Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Help troubleshooting powering problem

Last response: in Systems
Share
November 30, 2011 3:33:40 PM

Hi,

Thanks for taking a moment to read my question.

I recently built a computer and attempted to power on the first time. I do already think I know what the problem is but I want to verify.

When powered on, for 2-3 seconds the fans/lights turned on and then off with a temporary period of time where I couldn't power again. If I waited 30-60 seconds I could try to power again with the same result.

I have a Zalman heatsink with an Intel Core i5 2400k on a Gigabyte motherboard. I don't think I applied the thermal grease well enough and the connection between the mobo, cpu, and heatsink is not the best.

Am I right that the faulty connection with the CPU is what causes this exact problem? Everything is connected properly, and the only other reason I think is possible is that I shorted a component.

Any thoughts are welcome.
November 30, 2011 3:43:27 PM

What power supply do you have?
m
0
l
November 30, 2011 3:46:23 PM

it would take longer for the cpu to heat up and auto shut down. Check to make sure the reset pins are plugged in to the right polarity (+) and (-). Try booting with only one stick of ram at a time to make sure it's not a bad stick. There is a troubleshooting guide somewhere...I should just put the link in my sig but those two items are a good starting point.
m
0
l
Related resources
November 30, 2011 3:51:29 PM

start removing components.... hard drive, cd rom, video card, sound card, all but one memory stick... see if issue continues... if it starts better... try putting each ting back one at a time... sounds like your Power Supply isn't sufficient or you have a loose/incorrect connection.... not necessarily your processor.

What do you mean you shorted a component?
m
0
l
November 30, 2011 3:58:25 PM

OCZ ZS Series 550W ATX12V V2.2 24PIN ATX SLI Ready 80PLUS Bronze Performance Power Supply 135mm Fan.

Video card requires 400W

I meant shorted out any of the hardware, like the mobo, cpu, etc..

Didn't have much time left over, but I took out the video card and powered up with the same result. Once I get home I'll be applying new and better thermal grease (grease used prior was Zalmans which came with heatsink) and removing connection from what isn't vital.

Any other thoughts?
m
0
l
November 30, 2011 4:03:03 PM

Check your processor pins when you redo the thermal paste(which I don't think will fix your issue)... it sounds like its sending a voltage loop through your components and it isn't getting the response it wants, so it shuts down. Weird that you have a black-out period. Try connecting power directly to wall outlet, change your power cable, check the pins on the processor/motherboard, disconnect any external connections like USB hard drives, move your memory to a different slot.... could be a simple DOA power supply or DOA Motherboard.

Does the light on the motherboard or power supply stay on?
m
0
l
November 30, 2011 4:09:55 PM

Go through all the steps in the troubleshooting checklist found in my signature. It was created to troubleshoot this type of problem.
m
0
l
November 30, 2011 4:17:45 PM

After thinking a bit more, I don't think it is the CPU connection either. The pins would be hard to get wrong though when you have a key lock on both sides of the chip...only one way to place it.

A simple DOA would be nice, but not something anyone would probably want to deal with...hopefully it's not. Would a static charge discharging from myself to the mobo or cpu cause the problem I have been describing?

I'll review your guide later, thank you for attaching it.
m
0
l
November 30, 2011 4:21:24 PM

Quote:
2. Did you plug in the 4/8-pin CPU power connector located near the CPU socket? If the motherboard has 8 pins and your PSU only has 4 pins, you can use the 4-pin connector. The 4-pin connector USUALLY goes on the 4 pins located closest to the CPU. If the motherboard has an 8-pin connector with a cover over 4 pins, you can remove the cover and use an 8-pin plug if your power supply has one. This power connector provides power to the CPU. Your system has no chance of posting without this connector plugged in! Check your motherboard owners manual for more information about the CPU power connector. The CPU power connector is usually referred to as the "12v ATX" connector in the owners manual. This is easily the most common new-builder mistake.


You know...this might be it, I can't recall plugging that style of molex into my board. I only plugged the 6-pin molex into my video card. Must have overlooked it due to assuming the large 24-pin molex did the job of powering the cpu. I'll double check when home and let you know the results.
m
0
l
November 30, 2011 4:46:09 PM

Krovax0 said:
Quote:
2. Did you plug in the 4/8-pin CPU power connector located near the CPU socket? If the motherboard has 8 pins and your PSU only has 4 pins, you can use the 4-pin connector. The 4-pin connector USUALLY goes on the 4 pins located closest to the CPU. If the motherboard has an 8-pin connector with a cover over 4 pins, you can remove the cover and use an 8-pin plug if your power supply has one. This power connector provides power to the CPU. Your system has no chance of posting without this connector plugged in! Check your motherboard owners manual for more information about the CPU power connector. The CPU power connector is usually referred to as the "12v ATX" connector in the owners manual. This is easily the most common new-builder mistake.


You know...this might be it, I can't recall plugging that style of molex into my board. I only plugged the 6-pin molex into my video card. Must have overlooked it due to assuming the large 24-pin molex did the job of powering the cpu. I'll double check when home and let you know the results.


There's your problem.
m
0
l
December 1, 2011 1:48:29 AM

Issue isn't resolved it turns out...

CPU power cord wasn't connected, but that didn't change the result I get when attempting to power the system on.

I did redo the thermal paste and made sure the CPU is probably connected to the pins on the mobo. Disconnected the power from the video card, harddrive, and dvd drive. Left one of the memory modules in, and another person on a forum noticed that I may have a problem with my memory (1.65v) having too high of a voltage for my motherboard (1.5v).

After leaving only the essential components connected, the powering problem still occurs.

Any of this help you target the true trouble maker?

m
0
l
December 1, 2011 1:52:13 AM

Did you actually perform EVERY step in the checklist? DOA parts do happen occasionally, but this type of problem is far more often caused by a simple mistake that would be caught by going through the checklist.
m
0
l
December 1, 2011 1:59:35 AM

OK. It is time to post complete system specs.
m
0
l
December 1, 2011 3:03:06 AM

OCZ ZS Series 550W ATX12V V2.2 24PIN ATX SLI Ready 80PLUS Bronze Performance Power Supply 135mm Fan

Samsung SH-222AL 22X DVD Writer SATA Lightscribe OEM

Zalman Z9 Plus ATX Mid Tower Case Black 3X5.25 1X3.5 5X3.5INT No PS W/ Fan Controller & Temp Display

Samsung S22A300B 22IN Widescreen LED Backlit LCD Monitor 1920X1080 5ms DVI VGA

Patriot Viper Xtreme 8GB 2X4GB DDR3 1866MHZ PC3-15000 9-11-9-27 1.65V XMP Ready Desktop Memory Kit

Intel Core i5 2500K Quad Core Unlocked Processor LGA1155 3.3GHZ Sandy Bridge 6MB

Zalman CNPS5X-SZ COPPER/ALUMINUM 3-HEATPIPE 92MM Hydraulic Bearing Fan LGA1155/1156/1366/775/AM2/AM3

Gigabyte P67X-UD3-B3 ATX LGA1155 P67 DDR3 3PCI-E1 2PCI 2PCI-E16 CrossFireX SATA3 USB3 *IR-$22*

EVGA GeForce GTX 550 Ti Superclocked 1024MB GDDR5 2XDVI Mini-HDMI PCI-E Video Card
m
0
l
December 1, 2011 4:53:58 AM

It might be the 1.65v ram.
m
0
l
January 26, 2013 1:04:43 PM

Do a bare bones check.take out ur MB out of cabinet and place it on any insulated table. Just connect power supply. no video cards, no hard disks, no memory. If ur MB has no inbuilt tweeter(the small black speaker) connect an external beeper to the correct F.P connector. Now start ur MB by briefly shorting the ps pins. Do u get beep?
m
0
l
!