overclocking between the 2 CPUs reported by others, out here in the forums.

Some have reported being able to leave hyper threading enabled on the 2600K while overclocking but experienced peculiarities at not being able to overclock certain multiplier levels, my 2500K will overclock to any multiplier level I choose, just supply the right Vcore and you're there.

Gaming wise hyper threading is no advantage, the only apps hyper threading has an edge on are the apps that can fully take advantage of it, hyper threading is really more hype than it's actual capability anyway, to me it's a useless added expense, that splits a cores total capability.
February 25, 2012 12:49:01 PM

4Ryan6 said:
The best way to put into words is what you do with your computer some think the extra 2mb of cache on the 2600K is worth it but that extra cache is somehow tied to the hyper threading capabilities and can also be a worthless limiting factor if you ever plan on overclocking.

If you have any overclocking intentions go with the 2500K, it is a more consistent across the board overclocker from most experiences overclocking between the 2 CPUs reported by others, out here in the forums.

Some have reported being able to leave hyper threading enabled on the 2600K while overclocking but experienced peculiarities at not being able to overclock certain multiplier levels, my 2500K will overclock to any multiplier level I choose, just supply the right Vcore and you're there.

Gaming wise hyper threading is no advantage, the only apps hyper threading has an edge on are the apps that can fully take advantage of it, hyper threading is really more hype than it's actual capability anyway, to me it's a useless added expense, that splits a cores total capability.

Okay, And yes I'm planning on overclocking this CPU. I've never overclocked a CPU but I think there are a lot of guides on the internet because the i5 2500K is quite a populair CPU
a b à CPUs
February 25, 2012 1:26:46 PM

7970 Crossfire with some overclocks Technically should be fine. If you are looking to overclock your i5-2500k, there is a lot of tutorial in the web.
a c 99 à CPUs
February 25, 2012 1:40:25 PM

Firewood B B said:
Okay, And yes I'm planning on overclocking this CPU. I've never overclocked a CPU but I think there are a lot of guides on the internet because the i5 2500K is quite a populair CPU


Seeing as how I live in the overclocking section here, Literally, I see all the complaints and solutions through observing posts and getting PMs, the key to 2500K overclocking is deciding on the overclocking route best for you and go for it, don't halfway do it, Do It!

There are different routes to overclocking the 2500K some want to run all Intels features and according to them overclock, which to me is a joke, that's not really overclocking the CPU, you may as well just Auto Overclock if that's the route you want.

My overclock method is to disable all Intels features and overclock all 4 cores of the 2500K to whatever speed you want to run the CPU at with the cooling capability you'll be using, that's disabling turbo boost and using complete BIOS overclocking.

My guide in in my sig.

With good after market air cooling you can reach 45x or 4500mhz and attain a 24/7 stability, to go beyond 4500mhz there is really zero gaming increase unless you are running FX10, on of my friends claims he has experienced increased gaming performance in Flight Simulator 10, every other game I have tested like Crysis2 for example has no increase.

My friend has supplied no direct evidence to back his FX10 claims so until he does, his claims are doodly squat, so take that info for what it is, not confirmed, and I don't have FX10, to test it myself or I would, but since FX10 was CPU and memory intensive, it could be true?

The reason I'm sharing this with you is there's no real benefit going past 4500mhz for the trade off of increased voltage and heat to get to say 5000ghz, and I have overclocked mine to 5100mhz 24/7 stable, but I have an extremely good water cooling solution to do that.


February 25, 2012 1:40:38 PM

refillable said:
7970 Crossfire with some overclocks Technically should be fine. If you are looking to overclock your i5-2500k, there is a lot of tutorial in the web.

Do you maybe know how much wattage HD 7970 CrossFire use?
February 25, 2012 4:26:06 PM

the i5 2500K kinda pushed the i7 2500K/2600K outta the market.
February 25, 2012 4:38:53 PM

Quote:
true.
the 2700K was not worth the extra coin for the .1GHz anyways over the 2600K..
I just answered a few PM's with people just going 2100 / Z68 and wait for money for 2500K or Ivy.
me, I'm good till Haswell before I jump again..
(unless I get the bug too and find hell of sale)..

me personally it's more about upgrading to SATA3 drives from my SATA2 and then checkin' out Kepler
to see what it's about...

Kelper will not be all that great at best it will be just a bit faster than 7970 and cost a whole lot more but then again if the claims everyone is making are true Nvidia will have to put out a single GPU with the performance of the Mars II GTX 580 and I don't see it happening and I can guarantee it wont. Nvidia needs a die shrink and price drop to be competitive with Radeon.
!