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How can I test my motherboard's memory capacity?

Last response: in Memory
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January 8, 2013 4:20:05 PM

I plan to install Windows 7 OEM on my computer and want to increase the RAM to 6GB or 8Gb. However, I first need to determine if my MB can handle more than 4GB. As I'm going to use an OEM version of Windows 7, I need to know what my MB is capable of prior to making the change. I don't want to Install Windows 7 and find out I need a new MB, then have to deal with WPA when I switch MBs after my initial Windows 7 installation.

I am currently running Windows XP Pro on a Biostar TForce 550 v1.2. v1.3 can handle 8GB of RAM but Biostar support told me they have not tested v1.2 with 8GB and didn't offer any suggestions as to how I could do my own testing. I can borrow some extra RAM from my other computer and test this one with 6GB if someone can tell me how (or if) I can safely do this under XP Pro 32 bit.

The only thing I can think of is installing 6GB and checking System Information in System Tools. But I don't know if seeing 6GB in the System Information report would mean that that my motherboard can handle 6GB or if it would just mean that info32 found 6GB.

I realize my hardware is relatively old, but it is fine for my purposes (spreadsheet, word processing, email and Web surfing) and it has been very reliable and stable, plus I'd rather not spend money on new hardware if it's not necessary. The only change I plan to make other than RAM is to add a better graphics card, probably a Zotac ZT-60602-10L.

Here's what I have now:

Biostar TForce 550 v1.2
3GB Corsair XMS2 DDR2-800
Athlon 64 X2 4200+ Windsor
Gigabyte 7200GT 256 MB GPU
Thermaltake TR2 430w PSU
Windows XP Pro SP3 OEM

Best solution

a b $ Windows 7
January 8, 2013 4:55:50 PM

a lot of ram will not benefit you as your system is an old dual core
save up, sell what you have now and build a new pc and then you can get 4-8gb of ram
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a c 80 } Memory
a b $ Windows 7
January 8, 2013 4:57:44 PM

You need have the CPU that supports 64-bit and the 64-bit OS.

You have the 64-bit CPU but you don't have the 64-bit OS, then you can't. Only the 64-bit OS can use more than 4GB RAM. If you have it (64-bitOS) just add the RAM and go to Mycomputer>properties, then you will see.
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January 8, 2013 5:18:18 PM

alvine said:
a lot of ram will not benefit you as your system is an old dual core
save up, sell what you have now and build a new pc and then you can get 4-8gb of ram


Well, a new system would be nice, but cost is an issue and I have two nearly identical systems to upgrade/replace, so I'd like to breath enough new life into them to hold me for a few years of low-level use. I'm not a gamer and don't do graphic design or photo/video editing.

Why would additional memory not be beneficial with Windows 7 on my system?
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January 8, 2013 5:24:43 PM

cin19 said:
You need have the CPU that supports 64-bit and the 64-bit OS.

You have the 64-bit CPU but you don't have the 64-bit OS, then you can't. Only the 64-bit OS can use more than 4GB RAM. If you have it (64-bitOS) just add the RAM and go to Mycomputer>properties, then you will see.


When I install Windows 7 it will be the 64-bit version. I neglected to mention that in my post.

My concern is that after installing Windows 7 64-bit OEM I may go to System Information and see only 4GB, which would tell me that I should have bought a new motherboard before I installed an OEM version of Windows 7. Then I'd have WPA problems. So I'd like to find out the capability of my motherboard before I install the new OS.
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a c 80 } Memory
a b $ Windows 7
January 8, 2013 5:37:20 PM

In that case I will recommend buy the win7 upgrade retail version, then you can re-instali it into other new MB, if you can find one in your area.
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January 9, 2013 3:01:29 PM

Best answer selected by hiker99.
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