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question about portrait poses

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Anonymous
April 26, 2005 7:05:01 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Hi All

OK, a photo shot from straight on is full frontal, from the side is
profile

But what about from off center of the font. Is this 3/4 profile?

And what about from just off center of the rear?

TA!

DG
Anonymous
April 26, 2005 10:32:27 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <1114553101.341695.130630@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com>,
<digiboy@mailinator.com> wrote:

> OK, a photo shot from straight on is full frontal, from the side is
> profile
>
> But what about from off center of the font. Is this 3/4 profile?
>
> And what about from just off center of the rear?

There are only 5 positions to properly photograph the human face.
Anything else is a distortion.

1 Full frontal with equal distance from the edge of the eyes to the
side of the head.

2. Profile from each side with exactly half of the face being
photographed - no part of the far eye showing.

3. Two-thirds angle with the edge of the eye just touching the edge of
the face.

From there, it's a matter of the proper lighting (generally with the
side of the face toward the camera in shadow).
Anonymous
April 27, 2005 1:52:09 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

(Thinks - does everything have to have a name? (O;)

I'm intrigued why you think there are only 5 positions - is this like
saying everything must be on the thirds? (O; Distortion is NOT the
right word. Distortion happens when you are too close to the person,
or shoot through wavy glass or into a curved mirror...

It is true that those poses generally give the best (conventional)
results, but rules are meant to be broken, and many of the portrait
photography geniuses of our time got brilliant results by breaking with
convention.

>..Two-thirds angle with the edge of the eye just touching the edge of
the face.

I prefer to think of this as `keep the nose in front of their face`!
If you let the person's nose `escape`, it can be rather unflattering
and draw attention to the wrong item..
Related resources
Anonymous
April 27, 2005 9:46:12 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <1114577529.350808.226310@l41g2000cwc.googlegroups.com>,
<chrlz@go.com> wrote:

> I'm intrigued why you think there are only 5 positions - is this like
> saying everything must be on the thirds? (O; Distortion is NOT the
> right word. Distortion happens when you are too close to the person,
> or shoot through wavy glass or into a curved mirror...

You gotta know the rules before you can break them.
April 27, 2005 1:37:50 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

<digiboy@mailinator.com> wrote in message
news:1114553101.341695.130630@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com...
> Hi All
>
> OK, a photo shot from straight on is full frontal, from the side is
> profile
>
> But what about from off center of the font. Is this 3/4 profile?
>
> And what about from just off center of the rear?
>
> TA!
>
> DG

Hi there.

I always associate the description "Full Frontal" with Nudes which include
pubic hair. For portraits "Full Face" is better.

As you have heard there are "Rules" about portraits, and there are lots of
them, which cover backgrounds, lighting balance, etc, etc.

If you want to take Commercial portraits, then these rules are quite useful,
and most of the pictures sold will conform to them. Note that I said
"useful" and "most", there will always be exceptions.

If however you want to do something a bit more creative, and are not being
paid to produce a "Good Likeness" or "Portrait", then just forget about any
rules, and try for that different look If you like the result, that is all
that matters.

Roy G
Anonymous
April 27, 2005 6:09:43 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On 4/26/05 11:52 PM, in article
1114577529.350808.226310@l41g2000cwc.googlegroups.com, "chrlz@go.com"
<chrlz@go.com> wrote:

> (Thinks - does everything have to have a name? (O;)
>
> I'm intrigued why you think there are only 5 positions - is this like
> saying everything must be on the thirds? (O; Distortion is NOT the
> right word. Distortion happens when you are too close to the person,
> or shoot through wavy glass or into a curved mirror...
>
> It is true that those poses generally give the best (conventional)
> results, but rules are meant to be broken, and many of the portrait
> photography geniuses of our time got brilliant results by breaking with
> convention.
>
>> ..Two-thirds angle with the edge of the eye just touching the edge of
> the face.
>
> I prefer to think of this as `keep the nose in front of their face`!
> If you let the person's nose `escape`, it can be rather unflattering
> and draw attention to the wrong item..
>
The question specifically was about *portrait* poses. And I would agree
with the answer that there only 5 positions. That said, there are many
great photographs of people taken from other than these 5 basic positions
but, these would fall more into the category of a documentary photo than a
traditional portrait.
Chuck
Anonymous
April 28, 2005 11:08:20 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <1114721845.434631.244900@l41g2000cwc.googlegroups.com>,
<digiboy@mailinator.com> wrote:

> the pose I'm looking for a name for is shown nicely in the (oil
> painting) On The Rocks by Paul Roberts whch is here
> http://www.plusonegallery.com/current-exhibition.htm

Oh, that would be the back of the head. Not a real hot seller to the
general public.
Anonymous
April 29, 2005 12:04:13 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Not fussed about whether it sells or not, what I like is up to me :) 

But I don't think this counts as back of the head since I can see
further round than that



Randall Ainsworth wrote:
> In article <1114721845.434631.244900@l41g2000cwc.googlegroups.com>,
> <digiboy@mailinator.com> wrote:
>
> > the pose I'm looking for a name for is shown nicely in the (oil
> > painting) On The Rocks by Paul Roberts whch is here
> > http://www.plusonegallery.com/current-exhibition.htm
>
> Oh, that would be the back of the head. Not a real hot seller to the
> general public.
April 30, 2005 3:22:17 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

<digiboy@mailinator.com> wrote in message
news:1114787053.828142.70150@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
> Not fussed about whether it sells or not, what I like is up to me :) 
>
> But I don't think this counts as back of the head since I can see
> further round than that
>
>
>
> Randall Ainsworth wrote:
>> In article <1114721845.434631.244900@l41g2000cwc.googlegroups.com>,
>> <digiboy@mailinator.com> wrote:
>>
>> > the pose I'm looking for a name for is shown nicely in the (oil
>> > painting) On The Rocks by Paul Roberts whch is here
>> > http://www.plusonegallery.com/current-exhibition.htm
>>
>> Oh, that would be the back of the head. Not a real hot seller to the
>> general public.
>

Probably not a great pose for a Commercial Type Portrait.

If you must have a title for the pose, I would describe it as 3 quarter
back.

It is not too good for just a head and shoulder type portrait, but is good
for sitting or kneeling shots.

The advantage is that your model can keep her face out of the picture, if
she is a bit worried about being recognised when she is topless or nude. I
have actually used that type of pose quite few times, and have sold some
prints.

The very first time I used it, the model was not very keen on the resulting
print, but her Mum, Dad and Gran thought it was great. I must add that she
was wearing trousers and very little boob was on view. It did rather well
in Photo Competitions in the mid 80s.

Roy G
!