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Changing CPU process priority

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February 25, 2012 5:07:36 PM

Will my games or programs run faster if I change the CPU process priority to HIGH or Realtime?
a b à CPUs
February 25, 2012 5:12:17 PM

Hi :) 

Short answer...NO....

All the best Brett :) 
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Anonymous
a b à CPUs
February 25, 2012 5:17:56 PM

i have tried to speed up encoding by changing its priority, it actually slowed it down :( 

then i thought: how do i know better than my cpu how to run a program?
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February 25, 2012 6:31:26 PM

Anonymous said:
i have tried to speed up encoding by changing its priority, it actually slowed it down :( 

then i thought: how do i know better than my cpu how to run a program?


Are you sure?
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a c 185 à CPUs
February 25, 2012 7:41:41 PM

Well not really. It just comes down to your processors architecture and it's clock speed. If you are looking to run your stuff faster in terms of loading get an ssd, but if you are encoding/rendering I suggest if you can overclock.
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Anonymous
a b à CPUs
February 25, 2012 10:35:48 PM

clairvoyant christopher said:
Are you sure?


yes i am. i was watching the time.
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February 26, 2012 11:54:16 AM

Anonymous said:
yes i am. i was watching the time.


I just tried switching the priority to Realtime on Internet Explorer & it did seem to go faster, Why did it work out better?
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Anonymous
a b à CPUs
February 26, 2012 4:05:02 PM

clairvoyant christopher said:
I just tried switching the priority to Realtime on Internet Explorer & it did seem to go faster, Why did it work out better?


IDK, i don't use IE, i use waterfox FTW!

if you really want to unnecessarily stress out your cpu by changing priorities then go for it. it will make other services and programs slow down; your cpu has only so much processing power. if you are multi tasking and you increase the priority on one program it will affect the others.

as an example; if you change the priority of a game, the game may seem faster but it will affect your inputs such as keyboard and mouse (they need your cpu too) and actually slow down your gameplay.

WARNING! plagiarized content!

all you've done is ensure that other processes than your game get smaller slices of cpu. as a result, the computer spends more time pre-empting tasks, refilling caches, and doing other housekeeping duties involved in enforcing the priority rules. less CPU to go around means less performance.

raising a task's priority to "make it go faster" is a newbie mistake/myth. as you see, it doesn't work. all you've done is made the other tasks less efficient, causing them to need more cpu time to get their work done.
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February 26, 2012 4:56:18 PM

Anonymous said:
IDK, i don't use IE, i use waterfox FTW!

if you really want to unnecessarily stress out your cpu by changing priorities then go for it. it will make other services and programs slow down; your cpu has only so much processing power. if you are multi tasking and you increase the priority on one program it will affect the others.

as an example; if you change the priority of a game, the game may seem faster but it will affect your inputs such as keyboard and mouse (they need your cpu too) and actually slow down your gameplay.

WARNING! plagiarized content!

all you've done is ensure that other processes than your game get smaller slices of cpu. as a result, the computer spends more time pre-empting tasks, refilling caches, and doing other housekeeping duties involved in enforcing the priority rules. less CPU to go around means less performance.

raising a task's priority to "make it go faster" is a newbie mistake/myth. as you see, it doesn't work. all you've done is made the other tasks less efficient, causing them to need more cpu time to get their work done.


doesn't it depend on what kind of CPU you have? I have the i7920 CPU.
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Anonymous
a b à CPUs
February 26, 2012 5:03:51 PM

clairvoyant christopher said:
doesn't it depend on what kind of CPU you have? I have the i7920 CPU.


that cpu is an extremely good gaming cpu and does not need to be messed with.

the only difference is a low end cpu would bog down even more and run much, much worse.

it does not matter if your motherboard is blue or your ram is red; it is what it is.

did you finish your homework?
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February 26, 2012 5:09:17 PM

Anonymous said:
that cpu is an extremely good gaming cpu and does not need to be messed with.

the only difference is a low end cpu would bog down even more and run much, much worse.

it does not matter if your motherboard is blue or your ram is red; it is what it is.

did you finish your homework?


Yes. Look what I found on the internet:

Briefly it causes the Windows scheduler to allocate more or less CPU time to the process.

A higher priority only gives improved performance if it's competing with other processes. e.g. suppose you start a video rendering job and you see in task manager that it's getting, oh, 97% of the CPU time. (And Task manager itself often takes a percent or three.) Raising its priority under those conditions won't do a thing - it's already getting all the CPU there is. it's like being allowed to go to the head of the line when there's no one else in line.

Changing priority does not directly affect RAM or any other hardware resource other than CPU time. However, if of two competing processes one gets a lot more CPU time than the other, the one using more CPU time will (assuming everyting else is equal) end up being assigned more RAM simply because it's accessing more of its code and data in a given amount of time.
Source(s):
"Windows Internals" by Solomon and Russinovich. See the chapter on scheduling.
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Anonymous
a b à CPUs
February 26, 2012 5:55:39 PM

clairvoyant christopher said:
Yes. Look what I found on the internet:

Briefly it causes the Windows scheduler to allocate more or less CPU time to the process.

A higher priority only gives improved performance if it's competing with other processes. e.g. suppose you start a video rendering job and you see in task manager that it's getting, oh, 97% of the CPU time. (And Task manager itself often takes a percent or three.) Raising its priority under those conditions won't do a thing - it's already getting all the CPU there is. it's like being allowed to go to the head of the line when there's no one else in line.

Changing priority does not directly affect RAM or any other hardware resource other than CPU time. However, if of two competing processes one gets a lot more CPU time than the other, the one using more CPU time will (assuming everyting else is equal) end up being assigned more RAM simply because it's accessing more of its code and data in a given amount of time.
Source(s):
"Windows Internals" by Solomon and Russinovich. See the chapter on scheduling.


1) just because it is on the internet does not make it true.
2) just because it is published does not make it true. (publishers publish to make money)

re-read what you posted.
"A higher priority only gives improved performance if it's competing with other processes."

he then states that if there is nothing else running its useless to give it a higher priority.
"Raising its priority under those conditions won't do a thing - it's already getting all the CPU there is. it's like being allowed to go to the head of the line when there's no one else in line."

he said: "Changing priority does not directly affect RAM or any other hardware resource other than CPU time."

but then he contradicts himself:
"However, if of two competing processes one gets a lot more CPU time than the other, the one using more CPU time will (assuming everyting else is equal) end up being assigned more RAM simply because it's accessing more of its code and data in a given amount of time."

which says changing the priority of a process, game, program, task, affects the performance of other tasks.

look at your Task Manager and look at the processes; those need resources from the cpu. take it away or lessen it and your "performance" as a whole will suffer.

ie. you are playing a game online, MW3, and you give iw5mp.exe high priority. you may see an increase 5-7 FPS and think "wow, this is GREAT!" but your network connection to the servers will suffer because it is not getting the resources to run effectively because iw5mp.exe is using them. also what you say or hear on your headset will lag because the audio codecs are not getting their resources as they should.

there are a lot of tasks and services needed to run one program, when you allocate their priority to that executable, program, then those services and tasks suffer.

and because elephants have flat feet :) 
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a c 185 à CPUs
February 26, 2012 8:22:03 PM

Your 920 begs to be overclocked, also this would depend on hard drive speed.
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February 26, 2012 10:17:42 PM

amuffin said:
Your 920 begs to be overclocked, also this would depend on hard drive speed.


I can't overclock because my bios is locked.I have a Dell Studio XPS 435t.
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August 13, 2013 9:41:28 AM

clairvoyant christopher said:
Will my games or programs run faster if I change the CPU process priority to HIGH or Realtime?


Yes and no, I run Star Wars the Old Republic in real time with much faster response times and no fallout. However it might not work with all games and software because certain software may require that it runs a long process, such as data mining, and you will lose response time to keyboard, mouse, and sound etc. However it does not hurt to give it a try, most of my single games run in real time with better improvement. I have a core i5 with 4gb ram, beats audio etc. Everything runs great when I have games on real time. The only thing that isn't great is when I have to work and data mine, then I get keyboard and mouse problems/jerkiness.
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