Using PSP on planes?

Archived from groups: alt.games.video.sony-playstation2 (More info?)

Does anyone know if the PSP WiFi can be turned off so that the PSP can be
safely used on planes?

Also, would anyone recommend NFS Underground? I'm getting this but thinking
about swopping it for Wipeout or RR if its not too good.

Thanks,
Dave. ]
16 answers Last reply
More about using planes
  1. Archived from groups: alt.games.video.sony-playstation2 (More info?)

    "Dave" <dave.brannan@blueyonder.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:HJX4e.5347$G8.2890@text.news.blueyonder.co.uk...
    > Does anyone know if the PSP WiFi can be turned off so that the PSP can be
    > safely used on planes?

    The wifi is set to off by default I think. Check the map in your manual,
    the switch by the memory card I think is wifi make sure its not switched to
    wifi.
  2. Archived from groups: alt.games.video.sony-playstation2 (More info?)

    "Beck" <invalid@invalid.invalid> wrote in message
    news:3bj1fvF6g5b9qU1@individual.net...
    >
    > "Dave" <dave.brannan@blueyonder.co.uk> wrote in message
    > news:HJX4e.5347$G8.2890@text.news.blueyonder.co.uk...
    >> Does anyone know if the PSP WiFi can be turned off so that the PSP can be
    >> safely used on planes?
    >
    > The wifi is set to off by default I think. Check the map in your manual,
    > the switch by the memory card I think is wifi make sure its not switched
    > to wifi.
    >

    OK thanks. Its being delivered anyday now so I'll check it when it
    arrives.....
  3. Archived from groups: alt.games.video.sony-playstation2 (More info?)

    I've used mine on plane trips since January.

    "Dave" <dave.brannan@blueyonder.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:HJX4e.5347$G8.2890@text.news.blueyonder.co.uk...
    > Does anyone know if the PSP WiFi can be turned off so that the PSP can be
    > safely used on planes?
    >
    > Also, would anyone recommend NFS Underground? I'm getting this but
    thinking
    > about swopping it for Wipeout or RR if its not too good.
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Dave. ]
    >
    >
  4. Archived from groups: alt.games.video.sony-playstation2 (More info?)

    "Skye" <carolinaconvicts2@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:MEZ4e.1456$go4.189@newsread2.news.atl.earthlink.net...
    > I've used mine on plane trips since January.

    Hopefully the airport screeners will become more familiar with the PSP
    before I take it with me on a flight this summer. When I brought the PS One
    and LCD screen with me a few years back, I was hauled out of line and
    subjected to a long conversation about what it was and why it wasn't an
    explosive device.

    > "Dave" <dave.brannan@blueyonder.co.uk> wrote in message
    > news:HJX4e.5347$G8.2890@text.news.blueyonder.co.uk...
    > > Does anyone know if the PSP WiFi can be turned off so that the PSP can
    be
    > > safely used on planes?
    > >
    > > Also, would anyone recommend NFS Underground? I'm getting this but
    > thinking
    > > about swopping it for Wipeout or RR if its not too good.
    > >
    > > Thanks,
    > > Dave. ]
    > >
    > >
    >
    >
  5. Archived from groups: alt.games.video.sony-playstation2 (More info?)

    Android wrote:

    > Hopefully the airport screeners will become more familiar with the PSP
    > before I take it with me on a flight this summer. When I brought the
    > PS One and LCD screen with me a few years back, I was hauled out of
    > line and subjected to a long conversation about what it was and why
    > it wasn't an explosive device.

    I took my Japan-bought PSP on a domestic flight about two weeks before the
    U.S. launch and got taken aside for a random bag check. When the security
    guy took it out of my bag, he said, "I'll have to ask you to turn this on,
    because I have no idea what it is." Then there was a small commotion in the
    screening area as several of the officers and a couple passengers came over
    to have a look at the PSP. :)

    -Z-
  6. Archived from groups: alt.games.video.sony-playstation2 (More info?)

    "Dave" <dave.brannan@blueyonder.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:SxY4e.5378$G8.800@text.news.blueyonder.co.uk...
    >
    > "Beck" <invalid@invalid.invalid> wrote in message
    > news:3bj1fvF6g5b9qU1@individual.net...
    >>
    >> "Dave" <dave.brannan@blueyonder.co.uk> wrote in message
    >> news:HJX4e.5347$G8.2890@text.news.blueyonder.co.uk...
    >>> Does anyone know if the PSP WiFi can be turned off so that the PSP can
    >>> be safely used on planes?
    >>
    >> The wifi is set to off by default I think. Check the map in your manual,
    >> the switch by the memory card I think is wifi make sure its not switched
    >> to wifi.
    >>
    >
    > OK thanks. Its being delivered anyday now so I'll check it when it
    > arrives.....

    There is an official online manual which you can read in the meantime, I
    hope its of some use.
    http://www.playstation.com/manual/pdf/PSP-1001K_1.pdf
  7. Archived from groups: alt.games.video.sony-playstation2 (More info?)

    "Android" <androvich@NOcomcastSPAM.net> wrote in message
    news:U9qdnWZpY6VZGcnfRVn-vw@comcast.com...
    >
    > "Skye" <carolinaconvicts2@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    > news:MEZ4e.1456$go4.189@newsread2.news.atl.earthlink.net...
    > > I've used mine on plane trips since January.
    >
    > Hopefully the airport screeners will become more familiar with the PSP
    > before I take it with me on a flight this summer. When I brought the PS
    One
    > and LCD screen with me a few years back, I was hauled out of line and
    > subjected to a long conversation about what it was and why it wasn't an
    > explosive device.

    Explosive only in regards to its sales.
  8. Archived from groups: alt.games.video.sony-playstation2 (More info?)

    "Dave" wrote in message
    > Does anyone know if the PSP WiFi can be turned off so that the PSP can be
    > safely used on planes?
    >
    > Also, would anyone recommend NFS Underground? I'm getting this but
    thinking
    > about swopping it for Wipeout or RR if its not too good.
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Dave. ]

    Wifi may, enabled, actually be allowed. I was on at least one flight where
    two passengers were using 802.11 to play a multiplayer game. They asked the
    stewardess prior to playing and she gave them the ok. This was at cruise
    altitude. I believe, here in the US, electronic devices can be used once
    passing 10,000 feet during ascent. I "think" the question of allowing wifi
    is left to the discretion of the airline. I know several airlines here in
    the US have future plans on giving internet access via wifi, while the
    aircraft is above 10,000 feet. Cell phones are different though. I seem to
    recall reading an article once that one of the main problems with using a
    cell phone in an aircraft is the havoc it can cause on the cellular network
    as the phone (at altitude) could simultaneously connect to several ground
    towers.

    The concern with using consumer electronic devices on aircraft is the
    harmonics that may cause EMI interference. All aircraft systems go through
    some pretty rigorous EMI/RFI testing to ensure that they won't cause any
    interference with other aircraft systems. Obviously, consumer products
    don't undergo such testing. The 10,000 foot rule seems almost to be based
    around the idea that the aircraft has reached a sufficient altitude for
    ample allowed time to resolve any EMI issue with one of the passengers,
    should it occur. By 10,000 feet, the aircraft's FMC is pretty much running
    the entire show. Potential EMI hazards are greatest during approach.
    Anything interfering with the localizer/glideslope signals obviously
    wouldn't be a good thing.
  9. Archived from groups: alt.games.video.sony-playstation2 (More info?)

    yes, the PSP easily draws crowds... a local restaurant has wifi and i'm
    waiting for an online game to come out so i can go there and show it
    off... I can see all the little kids crying and all the waitstaff just
    standing around me, no one is getting served that night.. LOL
  10. Archived from groups: alt.games.video.sony-playstation2 (More info?)

    On Thu, 07 Apr 2005 04:24:07 GMT, "Eric" <nospam@nospam.not> wrote:

    >Wifi may, enabled, actually be allowed. I was on at least one flight where
    >two passengers were using 802.11 to play a multiplayer game. They asked the
    >stewardess prior to playing and she gave them the ok. This was at cruise
    >altitude. I believe, here in the US, electronic devices can be used once
    >passing 10,000 feet during ascent. I "think" the question of allowing wifi
    >is left to the discretion of the airline. I know several airlines here in
    >the US have future plans on giving internet access via wifi, while the
    >aircraft is above 10,000 feet. Cell phones are different though. I seem to
    >recall reading an article once that one of the main problems with using a
    >cell phone in an aircraft is the havoc it can cause on the cellular network
    >as the phone (at altitude) could simultaneously connect to several ground
    >towers.

    This is bollocks. At any one time you're in range of multiple cells
    (even on the ground), since by their design they have to overlap. Oh,
    and the idea that the airlines would be so vigilent in trying to
    reduce problems for the cellphone providers (when such a problem ought
    to be easily fixed and implementations would most likely be different
    in different countries anyway), just doesn't sound very likely. If
    presented with such a request, I'm sure the airlines would say "why
    don't you just change your systems to deal with it then?".


    >The concern with using consumer electronic devices on aircraft is the
    >harmonics that may cause EMI interference. All aircraft systems go through
    >some pretty rigorous EMI/RFI testing to ensure that they won't cause any
    >interference with other aircraft systems. Obviously, consumer products
    >don't undergo such testing. The 10,000 foot rule seems almost to be based
    >around the idea that the aircraft has reached a sufficient altitude for
    >ample allowed time to resolve any EMI issue with one of the passengers,
    >should it occur. By 10,000 feet, the aircraft's FMC is pretty much running
    >the entire show. Potential EMI hazards are greatest during approach.
    >Anything interfering with the localizer/glideslope signals obviously
    >wouldn't be a good thing.

    There's also the theory that the airlines simply don't want their
    passengers distracted during take-off and landing in case of an
    emergency - and it's nothing to do with the RFI. Of course they
    wouldn't want to admit that!


    andyt
  11. Archived from groups: alt.games.video.sony-playstation2 (More info?)

    "Andy Turner" <andyt@nospam.demon.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:d5ia51h8o5pptcul7q99njs6ueinclje47@4ax.com...
    > On Thu, 07 Apr 2005 04:24:07 GMT, "Eric" <nospam@nospam.not> wrote:
    >
    > >Wifi may, enabled, actually be allowed. I was on at least one flight
    where
    > >two passengers were using 802.11 to play a multiplayer game. They asked
    the
    > >stewardess prior to playing and she gave them the ok. This was at
    cruise
    > >altitude. I believe, here in the US, electronic devices can be used once
    > >passing 10,000 feet during ascent. I "think" the question of allowing
    wifi
    > >is left to the discretion of the airline. I know several airlines here
    in
    > >the US have future plans on giving internet access via wifi, while the
    > >aircraft is above 10,000 feet. Cell phones are different though. I seem
    to
    > >recall reading an article once that one of the main problems with using a
    > >cell phone in an aircraft is the havoc it can cause on the cellular
    network
    > >as the phone (at altitude) could simultaneously connect to several ground
    > >towers.
    >
    > This is bollocks. At any one time you're in range of multiple cells
    > (even on the ground), since by their design they have to overlap.

    Except that altitude, a cell phone is going to have LOS to not just a few
    multiple towers but dozens of them. In addition, many of the cell
    infrastructures can't support the switching that would occur from a cell
    user traveling at 300+ KIAS.

    > and the idea that the airlines would be so vigilent in trying to
    > reduce problems for the cellphone providers (when such a problem ought
    > to be easily fixed and implementations would most likely be different
    > in different countries anyway), just doesn't sound very likely. If
    > presented with such a request, I'm sure the airlines would say "why
    > don't you just change your systems to deal with it then?".

    Here in the US, it isn't the airlines that are being "vigilant in trying to
    reduce problems for cell providers". It is the FCC. Particulary, the
    FCC's Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 47, Sec. 22.925, "Prohibition on
    airborne operation of cellular telephones". I don't believe there is an
    FAA FAR that specifically covers cellular phone use while airborne (other
    than the FAR on general electronics use), however it is specifically
    prohibited by the FCC in the US. The article that I mentioned (cell phones
    playing havoc at altitude) was cited with IEEE references. Do a google. I
    just did one and got hundreds of hits on the topic of cell phones causing
    problems at altitude by accessing multiple towers -- many of which were
    sites ending in .gov
  12. Archived from groups: alt.games.video.sony-playstation2 (More info?)

    "Andy Turner" <andyt@nospam.demon.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:d5ia51h8o5pptcul7q99njs6ueinclje47@4ax.com...
    > This is bollocks. At any one time you're in range of multiple cells
    > (even on the ground), since by their design they have to overlap. Oh,
    > and the idea that the airlines would be so vigilent in trying to
    > reduce problems for the cellphone providers (when such a problem ought
    > to be easily fixed and implementations would most likely be different
    > in different countries anyway), just doesn't sound very likely. If
    > presented with such a request, I'm sure the airlines would say "why
    > don't you just change your systems to deal with it then?".

    Here you go. If you don't want to dig into the FCC and IEEE's websites,
    here is a small article that specifically states one of the problems with
    cell phone use at altitude is the havoc it can play with ground towers. It
    described the "pico cell" approach being developed to allow cell phone use
    in aircraft, without causing problems for ground networks. Its also an
    article by your BBC.

    Cheers,
    -Eric

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/4092019.stm
  13. Archived from groups: alt.games.video.sony-playstation2 (More info?)

    In article <1112892507.252259.163550@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com>,
    "Brenden D. Chase" <brenden.chase@gmail.com> wrote:

    > yes, the PSP easily draws crowds... a local restaurant has wifi and i'm
    > waiting for an online game to come out so i can go there and show it
    > off... I can see all the little kids crying and all the waitstaff just
    > standing around me, no one is getting served that night.. LOL

    Ad Hoc wireless mode isn't going to be used much. It's infrastructure
    or online mode which will be used for multiplayer.

    Even Nintendo realizes they will have to support online now.
  14. Archived from groups: alt.games.video.sony-playstation2 (More info?)

    "poldy" <poldy@kfu.com> wrote in message
    news:poldy-7667A0.23140509042005@comcast.dca.giganews.com...
    > In article <1112892507.252259.163550@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com>,
    > "Brenden D. Chase" <brenden.chase@gmail.com> wrote:
    >
    >> yes, the PSP easily draws crowds... a local restaurant has wifi and i'm
    >> waiting for an online game to come out so i can go there and show it
    >> off... I can see all the little kids crying and all the waitstaff just
    >> standing around me, no one is getting served that night.. LOL
    >
    > Ad Hoc wireless mode isn't going to be used much. It's infrastructure
    > or online mode which will be used for multiplayer.
    >

    The Ad Hoc wireless mode is used for the MANY games that don't support
    online but do support PSP to PSP through tunneling software. That is how I
    play Untold Legends and Lumines when my wife doesn't feel like a match up.
    > Even Nintendo realizes they will have to support online now.
  15. Archived from groups: alt.games.video.sony-playstation2 (More info?)

    At the end of the day why increase the risk of anything happening 35,000 ft
    up in the clouds. If the controls fail due to cell signals then there is no
    hope and hundreds of passengers lives are at risk
    "Mattinglyfan" <Estoscacahuates@comcast.net (deez nuts)> wrote in message
    news:ZJOdnctLbZKkpsTfRVn-pw@comcast.com...
    >
    > "poldy" <poldy@kfu.com> wrote in message
    > news:poldy-7667A0.23140509042005@comcast.dca.giganews.com...
    > > In article <1112892507.252259.163550@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com>,
    > > "Brenden D. Chase" <brenden.chase@gmail.com> wrote:
    > >
    > >> yes, the PSP easily draws crowds... a local restaurant has wifi and i'm
    > >> waiting for an online game to come out so i can go there and show it
    > >> off... I can see all the little kids crying and all the waitstaff just
    > >> standing around me, no one is getting served that night.. LOL
    > >
    > > Ad Hoc wireless mode isn't going to be used much. It's infrastructure
    > > or online mode which will be used for multiplayer.
    > >
    >
    > The Ad Hoc wireless mode is used for the MANY games that don't support
    > online but do support PSP to PSP through tunneling software. That is how
    I
    > play Untold Legends and Lumines when my wife doesn't feel like a match up.
    > > Even Nintendo realizes they will have to support online now.
    >
    >
  16. Archived from groups: alt.games.video.sony-playstation2 (More info?)

    "Igirisujin" <mjupforit@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:4268d1fe$0$2599$da0feed9@news.zen.co.uk...
    > At the end of the day why increase the risk of anything happening 35,000
    > ft
    > up in the clouds. If the controls fail due to cell signals then there is
    > no
    > hope and hundreds of passengers lives are at risk

    True. That is why they need to make those damned in flight calls from the
    plane a lot cheaper than $2 per minute.

    > "Mattinglyfan" <Estoscacahuates@comcast.net (deez nuts)> wrote in message
    > news:ZJOdnctLbZKkpsTfRVn-pw@comcast.com...
    >>
    >> "poldy" <poldy@kfu.com> wrote in message
    >> news:poldy-7667A0.23140509042005@comcast.dca.giganews.com...
    >> > In article <1112892507.252259.163550@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com>,
    >> > "Brenden D. Chase" <brenden.chase@gmail.com> wrote:
    >> >
    >> >> yes, the PSP easily draws crowds... a local restaurant has wifi and
    >> >> i'm
    >> >> waiting for an online game to come out so i can go there and show it
    >> >> off... I can see all the little kids crying and all the waitstaff just
    >> >> standing around me, no one is getting served that night.. LOL
    >> >
    >> > Ad Hoc wireless mode isn't going to be used much. It's infrastructure
    >> > or online mode which will be used for multiplayer.
    >> >
    >>
    >> The Ad Hoc wireless mode is used for the MANY games that don't support
    >> online but do support PSP to PSP through tunneling software. That is how
    > I
    >> play Untold Legends and Lumines when my wife doesn't feel like a match
    >> up.
    >> > Even Nintendo realizes they will have to support online now.
    >>
    >>
    >
    >
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