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Can the Athlon II X3 455 really turn out to be Phenom II X4 B55?

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March 4, 2012 1:51:08 PM

Ok I purchased an Athlon II X3 455 - http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

I didn't know anything about unlocking a core at the time so ordered a motherboard that doesn't have that feature. After reading the comments about my processor it seems most are having success in unlocking the 4th core with the Biostar A880G+ so I have that arriving tuesday! Can't wait to see if I am successful too.

My question though is could this chip really be the Phenom II X4 B55 as they are saying in the comments. Would AMD really take a faster, more expensive part and disable a core and sell it cheaper? I understand meeting demand but it doesn't seem financially sound.

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March 4, 2012 5:14:20 PM

GameGuru40 said:
Ok I purchased an Athlon II X3 455 - http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

I didn't know anything about unlocking a core at the time so ordered a motherboard that doesn't have that feature. After reading the comments about my processor it seems most are having success in unlocking the 4th core with the Biostar A880G+ so I have that arriving tuesday! Can't wait to see if I am successful too.

My question though is could this chip really be the Phenom II X4 B55 as they are saying in the comments. Would AMD really take a faster, more expensive part and disable a core and sell it cheaper? I understand meeting demand but it doesn't seem financially sound.



It is possible yes, the athlon X 3 all have a disabled 4th cores. Now this core may have been disabled because it was faulty or it may have been disabled and sold as a x3 to meet demands. Successful unlocks on a stable 4th core seem to be roughly 40-50% from what I read. Some have locked L3 cache as well that can also be unlocked. Those that have locked L3 were Phenom dies and have the potential to unlock to true Phenom chip, those that do not would simply be quad core athlon. CPU-z and other similar programs will misread all chips as Phenoms even if they do not have L3 cache. Only a low percentage of these Athlon X3 tend to be true Phenom chips, 10-15%.

You can determine the die (Athlon or Phenom) by the manufacturers number on the chip. "AC" means a Deneb chip which as the possibility of working L3 and "AD" mean Propus which does not.

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March 7, 2012 3:17:52 AM

i have this cpu and i have it unlocked to a phenom ii x4 b55 @ 3.315 Ghz. being it is a propus core it does NOT have l3 cache native as the denabs do (the 455 is a propus core - at least the 3 i bought from newegg were). my mobo is an asus m4n68t-m v2 and it worked right off with no problems. ran p95 for a few hours and seems stable so far. i doubt the cpu temps i get are correct 10c - 40c max but the mainboard and external cpu sensors read good at around 30c - 39c average. i have researched that the success rate of unlocking cores on these are quite high, well over 50%. even though cpuid states phenom ii x4 b55 i think it is more of an athlon ii x4 since lack of l3. but either way i am glad it worked and i see a big improvement over my athlon ii x2 250. once i have had it a while i may try OCing but at the moment i am content. so, to answer your question yes i can unlock to a p11 b55, but will it ???? you have to try it and see. as gameguru said sometimes cores are disbables cuz they are faulty or to meet demands ... but my opinion is the latter (at least with propus cores)
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March 7, 2012 5:56:05 AM

GameGuru40 said:

My question though is could this chip really be the Phenom II X4 B55 as they are saying in the comments. Would AMD really take a faster, more expensive part and disable a core and sell it cheaper? I understand meeting demand but it doesn't seem financially sound.


None of this is unusual. Its been done for years in the industry. Often times the difference between a $100 part and a $1000 part is just a different multiplier and some disabled cache. What's different with Phenom II is that end users have the ability to reactivate the disabled component.

As for financials, the ability to recycle parts that would otherwise be thrown away easily make up for any loss from disabling good parts. For example, the X3 720 was a $190 part when its quad core counterpart was $220. So AMD was making $190 on a part they otherwise would have thrown away and only losing $30 by disabling a good part. And the alternative to the X3 at the lower price points would likely have been downclocked X4's, which would have cost just as much to manufacture as disabled X3's.
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