Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Bittorrent & firewalls

Last response: in Networking
Share
May 12, 2005 8:32:40 AM

I just set up my bro with a wireless ADSL Modem/Router/Firewall type thingy, and all works fine now apart from bittorrent.

Torrents work, but they always stay yellow, which apparently means they're not receiving any incoming connections - apparently this is what happens when a firewall is blocking them.

However, apparently Bittorrent uses ports 6881 to 6999, and I've configured the firewall to Allow ports 6881 - 6889 through to his pc.

He has zonealarm, but that's not interfering, as killing it doesn't help. If he plugs his old USB modem in, it's all fine.

He's using a Netgear 834G wireless router. I've had to set these up on Customer's Sites to allow us to remotely access their pcs via PcAnywhere, and allow The firebird database server to accept connections, so I'm pretty sure I know what I'm doing there.

The router has the latest version of firmware...

I'll have to go back and fiddle at some point, but here's all I was thinking:
1)I haven't tried seeing what it's like if it's wired, rather than wireless between the router and PC, although I can't see that making much difference, to be honest.
2)I've just had a thought that I think it's not set up to accept and respond to 'ping' requests... I seem to recall having to set that on a customer's one before our software could make connections... hmmm...

Any other thoughts?

---
<font color=red>"Life is <i>not</i> like a box of chocolates. It's more like a jar of jalapeńos - what you do today might burn your a<b></b>ss tommorrow."

More about : bittorrent firewalls

May 12, 2005 1:35:42 PM

Regarding #2.. routers normally have something like "Block WAN Request" which blocks the router from getting pinged.. if that's what you were looking for.

Try putting his comptuer in the DMZ, just to see if it's a feature of the router causing the problem.
If that doesn't help, you're looking at either the wireless connection or a possible defective router.
May 12, 2005 4:28:02 PM

I've seen the setting before - I think it's called 'enable ICMP echo traffic' or something.

I've had to set it for a couple of customers on this router, so I know where it is. It just didn't occur to me that it might be the problem until I was halfway through the post.

I don't like the idea of him being in the DMZ, but I think he wants to run ZoneAlarm anyway, so I probably might as well really.

---
<font color=red>"Life is <i>not</i> like a box of chocolates. It's more like a jar of jalapeńos - what you do today might burn your a<b></b>ss tommorrow."
Related resources
May 20, 2005 9:32:06 AM

Well, the only thing that actually worked was setting his PC up as a DMZ. He's still got firewall software running, so it's no biggie.

I was kinda hoping to set him up with a hardware firewall, but at least this way He'll stop moaning :eek:  ..

---
<font color=red>"Life is <i>not</i> like a box of chocolates. It's more like a jar of jalapeńos - what you do today might burn your a<b></b>ss tommorrow."
May 20, 2005 12:54:45 PM

Haven't used bittorrent in a long time.. could be a NAT translation problem. Might want to allow IPSec passthrough depending on BT's protocol uses for securing your computer.
May 20, 2005 3:28:15 PM

FYI.. just checked out the site.

Prior to version 3.2, BitTorrent by default uses ports in the range of 6881-6889. As of 3.2 and later, the range has been extended to 6881-6999. (These are all TCP ports, BitTorrent does not use UDP.)

For the fastest speeds, forward those ports in your NAT router.

<A HREF="http://dessent.net/btfaq/#ports" target="_new"> click here for FAQ on Bit Torrent </A>
May 21, 2005 1:22:17 AM

I dont think most wireless connections are designed to sustain the number of simultaneous connections bittorent uses. That could be your bottleneck right there. Also make sure you have given the computer a static IP before forwarding ports to it. Otherwise as soon as the ip changes you will have the same problem again. That is a common occurance even on a small scale network when using wireless.

<A HREF="http://www.folken.net/myrig.htm" target="_new">My precious...</A>
June 3, 2005 12:53:46 PM

It's happy if I turn the firewall functions of the Netgear off, and he just relies on his software firewall.

Upon thinking further, I never checked if his BT client is using the default BT ports. I have a feeling it might be utilising a different range altogether which would explain why my efforts were failing (doh! :redface: ).

I'm aware of the problems with port forwarding if you're not using a fixed IP.... Had exactly that with a customer the other day in fact.

He has other problems now, with the modem repeatedly dropping the connection, but ah well....

---
<font color=red>"Life is <i>not</i> like a box of chocolates. It's more like a jar of jalapeńos - what you do today might burn your a<b></b>ss tommorrow."
June 3, 2005 2:56:41 PM

Dropping connections sounds just like what happened to my netgear after finding the joys of BT. I just had the plain 4port switch/router combo and when running BT it would get so hot it would cause connection problems on the dsl and wired network connections. It eventually melted on me, the plastic on top litterally caved in a bit lol.
Get a Linksys, those suckers never get hot and take BT no problem.

<A HREF="http://www.folken.net/myrig.htm" target="_new">My precious...</A>
July 29, 2005 10:12:10 AM

Oddly enough, he has no problems with it now :smile: After a proper reset, and getting BT to work properly with the firewall (Had to amend the port range in the app, as I thought :redface: ), it now works fine, with no connection problems anywhere. In fact I've considered getting one myself, but can't justify the expense really :eek:  .

---
<font color=red>"Life is <i>not</i> like a box of chocolates. It's more like a jar of jalapeńos - what you do today might burn your a<b></b>ss tommorrow."
!