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Disc Drive-less Win 7 Installation Problem

Last response: in Windows 7
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December 29, 2011 3:40:44 AM

So the idea is that I've built a gaming rig, but I'm not sure I'll be able to game on it anytime soon as I'm unable to install Windows 7.

I decided I would install Windows 7 without a disc drive as I don't really use discs anymore, and would do a USB installation instead.

So far I managed to get Windows 7 installation to start, but I get an error asking me to install drivers for a disc drive, which I don't have.

I've been trying to install Windows for several hours and have had no luck getting past this point.

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My Computer's Specs:

Mainboard - Gigabyte GA-Z68X-UD3H-B3

CPU- Intel i5 2500 Socket 1155

RAM - Kingston HyperX 8GB (2 x 4GB)

PSU - Corsair TX850M

GPU - PNY GTX 550 Ti

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If I'm missing anything else, please ask. I'd like to get this problem solved. And thanks in advance for any help.
December 29, 2011 4:19:48 AM

Is your Hard Drive set up in any kind of RAID configuration?
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December 29, 2011 4:29:11 AM

There is no RAID configuration set for my hard drive.
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a b \ Driver
a b $ Windows 7
December 29, 2011 4:50:11 AM

Do u have the boot device set for USB?
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a b $ Windows 7
December 29, 2011 5:00:06 AM

You didn't mention you had a hard drive in your specs?

Make sure the hard drive is detected in the bios, seems like setup isn't detecting a hard drive at all.
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December 29, 2011 11:04:14 AM

daship said:
You didn't mention you had a hard drive in your specs?

Make sure the hard drive is detected in the bios, seems like setup isn't detecting a hard drive at all.


I have a Seagate Barracuda ST1000DM003 1TB installed.

My BIOS does see the hard drive.

Another thing that happens is Windows 7 doesn't let me format the drive and says it's read only, or it's not plugged in properly.

I plugged it into the Mainboard's SATA3_0, and it has the power plugged into it as well.

Do I need to add a jumper to the pins on it? Or leave the pines alone?


And I also have my USB set as the boot device. It does start up the Win 7 installation, but it asks me for drivers for the disc drive, which I don't have.
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a b \ Driver
a b $ Windows 7
December 29, 2011 12:06:58 PM

If HDD access mode in BIOS is set to AHCI/RAID mode, you will need the driver that come s on the motherboard CD, just copy it to the root of the pen drive and W7 should pick it up or let you browse to it.
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a b \ Driver
a b $ Windows 7
December 29, 2011 3:24:39 PM

make sure your usb flash drive is in a usb 2.0 port and not the usb 3.0 port
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a b \ Driver
a b $ Windows 7
December 29, 2011 11:45:07 PM

What format did you use for the thumbdrive ? IIRC it must be FAT32 not NTFS
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a b \ Driver
a b $ Windows 7
December 30, 2011 9:52:12 AM

you can have it as ntfs for installing windows 7

thats what my 16gb is formatted to so i can still put files over 4gb on the unused space
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a b \ Driver
a b $ Windows 7
December 30, 2011 1:12:55 PM

mcnumpty23 said:
you can have it as ntfs for installing windows 7

thats what my 16gb is formatted to so i can still put files over 4gb on the unused space


Perhaps it has changed then -- or could be that only some newer MOBOs support using NTFS by having proper support for that format USB in their BIOS which might be part of the problem if his MOBO does not have proper support for it --- I know it used to be the case that you had to use FAT32 which is why all of the OEM manufacturers still format their recovery partitions in that format (ie. the hidden recovery partitions on almost all prebuilt system are formatted as FAT32 not NTFS !)
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a b \ Driver
a b $ Windows 7
December 30, 2011 2:22:18 PM

JDFan said:
Perhaps it has changed then -- or could be that only some newer MOBOs support using NTFS by having proper support for that format USB in their BIOS which might be part of the problem if his MOBO does not have proper support for it --- I know it used to be the case that you had to use FAT32 which is why all of the OEM manufacturers still format their recovery partitions in that format (ie. the hidden recovery partitions on almost all prebuilt system are formatted as FAT32 not NTFS !)


possibly OEM manufacturers still use fat32 as why fix it if its not broken--all their stuff is set that way and still works to restore windows when needed

i only found you could do it when i got a 16gb flash drive and still had all the extra space on it after making it bootable to install windows and wanted to transfer a file over 4gb to a friends pc--fat32 wont allow a single file over 4gb--so i looked at partitioning the flash drive with one fat32 and one ntfs partition only to find partitioning flash drives wont work

so i looked into formatting it all as ntfs and found you can still load windows 7 from it and have a software folder to put all the other stuff in to use the extra space--the software folder doesnt stop windows loading

have tried it on older hardware--5 or 6 year old probably ibm thinkpad t40 and it worked fine
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