Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Solved

Will US Electronics Work in Europe? (not an electrical Problem)

Tags:
  • Internet Explorer
  • Computers
  • Electronic
  • Components
Last response: in Components
Share
February 29, 2012 8:17:19 PM

This simple question is do American electronics work the same throught a computer connection (ie. USB ports) or are European computers set up on a different standard of ports?

Ok one of my family members is going to Europe and i was wondering if they brought a mp3 player we bought as a gift there would work there? And I Know that European electrical outlets are 220 Volts while the Unites States is set up on a 110 Volt System, but i am not sure if this difference extends to there computer setup or if there ports are the same and if it will cause any problems with charging a generic mp3 device.

More about : electronics work europe electrical problem

February 29, 2012 8:43:39 PM

No, there are no 'computer' specific differences between the US and European countries.
m
0
l

Best solution

February 29, 2012 10:17:01 PM

If it only connects to the computer and not to a wall outlet you can use electronics anywhere. The PSU for the system handles the only difference between US and European power grids, everything inside the computer is the same. USB, PCI, PCI-e and SATA are all standardized by the IEEE, an international committee, so it works everywhere.
Share
February 29, 2012 10:29:13 PM

Why do some power supplies have the red switch on the back of them? I was always under the impression you had to change that if you went overseas to another power source. I think it changes from 120v to 230v or something maybe?
m
0
l
February 29, 2012 10:34:03 PM

mightymaxio said:
Why do some power supplies have the red switch on the back of them? I was always under the impression you had to change that if you went overseas to another power source. I think it changes from 120v to 230v or something maybe?

It does, but the power supply still puts out the same basic 3.3, 5 and 12 volts for the computer components.

Modern power supplies(and even most cell phone and laptop chargers) are full range no longer needing the switch(should list something like 90-260 v~ 50/60hz).
m
0
l
February 29, 2012 10:47:20 PM

That red switch is a switch for a voltage doubler circuit that changes 115 V to 230 V in the PSU for systems that are going to be used in the US, some PSUs don't have that circuit and are 230 V only, but most PSUs these days have active PFC which as a bonus feature gives them a full range input from 90-260 V.

Regardless of the type of input, once you pass the primary side and into the secondary there is no difference in the unit regardless of what voltage is coming in.
m
0
l
March 1, 2012 3:28:32 AM

Best answer selected by zygodactyl.
m
0
l
March 1, 2012 3:40:52 AM

Thanks for the help everybody
m
0
l
!