Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Closed

Which PSU is better?

Last response: in Systems
Share
November 29, 2011 2:36:27 AM

Corsair Gaming Series GS600

Details
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

or

Silverstone Strider Essential Series 600W (SST-ST60F-ES)

Details
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...


These two PSU have great quality, but which one is worth to buy? The Silverstone is a bit cheaper.

The Silverstone support for 4 pcie connector while the Corsair support 2 pcie. But Silverstone only have 1x 6+2-pin, the Corsair has 2x 6+2-pin. For now I use GT 430 which is not required to install the power cable from PSU, but I might want to upgrade to GTX series which need 8/6 pin.

If both PSU above does not have 8/6 pin to power a GPU (ex: GTX 580/560 or any GPU that required 8-8/6 pin power), can I just use converter? I mean I buy a connector (from 6 pin to 8 pin, like the SATA converter).

Hope you can understand.

More about : psu

November 29, 2011 2:51:34 AM

Most cards that require 6/8pin power come with adapters and require two pcie power connectors. I would get the corsair because of the extra 6/8pin but do you ever want to run sli/cf.
November 29, 2011 3:02:28 AM

Here I was getting ready to say that the Silverstone was pretty impressive.

I pulled up a 500w Silverstone Strider from a website I trust and the PSU gave out almost 650w before it burned out. The power delivery was very clean on it too.

Then I saw the downfall. The 500w had 30A on both the 3.3v and the 5v and only 18a on the 2x 12vs.

http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/fullimage.php?image=1005...

That kinda kills it for me right there. That is just way too much juice on the smaller voltages and far too little on the larger voltages.

The Strider 500 seems like it was built for pre 2000 PCs and I wouldn't get it on that basis.

If you do decide to get the strider 600, you may have some difficulty powering a hungry video card like a gtx 580. There may just not be enough juice on the 12vs.

You are rolling the dice with that one.

On the other hand, look at the Corsair 600w. It has 25a on both the 3.3v and the 5v and 48a on the 12v.

That looks more like it is built to be running 2011 PCs.

I would pay the extra for the Corsair.
Related resources
Can't find your answer ? Ask !
November 29, 2011 3:06:18 AM

andrewcarr said:
Most cards that require 6/8pin power come with adapters and require two pcie power connectors. I would get the corsair because of the extra 6/8pin but do you ever want to run sli/cf.


I was thinking to run sli/cf before, but for now, I think one high end GPU still can run games very good. I actually don't care much about games setting (high or not), as long as I can play games smoothly and not lagging. My Geforce GT 430 1GB can run most games smoothly (highest and lowest settings), :D  .

I was thinking to get the Corsair but the Silverstone has more cables. Is that matter?

So there's no problem connecting this PSU to GPU like GTX580/560 or the HD6850 since you said most cards comes with adapters, right?
November 29, 2011 3:11:30 AM

I would be surprised if you need adapters for the Corsair.

Just stick with 1 big fat graphics card rather than x2ing, imho.

I have read micro stuttering horror stories recently, though, so that kinda affects my recommendation there.
November 29, 2011 6:04:16 AM

Ok. I'm going to buy the Corsair. Thanks guys.
November 29, 2011 6:07:04 AM

ok just remember it's not modular
November 29, 2011 10:13:40 AM

Raiddinn said:
Here I was getting ready to say that the Silverstone was pretty impressive.

I pulled up a 500w Silverstone Strider from a website I trust and the PSU gave out almost 650w before it burned out. The power delivery was very clean on it too.

Then I saw the downfall. The 500w had 30A on both the 3.3v and the 5v and only 18a on the 2x 12vs.

http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/fullimage.php?image=1005...

That kinda kills it for me right there. That is just way too much juice on the smaller voltages and far too little on the larger voltages.

The Strider 500 seems like it was built for pre 2000 PCs and I wouldn't get it on that basis.

If you do decide to get the strider 600, you may have some difficulty powering a hungry video card like a gtx 580. There may just not be enough juice on the 12vs.

You are rolling the dice with that one.

On the other hand, look at the Corsair 600w. It has 25a on both the 3.3v and the 5v and 48a on the 12v.

That looks more like it is built to be running 2011 PCs.

I would pay the extra for the Corsair.

You are talking about the original Striders, not the Strider Essential that Maxson listed.
The Strider Essential 600W has 25A on the 3.3 and 5V rails and a 42A 12V rail.

And the Corsair CX600 has a 40A 12V rail, not a 48A 12V rail.

Functionally the Strider Essential is superior as it has four PCIe cables while the Corsair only has two.
November 29, 2011 11:39:29 AM

The OP isn't talking about the CX600, they linked the Corsair Gaming Series GS600 which has 48a.

In any event, it is still too hard to find the Strider Essential brand on good review sites yet they are reviewed all over the place on poor ones which is a black mark for me.

I could be wrong about the Strider Essential ones, but I wouldn't try it myself to find out.

Also, 600w is pushing it for x2ing good video cards anyway especially if we are talking about current gen cards. 2x GTX 570s is 450w and the processor (assuming its a gaming processor) is another 125 which totals to 575 without including anything else. That is all 12v power and at 48a that is 504w, which is already short 71w on the 12vs.

Based on that, a 1x setup is really all that is feasible for these 600ws and there is really no need for the extra video card cables for what we are talking about.
November 29, 2011 1:49:14 PM

My mistake on seeing the CX series where it is not.
November 30, 2011 2:13:30 AM

madchemist83 said:
ok just remember it's not modular


What do you mean? :heink:  What is the difference?
November 30, 2011 2:18:57 AM

Modular means that each cable disconnects from the PSU non-modular is where all the cables are attached to PSU and can't be removed without damaging PSU. Helps keep the build neat and better air flow.
November 30, 2011 2:52:02 AM

what is a good corsair 750w+ modular psu?
November 30, 2011 3:41:33 AM

andrewcarr said:
Modular means that each cable disconnects from the PSU non-modular is where all the cables are attached to PSU and can't be removed without damaging PSU. Helps keep the build neat and better air flow.


Oooo~~~ So the cables on non-modular PSU is not upgradable, etc while the cables on modular PSU can be removed (one by one), right? It's ok as long as the PSU can give me high quality performance. My budget is MYR1000-1100 ($345.53).

Here's my build.

Motherboard : ASRock 970 Extreme 4
PSU : Corsair Gaming Series GS600
Processor : Phenom II X4 830 2.8Ghz
RAM : 8GB 1333 DDR3 (Corsair)
Casing : Already have
CD/DVD Writer : Already have
GPU : Geforce GT430 1GB DDR3

Processor - Will upgrade later. My target before was the Phenom II X4 840, even it has higher clock speed, it does not support L3 cache. So, I might choose the 830 which support L3 cache, can I can OC it a bit.

GPU - Will upgrade later. All games since to be working fine with this GPU. I dont really care about high setting or low, as long the game I played is smooth and doesn't lag.
November 30, 2011 4:29:08 AM

Cables aren't upgradeable. The benefit of the modular PSU, is just that if you don't need the cable, you don't have to connect it to the PSU. Less cables hanging around in your case.

For the same price, you'd be better off getting the Corsair tx650.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

November 30, 2011 11:35:30 AM

Silverstone is definitely a good brand if you want to have low amps on the 12v rails and high amps on the 3.3v and 5vs for the same wattage.
November 30, 2011 2:45:50 PM

aford10 said:
Did you find a benchmark for that?

I would certainly take the 53amps on the 12v of the Corsair vs the 46amps of the PC power and cooling.

http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/article/PC-Power-and-Coo...
Well as long as you have enough watts u should be good. And I would rather have modular psu build by seasonic.
November 30, 2011 4:30:50 PM

madchemist83 said:
http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/article/PC-Power-and-Coo...
Well as long as you have enough watts u should be good. And I would rather have modular psu build by seasonic.


If you look at the actual max wattage on the 12v rails, the PCP&C is only a 552w PSU. The Corsair that I listed, is 636. More amps, and more wattage for the Corsair.

The Strider only has a max of 504W on the 12v, and is less amps than both, the Corsair, and the PCP&C. Not to mention, the reviews of that model weren't exactly raving. It's not even rated at 80Plus efficiency.
November 30, 2011 6:54:36 PM

it is .. there reason is lower efficiency is cause thay test it at 40 degrees celcius compared to 25 degrees that it is rated for .. that's the reason.
Efficiency is not as important as build quality .. that PSU is Seasonic build .. hands down one of the best PSU builders ... also it can pull more then labeled wattage .. also you have no idea what ops system is and don't know what wattage he needs
November 30, 2011 8:06:18 PM

madchemist83 said:
it is .. there reason is lower efficiency is cause thay test it at 40 degrees celcius compared to 25 degrees that it is rated for .. that's the reason.
Efficiency is not as important as build quality .. that PSU is Seasonic build .. hands down one of the best PSU builders ... also it can pull more then labeled wattage .. also you have no idea what ops system is and don't know what wattage he needs


A lot of PSU's are tested at 40C. It's not specific to that one model.

Yes, Seasonic makes quality PSUs. I never knocked it, or said it was a poor model. I simply pointed out the areas where the Corsair was superior to the PCP&C.
November 30, 2011 11:35:04 PM

and what would be those areas? that it has more amps on 12V rail ? that's not superiority .. but a feature .. whoppady dooda .. there is daiblotek PSU that has 70 Amps on one rail(maybe) .. doesn't mean it's better
also u r wrong .. it is rated 80 plus Bronze
also efficiency is higher on PC power then corsair u linked
Check your sources

Corsair PC Power
Power load Efficiency Efficiency
40% 83% 87.50%
50% 84% 86.86%
60% 86% 86.37%
80% 84% 85.27%
100% 83% 83.92%
http://www.hardwareheaven.com/reviews/Corsair_TX650W/te...

http://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/PC_Power_Cooling/Sil...
about PC power
"Ripple at +12V is dead low in all cases. Only 14.1 mV of ripple at worst case in the most significant rail is definitely something to write home about. The minor rails registered a little higher ripple but still well below half of the limit (50 mV) even at worst case scenario. To speak frankly we didn't expect to see something different in ripple measurements from a Seasonic product since this company has mastered ripple suppression for ages now"

http://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/PC_Power_Cooling/Sil...
looks like compared to Corsair TX750W M performance rating is better and performance per dollar is way better

so please tell me what are those superiorities u r talking about
November 30, 2011 11:50:32 PM

Ok, most hardware is powered from the 12v rail. The corsair has more amps.

The hardware also needs watts to be able to run at max performance. The Corsair is capable of putting out more wattage on the 12v rail.

As far as the efficiency goes, I was referring to the Strider. Look above, and you'll see that. Never did I say the Corsair was more efficient than the PCP&C. You made a comment about the temp that the PCP&C was tested at, and I said that was common.

And your comparison (price/performance) to the tx750 is moot, because I'm talking about the tx650.

You need to relax, and not take it so personal when someone points out another option.
November 30, 2011 11:58:43 PM

im not taking it personal just facts brother .. just facts
:) 
December 1, 2011 12:15:09 AM

To get 70A on the 12v a diablotek would have to be rated something like... 1800w

If such a product is in their catalog, I highly doubt it would be optimal for pretty much anybody.

We are mostly talking about stuff more in the 650w range for which Diablotek says 46a on the box and for which they really mean 23a. They have this thing they do where they just double all the numbers on the box before they ship things out. Fancy that.

Nobody should really be bickering back and forth about whether or not to get a Corsair or Seasonic PSU, both are Tier 1 brands.

December 1, 2011 12:39:35 AM

hehe good point ..
but if u look at the original post the question is between 600W PSUs .. so why are we talking about 650W ???
I asked OP what kind of wattage is he looking for
and all of ya seems to think that it's not important
December 1, 2011 1:25:33 AM

The GS600 seems better to me [i may be wrong]

the pc I built has a gs600 and its great so far.
December 1, 2011 1:55:16 AM

Corsair Gaming Series GS600 (600W)

Silverstone Strider Essential Series 600W (SST-ST60F-ES)

I'm not going to buy one of this PSU from Newegg (I just use newegg link to get the product details), but from online shopping in my country (www.lelong.com.my).

So, I found these PSUs have great prices for the watt and brand. Im not extreme gamer/overclocker.

Details (Corsair)

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Details (Silverstone)

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

The Silverstone only have 75.80% Efficiency, and the Corsair > 80% Efficiency.

Corsair
1 x Main connector (24Pin)
1 x 8 Pin EPS/ATX12V CPU
8 x Peripheral
6 x SATA
2 x Floppy
2 x PCI-E (2x 6+2-Pin)

+12V Rails = Single

Silverstone
1 x Main connector (24Pin)
1 x 8-pin EPS12V
1 x 4-pin ATX12V
1 x 6-pin AUX
4 x PCI-E (4x 6-pin)
6 x SATA
8 x Peripheral
2 x Floppy

+12V Rails = 4

Best solution

December 1, 2011 2:07:56 AM
Share

If those are your only 2 choices, go with the GS600.
December 2, 2011 3:49:43 AM

Best answer selected by maxson.
!