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Which 1155 Intel Processor should I get?

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February 25, 2012 2:51:35 PM

Hey guys!
This is my first post here, as I have been able to pretty much get the information I have needed by just searching and reading. However, now I need some help. I am building a new computer and have everything on the way, except for the processor.
So far, I have ordered:
Asus p8z68 -v pro/Gen3
G.skill 8gb Ram

Already have:
750w ThermalTake PS
MSI 6770 Video card

I am going to be mainly using the computer for playing SW:TOR. I may also try to get into something a bit more graphics intensive as soon as I find a first person shooter that I like. I am also the kind of person that keeps a computer for a long time, my last CPU/mobo upgrade was in 2007. I usually make small improvements here and there as I go, until I need to step up the next processor platform. What I need to know is this: what processor would be best for me? I had kind of decided on a i5-2500k but don't know if quad core is too much for what I do, or would it be good to get, as it won't become obsolete so quickly. I am using a graphics card, so I don't care for the integrated graphics and, if I am not doing any video conversion, do I need the integrated graphics at all? Am I missing something there? Does it do more than provide display graphics and help with video conversions? Thank you all for any help you can provide, sorry for the wordy question. :) 

Oh and another question,
I run dual displays, a 19" and a 32". Would it be possible to run the 19" off of the onboard GPU and use the video card for video on the 32"(I usually run the desktop and IE on the 19 and movies/games on the 32"). I figure that would take the load off the graphics card, but don't know if I can do both simultaneously.

More about : 1155 intel processor

February 25, 2012 3:08:15 PM

i5-2500k is a good choice, go with it. Your last question would largely base on your graphics card.
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February 25, 2012 3:11:45 PM

i would say i5 2500k. are you going to be overclocking?
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a c 315 à CPUs
February 25, 2012 4:00:59 PM

Today, the 2500K is a no brainer for gaming. Particularly as a long term purchase.

The Z68 based motherboard you bought will allow multiplier overclocking, making the default 3.3 into a 4.0-4.5 cpu. Keep that option open.

I think you could attach the side monitor to the motherboard graphics out ports.

In reality, connecting two monitors to a single discrete card does not seem to make any difference.
I have tried it using a cheap second discrete card to no avail.
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a c 146 à CPUs
February 25, 2012 4:05:04 PM

No question, the I5 2500k. Price to performance the I5 is one of the best especially for gaming.
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a c 315 à CPUs
February 25, 2012 4:08:16 PM

The 2500K does not need a super cooler to do the job, short of a record level overclock.

If you can find a 1155 adapter for your cooler, then fine.

Otherwise, $30 buys you a CM hyper212, or Xigmatek gaia which will be plenty cool and quiet.
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February 25, 2012 4:30:47 PM

I appreciate the good advice. I was going to buy the 2500 from newegg, which is where all my other stuff generally comes from. On newegg with free shipping the chip is $224.00, their free shipping is really slow. I found that The CompUSA near me has the chip in stock for $219, so that's where I'll be buying my chip at. In the next few weeks I'm looking to buy a 128gb SSD and 64 bit windows 7.
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a c 315 à CPUs
February 25, 2012 4:35:42 PM

There is a difference between the 2500 and the 2500K. A big one. You want the 2500K!
If you are near a microcenter, you can buy a 2500K for $180, check that out if you can.

When you buy a SSD, look first to Intel or Samsung 830. They seem to be the most trouble free. Be prepared to pay a bit more for them.
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February 25, 2012 4:47:07 PM

Yes, definitely the 2500k, didn't realize there was a 2500non-k. :) 
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February 25, 2012 4:48:44 PM

What else does the integrated GPU do for you if you aren't using the onboard GPU and you won't be using your computer for any video encoding?
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February 25, 2012 4:49:16 PM

There is absolutely no need to run your monitors with seperate video cards. It takes absolutely no power whatsoever to display a static desktop, and displaying the same thing to both displays does not impact anything whatsoever. If you were to, say, run a video on the 19" while playing a game on the 32", well that might impact it somewhat, but it may affect the CPU as much as the video card, so it's still rather moot.

Man, I didn't realize how lucky I am to have a Microcenter near me. The 2500k and 2600k are like $50 cheaper than any of the big online retailers. That's crazy. But yes, make sure it is the K!! version.
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February 25, 2012 4:54:01 PM

DieselDan said:
What else does the integrated GPU do for you if you aren't using the onboard GPU and you won't be using your computer for any video encoding?


Nothing. What does onboard sound of a motherboard do for you if you're using a Sound Blaster? Nothing.
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Anonymous
a b à CPUs
February 25, 2012 4:54:47 PM

DieselDan said:

Oh and another question,
I run dual displays, a 19" and a 32". Would it be possible to run the 19" off of the onboard GPU and use the video card for video on the 32"(I usually run the desktop and IE on the 19 and movies/games on the 32"). I figure that would take the load off the graphics card, but don't know if I can do both simultaneously.


yes. in your BIOS you can configure which graphics you want for your main display. either PEG/iGPU or iGPU/PEG; discrete would be the PEG. (Pci-Express Graphics)
heard that you need to enable multi monitor set up for your iGPU, i did that even though i truely do not know it to be necessary.
then in windows, with both monitors attached, right click on your desktop, screen resolution and then extend desktop to this display.

btw, personally i like having the cabling to the back of my box not clumped together and if i am having a problem with my monitor, i have already isolated what the problem could be. but really its a person choice. though i think if you have it, then use it :) 
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a c 315 à CPUs
February 25, 2012 5:15:43 PM

DieselDan said:
What else does the integrated GPU do for you if you aren't using the onboard GPU and you won't be using your computer for any video encoding?

Nothing, really.

If you have a discrete gpu problem, then having the integrated gpu available for diagnostics mught be of help.
Intel has you covered with a slightly higher clocked 2550K withoug the integrated gpu.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

To my mind, it is worthless, particularly at a higher price since nobody is going to run it at stock anyway.
If you find one at a lower price, then great.
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March 3, 2012 2:10:32 AM

Best answer selected by DieselDan.
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